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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, May 8, 1945 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 8, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OF AHQ ASCHI NES I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAV Mvna ivKSQAY MAY 9 TRUMAN PROCLAIMS END OF EUROPEAN CONFLICT Hostilities End at HOW I How Allies Germans Ended European War D Br BOYD D LEWIS Keims r ranee i a m European time Monday and ended I witnessed this historic stcnt In a ceremony exactly 20 rain utes long Col Gen Gustav Jodl chief of staff of Admiral Doenitz government and longtime close friend ot Adolf Hitler surren dered all German armed force on land sea and in the air The surrender is effective one Minute after midnight Wednes day British double summer time p in CAVT A high officer said almost all firing had ceased on the remain ing fronts The actual signing took 5 min utes There are 4 copies of the v surrenderdocument and nvaddi faon the naval disarmament or VHSL which was signed by Ad miral Sir Harold Burroughs al lied naval chief Immediately after sijrninr the last document with a bold Jodl the nazi arose bowed and in a broken voice pleaded for gener osity for the German people the German armed forces who he said both have achieved and suffered more perhaps than any other people in the world Gen Dwight D Eisenhower smiling confident and restrained sat with his deputy Britains Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Ted der beside him Later in a 3 rnmute statement for newsreels Eisenhower hailed the German surrender as the conclusion of the plan reached by President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill at Casablanca in 1942 unconditional surrender We have defeated Germany on land sea and in the air Eisen hower said He added that the Seace was fittingly France a country which snf tered so much at the hands of Germany and whose liberation started on Dday just 11 months ago Sunday Eisenhower did not attend the actual signing That was carried out by eenerals of America Rus Adm Doenitz Offers to Retain Office London rand Admiral Karl Doenitz appointed by Adolf Hitler to succeed him as fuehrer of Germany offered Tuesday to remain at the helm of the govern ment during allied occupation of the reich When Germany la occupied WrJS People in a broadcast over the Flensburg iio controlwiUbein the nds of the occupying powers It rests with whether or not I and the reich government painted by me can be in office onld I be able to he of use and assistance to my fatherland by coaunuine in office there I shall remain in office lie recalled that he had prom he would try in the coming times of distress to provide tol srable living conditions for Ger Tuesday Challenge of Work Appoints Sunday DayjMhajiksgiving Text on Page 2 a m Wednesday European e T end at I dont know whether I shall be able to help you in these hard lays Doenitz told the Germans they must face the fact that the found ations on which Hitlers third rejch were built and collapsed left 4he Doenitz said he ordered the jerman high command to surren all German ting forces m all theaters of var in order to save the lives of he German people After signing the last shee rw Admiral Han JodlE aicie tt Oxinius jumped up with him It Gea Walter Bedell Smith who signed for AngloAmerican forces as SHAEF chief mO Monday morninr to arrange for German liaison officers to carry Vurrender ana Jnent orders Jodl stood with eyes half shut words want to say a few Then he spoke rapidly in f in a Voice seemed o h of cracking once or twice General with this signatnre me berman people and the Ger man armed forces are for the mnr more than five years both have achieved more and suffered more fhJ hapshan oher people in me victor will treat them with generosity Ten minutes later he was pre ere vhe com mander Eisenhower stood verv gnm at his desk in his cubbyhole asked Jodl under stood the erms he could carry out Jodt yes to IW3j K W D Strong SHAEF intelli gence officer who was the inter preter The Germans heels clicked and they strode out Jodl tripping on a camera floodlight cable The war was ended at a black bl Six m floodlights which heated the tiny war room almost insuffer crably jT yw p ne hostilities will G3SG Soldiers of the German armed Czech Radio Says Cease in Prague STALIN DRESDEN TAKEN ja sion has slendered iSionafy then onlv It Avas President Trumans 61st he describedit in his proclamation ne designated next Simrlav of prayer for offering joyful thanks to PnH fn s to Japanese divi g be done hite house and a day battles set out o the bitter roafl to captivity thus making a last sacrifice for the f71i0 fwomen children and for the future of our nation We DOW in reverence before the thousandfold proven galian and Doenitz has not revealed the personnel of his entire cabinet He did announce that Count Ludwi Schwenn von Krosigk had placed