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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 24, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES DES UOINES IA THE NEWSPAPER THAT i and United Press Full Uased Wires Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA MAKES AkL NORTH IOVVANS NEIGHBORS MARCH 21 1915 PUSH 4 MILES BEYOND RHINE INSIDE WASHINGTON Tokyo Radio Hysterical After Yank Bombing Raids Central Press Capital Staff Washington Washington is watching wjth considerable in terest the results of Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers direct radio ap peal to German army officers to surrender in the light of reports that Field Marshal Gerd von Hundstedt had asked the allies for peace terms Eisenhowers broadcast immedi ately preceded the purported peace overtures and left some military observers wondering whether the appeal was reaping material re sults throughout the German army corps Eisenhowers request to the enemy officers was the first issued by a high allied military official since the war began Its wording however left no doubt that the Casablanca unconditional sur render terms were still applica ble But it stressed the utter fu tility of continued bloodshed by the German army and sought to divide the officer corps and their wellpublicized enemies the nazi party The broadcast was apparently prepared oo with he Eussiau plan ot utilizing captured German officers in mind Soviet authori ties since the siege of Stalingrad have used Generals von Seydlitz and von Paulas on frequent radio programs into the reich urging immediate German surrender Rep Jere Cooper Ten nessee reminded congress that it costs money to wage war He re vealed that as of Jan 31 it has cost the United States 3273982 000000 Cooper said that 95 cents out of every dollar sfcent by the fed eral government these days Is for the costof the war the fiscal year ending June 30 of this year will be over the 000000000 marled Washington is keeping an ear close to Jap radio reports of life in the Kip homeland In spite of the tendency of many Americans to view Oriental actions in Occi dental terms Washington diplo matic and military experts are seeking to determine the impor tance of tvery Japanese decision as it affects the future course of the war in the Pacific There is quite a difference they sar in Jap reactions to American bombing than is found in German radio broadcasts Tipoff on this score came dur ing the 300pIane B29 bombing raid on Tokyo when a Kip radio commentator frantically told his audience that the Americans were making a landing on the home land The nazis on the other hand are thorough stolid and fatalistic and old hands at the game of war Nothing like the Jap reaction eminated from Berlin Meanwhile official Washington watches every enemy word in deadly silence Seldom there been as much advance interest in elections as there is in congress in the con gressional elections of 1946and the presidential race in 1D48 This interest springs from the realiza tion of politicians that the nation is at the crossroads of great deci sions which may deciue the future pattern of America They also sense that President Roosevelts grip on the electorate may slip by the lime 1946 or 1948 rolls around There is a wide spread belief in congress that the 4th term will be Mr Roosevelts last regardless of his own plans that his health simply will not permit him to carry on beyond the present 4 years As for the republicans they see an opportunity to capture control of the house and possibly the senate in 1946 Democratic candi dates for the house will be minus FDRs voting support and prestige next year they point out And the democrats have a feel ing there will be at least 3 aspir ants few the democratic presiden tial nomination tn 1948Vice President Harry Truman Secre tary of Commerce Henry A Wal lace and Sen Harry F Byrd of Virginia Weather Finally Joins Allied Cause London weather final ly turned against Hitler in one of the allies big offensive Brilliant sunshine favored1 the allies as they struck across the Rhine into the plain north of the Ruhr In the big operations heretofore Hitler was able to count on an ally when the occasion was crucial But Saturday it was different Nazis Say Reds Attacking FromTOder REACH GOLZOW IN FIRST PHASE OF OFFENSIVE Over 1 Million Men Massed Along River for All Out Attack London The Germans said Saturday that Marshal Gregory Zhukovhad attacked with strongest forces from his Oder bridgeheads as part of a decisive drive on Berlin With perhaps 1200000 men