Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - March 19, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL LI One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary by W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KGLO Muon CHy Buudl m KSCJ SIoui City Sundiy y m WOI Ames a m Iowa City Vffiuttity 1K f la WTAD quincr 111 Thnradiy p m Are We Getting All the War News IN my last commentary I gave my attention to some of the questions most frequently put to me since my return from a 2 months visit in the European war theater The show of interest pro duced by that commentary prompts me to cook up something else from the same recipe And well start with a query that has come to me at almost every question and answer period Ive conducted in connection with my reports to a hundred audi ences or so Are we radio listeners and newspaper readers here at home really getting all the war news My answer to that is we are getting all the essential but very often the time we get it is determined by considerations of military security No war in history hasbeen reported as ably or as completely as this theres still the matter of military security NEWSPAPERS and war corre spondents and this goes for the radio well as our mili tary authorities are committee to the all important fundamental idea that NO NEWS STORY IS WORTH HAZARDING THE LIFE OF A FIGHTING BOY TT occurs to me that perhaps I can get this whole picture to you best by letting you join me in a talk with Don Whitehead one of the APs most brilliant war cor respondents He has made 5 am phibious landings He has cov ered major campaigns in Africa Sicily Italy France Belgium Holland and Germany itself He cently he was home on leave Now hes back in Germany During his distinguished and extended service he has talked thousands of allied soldiers know of nobody better qualified by ability antf experience to dis cuss sponsibilities to the men carrying the burdensof battle or to the people on the homefront who are dependent upon him and other correspondents for their under standing of the war responsibility says Mr Whitehead is to give an honest accurate unvarnished re port of war as we see the limits of military security That phrase within the limits of military security creates the strains and stresses and themajor MASON CtlY IOWA MONDAY MARCH 19 1945 Associated press ma United Pms FuU Leased Wiro ConsfaU of Two SectionsSection One jjg NAZIS FLEEING TOWARD RHINE Carrier Planes Over Osaka Kobe NAGOYABLAZES AFTER BOMBER difficulties front of reporting at the Every war reporter has in fact 2 responsibility to the fighting men and a re sponsibility toward the public which reads his dispatches Ana when those responsibilities clash as they sometimes do then the first takes precedence because our duty to the troops comes first They are the ones who are doine the dying v Mr Whitehead ex yj plained information is with held from the public because of censorship restrictions designed to protect the lives of soldiers bv withholding valuable information from the enemy At the same time however he adds the correspond ent has a duty to give the people at home the clearest possible pic ture of what their sons and hus bands and fathers are doing how the war is progressing Frequently declared this sea soned AP correspondent we ar Kue with censors on what consti tutes security We often think stones are held or deletions made when no real security is involved this is the point al ready mentioned by also know and live with the realiza tion that no story is worth the life of an American soldier And tnats why a good many stories remain in our notebooks unwrit ten TT isnt always easy to defin where security begins or ends m reporting on the war This is a truth known not only to war cor respondents but to telegraph and news editors in any newspaper office This is illustrated by a personal experience related by Mr Whitehead as follows On my way home from Ger many I wrote 2 stories in Paris on the bitterness of the fightine to bring out STRIKE SUNDAY Tokyo Claims Sinking of Carrier Several Ships in Task Force Guam said wave alter wave of U S ravy planes at tacked the factorypacked Osaka Kobe area for at least9 hours Monday sending a powerful car rierbased assault on Japan through its 2nd straight day Only 85 miles to the east Na biggest aircraft center and 3rd goya Japans manufacturing