Joachim von Ribbentron foreign minister however The allies probably viil treat dtfeited London sources said it was al most certain that he would not be tried as a war criminal since he had been a naval commander without political power thcWh the war until its final days BrownOut in America Ends With Finish of Conflict in Europe Washington out is ended The war production board Tuesday revoked its order against unnecessary lighting immediate y after President Trumans pro clamation of victory in Europe 11 Jfa the liftinS the so ailed morale curbs on civilian ctivity imposed during last win ers military setbacks rTihiJnight curfew and the irohibition against horseracing are xvected to be dissolved shortly no action has been taken yet Bonds and Nazi Holdouts Still Fighting in Prague London h e Czechcon trolled radio announced Tuesday that a cease order had been issued in Prague and its vicinity upon agreement between th Lzech and German commanders Marshal Stalin announced the capture of Dresden capital o as the d y i n g Gerraai grip slowly relaxed on the south ern German pocket while allied Europe celebrated VE day Czech broadcast said the timef P central war Shortly before Marshal Stalin announced the fal of Olmuetz a rail center 128 miles east of the Czechoslovak capital The Belgrade radio also an nounced that Marshal Titos Yugoslav partisans had capturec ffreVapital of puppet Croatia and last major Yugoslav city that had been held by the Germans Only a handful of naxi holdouts were reported still fighting at larrest European city still m the hands of defiant oerman forces The Czech broadcast said who ever didnot obey the order to cease fire would be courtmar tialed broadcasts from the em capital said nazis still were shooting burning and looting in the city at noon in defiance of the signing of an unconditional sur render by their commander now ln control of all tank formations are attacking Czechoslovak formations Grman broadcasts said that condnued resistance in the south ern pocket uas designed Jo remnants to retreat U S 3rd n o the and 3 driving toward lhe east arm cap outskirts o an armie the sam northeast r ro o f transmitters broadcast tnis noon report ceasc fire dis are h r ceasc re order are shelling and setting fire to houses and Par foanS an Iootin Parts of Prague are in flames and firemen arc prevented by Ger the PProacmg the ing buildings In some places m the center of the city German r were I tt ea north arid southeast rZhe PPaP0t said naz Gen Ferdinand von Schoerner ancl Mo ravia signed unconditional SUr render terms at a m battle front tme and that units were to cease fire as soon as they re ceived word of the capitulation Earlier the partisans said V had them armies The Ctechs sait advance American tank luYite 4ere 4 miles from Prague Three Kussian armiej were driv east and north and r had been reported 60 miles from the Czech capital As for the other German pock ets this was their disposition as ir 1JUSSian5 and the western allies began the final roundup troops re mained in their barracks awaiting the allied will as British ships were reported steaming into No wegian harbors estimated 300000 ermanSi Latvians and Russians img Genera Vlassovs army red army against the sea and on the Vistula were or annihilation German radio vnSburr sald withdrawals rom Yugoslavia continued as the Jugoslav radio announced the Ub capital of 74 north tJJU VCI1I west of Zagreb Eastern Moravia and the Adja still was re ported by the Germans as Russian armes began the mopup The French Ger La Ro elle St Nazaire Bordeaux and jonent were expected to lay down hear arms without further trou PROMISE AID TO PACIFIC FORCES Gen Marshall Speaks to American Troops Washington OIPJGen George C Marshall army chief of staff Tuesday promised veterans who have been fighting the Japanese for a long m the Pacific that new forces will be shipped to the racilic with the utmost speed in order that they may be returned home In his message to troops through out the world on the defeat of Germany he stated Those veterans who have been Jong overseas and suffered the hfmrdS of many battles should be spared further sacnfices but others must move in ani overwhelming flood to the Pa cific to bring that war to the earli est possible conclusion as well as but rTSrec LIIB forces of Germany haw i V eral Eisenhower turns The flags of freedom fly to the Ullited f Join in of Churchil Proclaims VE Unconditional Surrender to Be Signed in Berlin in victory Unis will be p m War Time Churchill officially bearing ou Tuesdays dispatch of Edward ui Kennedy of The Associated Press said the German capitulation oc curred at Gen Eisenhowers headquarters at Reims at m Monday The capitulation was made si multaneously to the allies and thi rovlet high command with Gen Jodl representative of the German niEh command and of Grand Ad the for uermany Today agreement Churchill said this will be ratified and Berlin