massed along the Oder and ready to join in a multiple eastwest al lied assault to crush the fast breath out of the reich Zhukov threw 6 infantry divisions waves of tanks and a tremendous artil lery barrage into the new attack on both sides of Kuestrin and suc ceeded in reaching a point only 31 miles from the German capital German broadcasts reported Marshal Stalin announced a new Russian offensive in Hun gary and said soviet forces had advanced 44 miles on a front of more than 63 miles and captured numerous communication points including Szekesfehervar Mor 40 miles west of Budapest Enying Veszprem 25 miles south west of Szekesfehervar and Zirc 26 miles west of Szekesfehervar and 350 other places were cap tured in the advance which placed the Russians 55 miles southwest of Budapest and 59 miles from theAustrian border A Jlhel German high command was attacTrihgfvbm bridgeheads on both sides of Kuestrin and that the stubborn German defense had taken a toll of 204 soviet tanks in 2 days of battle there The Russians reached Golzow 6 miles west of the Oder and 31 miles from Berlin said radio dis patches from the reich and broke into Klessin 8 miles south of Gol zow and 34 miles from Berlin The Germans who claim still to hold a small part of the old city of Kuestrin just south of the Warthe river and east of the Oder despite official soviet announce ments of the capture of the an cient fortress said The battle for Kuestrin has reached its cli max The red army is throwing in all its material regardless of losses of men and tanks This present offensive must be taken in connection with a long planned Russian attack on Ber lin declared a DNB broadcast from Berlin Kuestrin has been cut off from all communications to the west for some time These have how ever been reestablished The fortress still is in German hands Furious fighting continues in this sector There was no confirmation from Moscow of the opening of a new Zhukov attack but the soviet high command announced that he German defenders of the Baltic ports of Gdynia and Danzig had been split by the capture of Zop pot on the coast between thc 2 cities and that the Russians were clamping a huge pincers on thc inner German fortress area of Moravia Bohemia and Vienna in the south Moscow dispatches said the Rus sians had driven into Moravia in Czechoslovakia at several points Nazi broadcasts said waves of Russian infantry and tanks had smashed through German de fences along the BerlinOder riv er line and had speared to Golzow on the main KuestrinBerlin trunk railroad Thc naiis asserted they stalled the red army drive with a coun terattack at Golzow but said the Russians hit back later and a swaying indecisive battle was in progress A thunderous 90minute artil lery barrage and attacks by hun dreds of soviet dive bombers were said to have preceded the assault into which Berlin declared Mar shal Gregory K Zhukovs 1st White Russian army threw 400 tanks and 72000 troops Thc major Russian offensive against Berlin is immediately at hand said a Berlin report to the German controlled STB agency in Stockholm London sources ex pressed the belief Zhukov had massed 100 divisions possibly 1200000 men for a climactic drive on Berlin Approximately 250 miles north west of the Berlin front Marshal Konstantin K Rokossovskys 2nd White Russian army halved thc DanzigGydnia pocket fay ram ming a 3mile wedge to the bay of Danzig midway between the big naval bases Report Japs Fleeing Into Luzon Hills Manila UR Japanese troops were reported fleeing into the western Luzon hills Saturday be fore American 33rd division forces which overran Naguilian and its airfield and thrust to less than 10 miles from the enenv stronghold of Baguip Naguiiian which had a prewar population of 15000 was taken against only minor resistance Its airfield provided antther base for Gen Douglas MacAithurs bomb ers which sank or damaged 11 more Japanese ships including 2 destroyers and a minesweeper in nenattacks through the China sea The Japanese had blown up the 250yard bridge across the Nagui lian river and the American troops were forced to wade across the river to reach the town A rolling artillery barrage blasted a path for the advancing troops and they met little opposi tion in pushing into Naguitian Wednesday One heavy artillery shell scored a direct hit on a Jap anese ammunition dump causing an explosion that racked the earth for several miles A front report said the Japanese around Naguilian were fleeing into the hills before riflemen under the command of Lt Col Arthur Collins Boston Mass The