largest city still was ablaze from a preaaun attack early Sunday by 325 to 350 Superfortresses greatest B29 armada of the war A Japanese communique issued shortly after 3 p m Tokyo time said carrier planes had been at tacking the Hanshin district Japanese name for the Osaka Kobe Shikoku island to the southwest since Monday morning the fact that we were taking heavy losses with heavier losses to come But because it wouldbe giv ing the enemy ralaaWe informa tion lo report the exact number of losses I was forced to fall back on snch cliches as savage fight ing bloody battles and heavy losses terms which unfortun ately have come to mean little to the average reader because he does not interpret in terms of men killed and wound ed WHAT happens when the battle casualties are announced en Pace Z Another Tokyo propaganda broadcast said the raids began at a m and reported that Ky ushu southernmost of the Japa nese home islands also was under attack Kyushu was the main tar get of a force estimated by Tokyo at 1400 carrier planes Sunday The communique claimed that counterattacking Japanese planes had sunk an aircraft carrier a 2nd aircraft carrier or battleship one battleship or cruiser and 2 destroyers in attacks on the American task force southeast of KyushuSunday Another aircraft carrier was damaged heavily the communi que said and 46 planes shot down Damage to ground installations in Sundays 8hour carrier raids on Kyushu Shikoku and southeast Honshu was said to be slight Both Osaka and Kobe identi fied by Tokyo as among Mondays targets wereblasted heavily last week by 300plane armadas of Superfortresses Osaka is Japans 2nd largest city and biggest war production center while Kobe is her main port Huge flames were kindled in Nagoya 165 miles west of Tokyo by 2500 tons or more of incen diaries dropped by the record fleet Superfortresses Sunday One Tokyo broadcast said the fires finally were brought under con trol after Si hours but another indicated they still may not have been controlled The B29s were out to complete the destruction begun last Mon day when 2 square city burned out in a similar raid It was the fifth major fire raid on Japan in 10 days Admiral Chester W Nimitzs Pacific fleet headqnarters was si lent both on the report that the earner planes were attacking southern Japan for a second day and the claim that the task force had been damaged Headquarters confirmed how ever that a strong force of car rier planes presumably from Ad miral Marc A Mitschers famed task force 58 had attacked enemy aircraft and installations on Kyu shu Sunday for the first lime Specific targets on Kyushu were not listed Its most impor tant city the steel center of Ya wata lies at the northern end of the island 500 miles southwest of Tokyo On the west coast are the important naval bases of Na Yanks British Drop 11 Ton Bombs on German Industry to Follow Up Berlin Raid gasaki and Sasebo Tokyo broadcasts said Ku mamoto on the west coast and other cities chiefly in the eastern and southern sectors bore the brunt of Sundays attacks Mal suyaroa on Shikoku and Waka yama prefecture in southwest Honshu also were bombed Tokyo said The enemy estimated the num ber of carrier planes participat ing at 1400 and said during Sun day morning alone 29 of the raid ers had been shot down and 82 damaged Early reports of the Superfor tress attack on Nagoya Japans third largest city and source of nearly half her airplanes and air craft engines indicated that the big bombers caused far more de struction than in the raid last week BOMBED ANTWERP Antwerp Belgium ypjGer man Vbombs were hurled into this great port city for 4 months ending Jan 31 in a concentrated effort to destroy its usefulness as an allied supply base it can now be disclosed parts of Germany Monday The bombardment hit a day after the heaviest raid ol the war on any single German city had wrecked and burned large sections of the concentrated war industries in and around Berlin More than 1200 U S heavy bombers and upward of 600 fight ers hit several targets Monday They included a jet plane plan at Baumenheim 20 miles north Augsburg air fields near Neuberg north of Muenchen and Leipheirr near Ulm industrial targets at Plauen west of Chemnitz in Sax ony and war factories at Jena west of Leipzig Lancasters of the RAF carted 11ton and 6ton bombs to hit railway viaducts at Arnsberg southeast of Hamm and