n fh f n that theater the u weary sforces in 4T ivyltui in rope that m company with their allies they had composed the ireatest military team in history Gen Henry H Arnold com mander of the army air forces am in a victory message no large cale demobilization of army flyers an take nlnpA vot 1 haV fh accented but wil1 be t growing offensive gainst the Japanese he said the army air forces will play a ital role At the same time they lust supply the punch to occupa lon forces throughout the world imally they must maintain a network of supply and transport ines to all corners of the earth Japan remains to be defeated e continued and until that task is large scale de mobilization can take place in the AAF Arnold said that the few airmen who can be spared will be re urned to civilian life as iible They will be n the AAF under the same landards that govern release from ne army ground forces and the army service forces Uv owun wnere At Chief Marshal Tedder deputy supreme commander of the allied expeditionary force and Gen Tassigny will sign on behalf of General Eisenhower He said the Germans are still JVeuSting the Russians but added that if resistance con tinued after midnight They will of course deprive themselves ot the protection of the laws of war and will be attacked from all quarters by the allied troops He said it was not surprising that commands of She German nigh command should not be obeyed immediately because of disorganization But he added immediately that 1 information fur nished by should not prevent us from celebrating Tuesday and Wednesday as vic tory m Europe days The German war is therefore at an enri he said He same reminded time that Britain at the We may allow may aow ourselves a brief period of rejoic ing but let us not forget for a moment the toil and efforts that and greed he declared remains nnsuMtied The injury she ha flitted on the United and other countries and her detestable We must now devote all du strength and resources to the com pletion of our task both at home and abroad Churchill closed his historic message with these words Advance Britannia Long live Thus was broueht to a close the titanic struggle which cost Ameri 13200 more than 550000 other casnal in 3 years 4 months and 7 fsMlnK Mr Truman it clear freedom God save the cause o the Icing As he ended buglers from the Scots guard blew their ceremonial song of victory At Buckingham Palace packed thousands cheered in exultation as the king and queen with the princesses appeared on the bal cony and waved to express their joy over peace in Europe The king was scheduled to broadcast al 9 p time m 2 p m Ceniral ivar Weather Report Mason City Fair and cooler Tuesday night with lowest temperature about 28 rtay increasing cloudiness and not quite so cool in the after noon Iowa Fair and cooler Tuesdav night with freezing tures in the north and west and near ireezing in the southeast portion Wednesday increasing coudiness in the afternoon slightly warmer in the west portion m the afternoon Minnesota Fair Tuesday night and Wednesday except snow Hurries continuing northeast portion Tuesday night con tinued cold with freezing tem perature Tuesday night low temperature 22 extreme north i i5Seme southContinued cool Wednesday Diminishing winds Tuesday night IN MASON CITY SlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 59 Minimum Monday 31 At 8 a m Tuesday 34 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation ill not cease until the Japanese miUtary and naval forces lav down their arms as P Ger many has done At the same time Mr Truman Save ns assurance that uncond surrender does not mean of 7Crminaton or enslavement 01 the Japanese people It means for them he said the end of the war the termirTaUon naCnCC O lead prc 7C i iiuuiary lead ers who have brought Japan to the present brink of disaster lhe president called upon every merican to stick fp his post un 3nd lhe called upon whatever their V joyful thinks Gotl for Jhc victory we have won usl fhPrayhfat hc wil1 us to the end of our present struff S t 60 13 28 a ncws conference im y Preceding the broadcast that he thought Mothers day was an appropriate time to celebrate ihe victory The presidents declaration was synchronized with similar victory proclamations by PremierMar shal Stalin and British Prime Min ister Churchill in Moscow and ionrton at the same hour rfrf uma5s address in cluded a brief introductory to the vi proclamation and in addition ne issued a separate statement to nis news conference dealing es pecially with the Japanese Shortly before the formal dec laration of victory in Europe Grand Admiral Karl Doenitz act ing as German fuehrer told his own people that all German arms would be silent by 4 p m cen tral war time Tuesday This was m line with the unconditional surrender disclosed Monday to have taken place at General Eis enhowers headquarters at Reims   

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