thrust carried the 33rd di vision to less than 10 miles from Baguio former Philippines sum mer capital and headquarters for Japanese forces in the Philippines There were no further reports of another American column which last was jevealed only6 mites south of the Bitter fightiug continued in northcentral Luzon where Amer ican troops were closing a 2way drive on Balete Pass escape route into the Cagrayan valley Four sharp counterattacks were re pulsed by the Yanks as they moved within 4 miles north and south of the pass In the fighting east of Manila the 43rd division advanced to one mile from the town of New Boso boso east of the shattered Japa nese Shimbu line while the 6th division steadily compressed en emy pockets at the northern efed of the line against machinegun and mortar fire On southern Luzon the 125th combat regiment cleared the en emy from Cucnca and Mt Maco lod southeast of Lake Taal and pushed on to Dita 2 miles north east of Cuenca Mitchell medium bombers hit Cebu and Negros adjoining Amer icancontrolled Panay in the cen tral Philippines for the second straight day Wednesday Ninety tons of bombs were dropped near Cebu City and on Negros Liberators unloaded another 80 tons of explosives on Formosa while Mitchells maintained the blockade of Japanese shipping through the China sea WPBlHiEFl SUPPORT CURFEW Will Withhold Essential Material From Offenders Washington Produc tion Chief J A Krvig is preparing to throw the full weight of his agency behind the enforcement of the midnight curfew on amuse ment places it was learned Sat urday Krug is empowered by the 2nd war powers act to withhold build ing materials electricity coal and gas from consumers if he consid ers such action necessary to aid the war effort War Mobilizer James F Byrnes at the time he decreed that bars movies and other places of enter tainment should close at 12 oclock asked Krug to help en force the curfew The WPB chairman however took no action to back up Byrnes request until this week when pians were drawn up to crack down on curfew violators Kruff is expected to warn movie houses bars and others who are still cateringto postmidnight pleasure seekers that they will face the ire of WPB if they arent shut up tight by 12 oclock WLB will thus join the war manpower ac cepted the job of administering the nightlife ban with something less than obtain ing compliance with an order that may well take its place as the most unpopular nationwide edict since prohibition PONTOON BRIDGE SPANS RHINEA tank foreground and other vehicles in back ground cross the Bhne river in Germany on a pontoon bridge War department censor ship prevents disclosure of location of this bridge AP wirephoto Tokyo Reports Hundreds of Carrier Planes Hit Okinawa 300 Miles South of Japan Guam UP Tokyo reported that hundreds o American carrier planes attacked Okinawa island enemy naval and air base 300 miles southwest of Japan Friday evening and Saturday Some 230 planes opened the assault late Friday and other forma tions carried it into a 2nd day with raids still continuing after 8 hours Saturday Japanese casts said Miyako island 180 miles south west Okinawa and only 210 miles northeast of Formosa also was under attack Saturday Tokyo said The planes presumably came from the 5th fleet with Vice Adm Marc A Mitschers force of a dozen or more carriers fresh from at least 731 Japanese plaiies and damaging warships in attacks on Kyushu and Japans inland sea Sunday and Monday in air battles to the south Tuesday and Wednesday Tokyo apparently seeking to justify the new raids in the light of earlier claims hat Japanese planes had broken up the fleet with the sinking of 11 warships said Okinawa and ftliyako were being attacked by a new enemy task force The new force with 2 or 3 air craft carriers as its nucleus ap peared off Okinawa Friday Tokyo said Earlier Tokyo broad casts had reported Mitschers force approaching the waters east of Okinawa Wednesday night however Todays raids began at 7 a m Tokyo Japanese broad casts said and still were continu ing at 3 p m Okinawa lies midway between Japan proper and Formosa in the Hyukyu island chain and is an important link in the belt of air and sea bases protecting the southern approaches to the enemy homeland The task force which struck at he inland sea earlier this week Tokyo insisted was reported in flight near Fork gulf 600 miles east of Formosa with the greater part of Us carrier units smashed ly the Japanese attackers Capt Etsuo Kuihara chief of the Japanese navys press section boasted in a Tokyo broadcast that