in the area of Bielfeld in the Ruhr area attack on Berlin by upwards of 2000 American planes Sunday cost the 8th air force 25 bombers and 5 fighters A communique reviewing the Berlin raid revealed that the U S planes scattered 3000 tons of bombs through most of the cap itals industries and left them ablaze or littered wreckage Bombs blanketed the entire plant of the sprawling Kheinmetall Borsig plant in the Tegel suburb of Berlin It produces a xride vari ety of war materials including tanks guns bombs and torpedoes Mondays communique said the plant was severely damaged and set afire It covers about 25 city blocks and employs an estimated 25000 persons Large machine and assembly shops smelting furnaces and bjjr bptfabs which blanketed the ehrireplant the communique said There were large explosions and when the bombers turned for home buildings were burning through out the target area The Borsiff armored vehicle fac tory at Hcnningsdorf another Ber lin suburb also suffered heavy damages fo half the plant area In the heart of Berlin heavy concentrations of bombs crashed m the area of the Schlesischer railway station and hits were scored on the north station freight yards Neutral correspondents in the devastated German capital were forbidden to send out anything except the bare official announce ment that Berlin had been bombed Stockholm reports h o w e v e r said more Beriiners had been Killed or injured in the raid than in any previous attack gn the city The clandestine radio Atlantic broadcast to Germany an account of fearful destruction and casual lies Scores of houses collapsed buryins their inhabitants alive broadcast said Those who fled from their cel lars to avoid asphyxiation by smoke were set afire themselves by the burning asphalt of streets and sidewalks Atlantic said A lumber of persons jumped into the Spree river to extinguish ther flaming clothes and drowned Japs Admit Loss of Iwo Jima to Americans By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS han Francisco Mon day admitted the loss of Iwo Jima The government controlled Tokyo radio reported the Japa nese garrison made their last general attack at midnight Sat urday after one month of bitter resistance The broadcast recorded by the federal communications commis sion sajd marines had gradually broKen through defense positions and consequently the communi cations have more or less the ten dency to stop Weather Report FORECAST Iona Mason City partly cloudy and cooler Monday night Tues day increasing cloudiness with rising temperature Monday night 25 L o we s t SIEGE FORGES DRIVE WEDGE INTO ALTDAMM Capture of Stronghold Will Secure Zhukovs Flank for Big Assault London UP Russian siege forces have driven a wedge al most a mile into the main defenses of Altdamm fortress city on the east bank of the Oder before Stet tin the Germans reported Mon day The soviet assault on the last German toehold east of the lower Oder at Altdamm entered its final phase Russian victory there will secure Marshal Gregory K Zhu kovs flank for the biff push on Berlin Moscow dispatches reported that after the capture of the big port of Kolberg 63 miles northeast of Stettin the Baltic coast was clear from Stettin bay to the suburbs of besieged Gdynia Soviet dispatches said fighting went on unabated along the cen tral Oder front before Berlinand in Silesia although the retd army of nazt reportsthat the Rus sians were across the Oder in force and gathering strength for a frontal assault on the capital Ernst von Hammer Berlin radio commentator said Zhukov had thrown fresh infantry Into the at tack on the Altdamm bridgehead The Russians attacked as many as 15 times in separate sectors be fore the foivn von Hammer said without forcing a substantial change in the tacticalsituation The troops drilling in from the southeast penetrated almost a mile into the main German fighting zone von Hammer said adding the customary propaganda claim that they were sealed oft In extreme southern Silesia von Hammer reported a 2pronged battle between Breslau and Rati bor reached a climax The Soviets kept on the pressure in attempts to link up armored forces advanc ing from the east and north The Germans were credited with violent attacks on the flanks of a Russian salient west of the Oder in the area of Oppcln sooth of Breslau The capture of Kolberg gave the Russians their first major open Baltic port since they seized Me mel in East Prussia in late Janu ary The 3rd White Russian army gained up to 3 miles in East Prus sia and reduced the Koenigsberg pocket to 275 miles square A 2nd East Prussian pocket a few miles to the west was whittled down to 165 square miles AMERICANS DRIVE TO CLOSE SAAR rows locate main drives of American forces along the west ern front heavy solid The U S 1st army battled along the superhighway east of the Remagen bridgehead and the 3rd army units were mopping up in Coblenz bther artnrtroopsserrt an armored column to the Nahe rivei nandtookaierzig on the west whileto the armydrove throughSiegfriedline defenses east of Saarbruecken Officials Say Rhine Bridge Will Be in Operation Soon w H COWAN AND DON WHITEHEAD With the Americans Across the Rhine Ludendorff whose central span collapsed Saturday can be repaired and St nrob ably wll be in operation again soon as a vital lifeline supporting US 1st armv nnprattnnc wi u 3 1st army operations east of Rhine river That was the view expressed by V S army officials who declared that ioss of the structure even temporarily would not affect the 1st armys ability to hold its bulging bridgehead across the wa ter barrier The American broadcasting station in Europe in a dispatch recorded by CBS said the bridge has been almost completely re paired There was no confirma tion from allied headquarters The collapse was blamed on a weakened main supporting girder that had been damaged by an en emy demolition charge before the Americans captured the 1200foot railroad span on March 7 About 200 army engineers worlc ing on the bridge were plunged into the Rhine 70 feet below when the centra span gave way with a rumble and shudder Many were rescued There was no official tally of the dead and injured swept toward the pontoon bridge north of the original crossing site Many were injured Some were horribly mangled and pinned be tween steel girders Others were buried in debris under the water Red Cross vehicles streamed to ward the structure and an aid station was set vp Capt George Barber of Montebello Cal a divi sion chaplain administered last rites to the dyinir MacNiders Group Makes New Landing Manila Liber ators bombed Formosa for the 5th consecutive day Friday unload ing a record 300 tons of high ex plosives on the island fortress without interception it was an nounced Monday More than 70 of the heavy bombers flying from new Philip pines bases carried out the latest phase of the campaign to neu tralize Formosa only TOO miles southwest of Japans home is lands MacArthurs communique re ported continued gains by his troops throughout the Luzon cam paign In another shorcfosliore am phibious operation the I58th reci raental combat team under Brig Gen Hanforrt MacNider of Ma son City swept around the Ca lumnan peninsula in southwestern Luzon landed unopposed at Tal asa anil joined up with other U S Iroops at Mabinl In the 5 days ot raids on For mosa Gen Douglas MacArthurs bombers have dumped a total of 825 tons of bombs on air bases and vital war plants on the is land lying strategically between the northwest corner ot the Philip Pines and the China coast The Japanese failed to ptit up single interceptor against the last attack which started large fires at the Heito and Okayama air bases and the supply and re pair shops near Taihoku The raid followed an assault the pre vious day by Thunderbolt fighter bombers on the electric plant at Tokoon Formosas southern tip CBS recorded an Australian broadcast which said the Tokyo radio Monday noted a sharp In crease in the number of planes raiding Formosa front American bases in the Philippine Tokyo said the task of bombing Formosa apparently had been switched from the 14th air force in China to MacArthur forces Another contingent of Liber ators at the same time spread 337 tons through the Japanese de fenses at Baguio former Philip pines summer capital in northern Luzon where American troops were steadily compressing the en emy forces The Japanese attempted several counterattacks on the new Amer ican positions at Mabini near the west coast of Baiayan Bay but s Philippines oil were repulsed The 6th and 43rd divisions pontoon bridge to pull men from the water Inthe middle of the rescue operations a German shell landed nearby and fragments cut down several men Censorship permitted disclosure In CzechoSlovafcia Marshal of the collapse