a the American task force again should appear off Japan well deal them another crushing blow At the same time however he added that the force did not con stitute Americas total fighting strength by any means The air altack heavy though it was not decisive he said Adm Chester W Nimitz com mander of the Pacific fleet brought the number of enemy planes wrecked by the 5th fleet Sunday through Wednesday to 731 in a communique adding 156 to the 575 listed originally as de stroyed or damaged Revised fijrures he said showed that 281 Japanese planes had been shot down 275 destroyed on the ground and 175 probably de stroyed or damaged on the ground Though he did not revise the total of 17 warships crippled in the inland sea Nimitz said recon naissance indicated the planes also had caused extensive dam age to 7 major air bases on Kyu shu southernmost of the Japa nese home islands DEATH PENALTY Des Moines by lethal gas instead of by hanging m Iowa would be permissible under an amendment filed Friday by Sen A D Clem R Sioux The amendment was filed to a bill by Sen George Faul R Des Moines to abolish the death penalty Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy FOOD SITUATION MORE CRITICAL Hundred Million Now on Allies Washington UR The world food situation has reached a most critical state with de mands upon the united nations continuing to pile in British of ficials here said Saturday Already a hundred million more people are depending on the united nations for food as a re sult of liberation the officials stated adding There will be mil lions more The British statement was made at a time when the American pub lic has been told it may have to tighten its belt to send food to starving people of other countries A food official of this country said the United States must be considered the principal source from which relief food can be drawn Other nations are in no position to increase their exports he declared There have been strong objec tions raised to feeding others while this countrys own food sup ply is reputedly in bad shape A special senate subcommittee will begin hearings Monday in an ef fort to find out just what the food situation really is and what needs to be done about it The subcommittee will take up hemeat problem first looking into reports that there are record herds of live cattle on the ranges but liltfe meat on American tables Meantime the administration has instituted a new cattle subsidy program intended to spur slaugh tering and bring more beef into maikefs And Friday Economic Stabilizer William H Davis auth orized price increases on young chickens effective July 1 intended to bring more broilers frjers and roasters to market by early Au gust at a slightly higher cost to housewives The British statement declared that world food production and shipping facilities are stretched to the limit yet the demands keep on piling in Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Scattered showers and thunderstorms Saturday night and Sunday Cooler Sun day Rather windy Iowa Scattered showers and thunderstorms Saturday night and Sunday Cooler in west and central portions Sunday Rather windy Minnesota Occasional showers Saturday night and Sunday Mild Saturday night cooler Sun day except near Lake Superior Hather windy IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 70 Minimum Friday 50 At 8 a m Saturday 53 YEAR AGO Maximum 51 Minimum 33 Churchill Says Rhine Last Obstacle London decisive vic tory in Europe will be near once the Rhine river line is pierced and the crust of German resistance broken Prime Minister Churchill declared Saturday in a message to Field Marshal Sir Montgom erys armies Churchills message said I rejoice to be with the chief of the imperial general staff Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke at Field Marshal Montgomerys headquar ters of the 21st army group during this memorable battle of forcing the Rhine British soldiers it will long be with ourCanadian brothers and valiant United States allies this superb task was accom plished Once the river line is pierced and the crust of German resistance is broken the decisive victory in Europe will be near May God prosper our arms in this noble adventure after our long struggle for king and coun try for dear life and for the free dom of mankind Montgomery addressed this mes sage to all 21st army group troops 1 On the 7th of February 1 told you we were going into the ring for the final and last round There would be no time limit We would continue fighting until our opponent was knocked out The last round is going very well on both sides of the over head 2 In he west enemy has lost the Rhiiicland and with it the flower of at least 4 the parachute army the 5th panzer army loth army and 7th army The 1st army farther to the south is now being added to the list In the Rhineland battles the enemy has lost about 150000 pris oners and there are many more to come His total casualties amount to about 250000 since the 8th ot February 3 Tn the cast the enemy has lost all of Tomcrania cast of the Oder an area as large as the Rhincland and 3 more German annics have been routed Russian armies are within about 35 miles of Berlin 4 Overhead allied air forces me pounding Germany diy and night It will be interesting to see hovmuch longer the Germans can stand it 5 The enemy in fact has been driven into a comer and he can not escape Events are moving rapidly The complete and decisive de feat of the Germans is certain there is no possibility of doubt on this matter 6 The 21sl army group will now cross the Rhine The enemy possibly thinks he is safe behind this great river ob stacle We will agree it is a great obstacle but we will show the en emy he is far from safe behind it This great allied fighting machine composed of integrated land and air forces will deal with the prob lem in no uncertain manner 7 And having crossed the Rhine we will crack about in the plains of northern Germany chas ing the enemy from pillar to post The swifter and more energetic our action the sooner the war will be over And that is what we all desire to get on with the job and finish off the German war as soon as possible 8 Over the Rhine then let us go And good hunting to you all on the other side British Enter Wesel Sky Troops in North Earis allied armies won virtually all of a 25 mile stretch across the lower Rhine Saturday in and north of the rich Ruhr valley elmins up to 4 miles beyond the river in a mighty land and airborne offensive bidding for final victorv this spring The U S 9th army crossed the river 2 miles south of the Kuhr city of Wesel and advanced 3 to 4 miles north east of theriver capturing several small towns The 2nd army captured more than 1500 prisoners and fought into AVese anil Rees The allied 1st uirbornc army landed northeast of Xanlen in the largest sky invasion in history Sliding and parachuting to earth Bombers Hit Rhine Area Ruhr Berlin London armada of 3 SOU war planes from Britain smashed at Germany Saturday and heavy bombers from Italy in a 1500 mile round longest escorted operation ever flown over Berlin A total of 1500 transport planes and gliders showered n eroat arniy on ground east of thc Rhine The ftalybased 15th air force heavy bombers which attacked in dustrial targets in the Berlin area were escorted by Mustangs The light of the huge skybattle fleet from England with the planes flying winglip to wingtip one of the most aiveinspiring aerial operations of the war and in the Ruhr valley a devastating scourge was laid doivn In the huge armada were 1800 American bombers and lighters which hammered 12 nazi airfields and carried out searing missions across the battle zone More than 200 Liberators drop ped supplies to the first allied air borne army east of the Rhine in the first aerial provisioning of the advanced forces observers who had ob served the transchannel air tral iic throughout the war said they never had seen such a spectacular display of aerial might Bombers fighters gliders and transport planes by the thousands swarmed toward the Rhine front and back agam One of the days first operations reported was an assault by more than 1050 8tb air force heavies on 12 German air fields north of the Ruhr Returning crewmen said thc fields east of the Rhine in the Wesel area were dotted with al lied gliders The entire German country side east of the Rhine was afire and you could sec gun Clashes in every direction said Maj John Millet of New Britain Conn Planes were everywhere beneath us strafing and diving Millet said thc Liberators ivilh which he flew came home over the most terrific crouiid battle I ever hope to sec Capt Louis Wieser of Ham mond Ind a Liberator crewman said hundreds of allied fighters were diving and gunning over a tremendous battle The ground surface east of the Rhine was covered by planes that looked like clidcrs said 1st Lt Charles Shinim of Bartlesville Ok la Harry Hickinbotham United Press correspondent at Folkestone reported Crowds fathered oil he sea front beginning at dawn to watch Hie biggest air armadas of the warl sweep across the channel r never nave seen so many airplanes pass over this town on any one set of operations during he last 5 years of war Without exaggeration there must have been thousands of planes going out since dawn over a very short stretch ot coast Front dispatches said allied planes blasted 30 targets in and north of the Ruhr Friday and dozens of towns and villages blazed like torches all night In the days first announced strike by thc American heavies more than 850 fighters went along on escort duty and to patrol over northwest Germany Most of the air fields attacked were jetpropelled fighter bases The fields were at Hopslen Ach mer Vcchta Vcchtcl Rheine Hesepe Nordhorn Ateenwijk Zwischenhahn Plantlunne Vaar elbusch and Varrell It was the 4th straight day of i aerial assault on the Ruhr and its I cned for the Rhine drive from an enormous sky train more than 500 miles long Up to 30000 sky troops landed after 10 a m Also in the attack were ele ments of the Canadian 1st army The lining was being bridged Field Marshal Montgomerys on slaught following closely behind Rhine crossings of the U and 3rd armies farther S 1st south BULLETIN Washington compromise manpower control bill stripped of the labor draft provisions advocat ed by the house was approved by thc joint conference committee of senators and representatives Sat urday gained power every moment Casu alties were light German resist ance was spotty The enemy has been driycn iulo a corner and he cannot es cape Montgomery said in an or der of the day The complete and decisive defeat of the Germans is Montgomery announced the German commander at Wesel at the northwest corner of the Ruhr was captured Maj Gen Deutsch commanding flak batteries in the area was killed The first identified bridgeheads were at Recs across from Zanten Troops captured Bislich on thc cast side of the barrier river Between 20000 and 30000 para chute troops of Lt Gen Lewis H Brerelons allied 1st airborne army floated to earth behind Ger man lines ou brightly colored parachutes and in gliders American Troops Say This Is It li S 1st Army Across the Rhine allied assaults on the western front have wiped out Rhine river defenses and Gen Eisenhowers armies now stand on the threshold of complete vic tory over Germany This is the feeling along this urmy front Saturday night Not in two and a half years of xvar has such optimism prevailed among troops and officers as that which is cheering soldiers hearing news of new crossings on the Rhine against light enemy resist hat This was the 3rd and perhaps decisive crossing of thc Rhine All arms of the allies participated IVesel an industrial railhead of thc Ruhr basin and a city of 25 000 is 32 miles northwest of Dues seldorf Kecs a town of 4500 sur rounded still by remains of its ancient walls is 11 miles down river to he northwest Captured Bislich is a half mile east of the river and nearly midway between Wcsel and Kccs and opposite Zantcii The tremendous artillery bar rage preceding the assault and air landings across thc Rhine made iition relatively light jomerys headquarters said borne hundreds of prisoners were taken Thc tremendous artillery bar rage preceding the assault and air landings across thc Rhine made opposition relatively light Montgomerys headquarters said Some hundreds of prisoners were taken Enemy forward positions were not strongly held and more pow erful forces and more mobile re serves have yet to be mut Thc Germans were fighting in old style trenches welt east of the ruins o the conquered Siegfried line Before this 3rd Rhine crossing was the north German plain as broad as Kansas and as long as Pennsylvania Elements of at least 6 of Gen Eisenhowers armies were fight iiiff cast of thc Rluiie and 3 other armies were available Across the river were the American 1st 3rd anil 9th armies thc allied first ic the British 2nd and Ca MINISTER DIES Des Moincs Rev Carl Brown 76 Des Moincs who had been an active member the lowaDes Moines Methodist church conference for 52 years died at a Des Moines hospital Friday after a long illness Buy thc Palatinate with its captured capital Spcycr The French 1st army was in the Palatinate and along the upper Rhine Whereabouts of the U S 15th army was not yet reported Below the Ruhr 1st and 3rd army troops of Lt Gen Omar N Bradleys 12th army group were bulging out their bridgeheads swiftly in what appeared to be a prelude to a breakout 5our War Bonds and There every reason to h m OobcGazctlc be optimistic over the success ol ooy thc ncw crossinK norlh of lhe SMJl   

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