about Des Moi R o d i o n TT Malinovskys 2nd the 5ame Ume lho German high I Of Cedar R Ukrainian army captured 5 towns command announced that 4 Monrfav man nfrfVrtc t lllUIIUlly di Cedar Flood Waters Reach Cedar Rapids and villages and drew up to or near the Hron river 112 miles cast of Vienna on a 15mile front There still was no news from the Berlin front but Moscow said a soviet analyst a few days ago ikened the situation before the nazi capital to a gathering new storm man officers had been executed for cowardice or negligence in w permitting the bridge to be intact were under water rest of the flooded iver which for nearly a 3d harassed the northeast of the state moved down maintained steady pressure in th drive east of Manila and pushed wedges info the secondary de fenses of the Japanese Shimbu line in the upper Bosoboso river valley The advance carried 5 miles east of Antipoio and was rapidly en veloping the enemys entire south ern flank in the Marakina hills Units of the 43rd division prob ing near Tanay on the northeast shore of Laguna Bay encountered the first Japanese cavalry seen on Luzon The mounted enemy troops fled into the mountains after some 3RDARMYTANK DIVISIONS PUSH NEARER MAINZ Threaten to Cut Off 80000 Germans Trying to Retreat From Saar Paris estimated 80000 Germans ran for the Rhine Mon day in desperate daylight retreat under perfect strafing weather which turned the northern halt the Bavarian Palatinate into a slaughter ground and the rich Saarland into a death trap Swift tank and infantry columns of the 3rd ana 7th armies surged within 15 miles of each other be tween St Uendel and the Zwei bruecken areas of the Saarland and within 42 miles of a junction farther east of the Palatinate Tanks shot within 14 miles of Mainz on the bend of the Rhine This was the last debacle west of the Rhine and the German 1st and 7th armies were losing ter rific numbers of men and ma chines in their rout Lt Gen George S Pattons 3rd army threatened the great Rhine valley cities of Mainz Frankfurt on the Main Weisbaden Ludwigs hafen and Mannheim His assault troops crushed into St Wendel closing all but the eastern end of a death box 25 miles long and 15 miles wide along the whole Saar line From the south Lt Gen Alex ander M Patchs 7th army jabbed through lie Siegfried line east of Saarbrucckcn and pushed into Wis scmbpurg and the French corner town of Lautertourg a bare 9 miles from Karlsruhe Between them Patton and Patch were using at least 27 divisions hard hitting and heavily armored of abpm 380000 troops North of the 2 powerful assault armies the 1st army fought slow ly to expand its 13 by 8 Hhuie bridgehead beyond the col lapsed but repairable Ludendorff bridge at Remagen Lt Gen Courtney H Hodges warriors were within 17 miles of the Ruhr and hard upon the edge of flat tank country leading to that greatest of European indus trial centers The famous 4th armored sion captured Sprcndlingcn arid moved closest to Mainz and Lt Gen George S Paltons 10th ar mored division sprinted within 19 miles northwest of Kaiserslautcrn a key German base of 61000 in the Palatinate The 7th army moving more slowly but up to 6 miles a day hrough Siegfried line fortitica ions between besieged Saar bruecken and the Rhine closed within 26 miles of Kaisersloutern The 3rd army captured Dillingcii and its great steel mill and crashed into St Wendel only 16 miles from 7th irmy troops fighting in the Zweibruecken area A meeting of the armies would trap all Ger mans in the Saarbruecken area and along the Saar river where virtually all the Saar steel mills are located This trap within the larger trap west of the Rhine would virtually conquer the whole compact Saar iand leaving only the Palatinate lo the Germans west of he Rhine AmerCan The German retreat cars in pursuit 1 fused and disorderly that tanks Failure to replace or repair the m from the vicinity of Water nnrt ge at Cedar Rapids damaged girder in time was the real reason for loss of Ihe bridge but until a full investigation If ready under way is completed to Mnnrt mormne 164 feet 13 I nOV normai nnd 34 above flood level Army engineers there was some reluctance 10 i j J Place any responsibility I a crest ot I72 by Mon Two engineering units were working on when the Red Cross ropre 1312foot central spaa Thief Rifles Newsmen s PI 1 CV 1 T 1 i 512foot central spaa crashed into cities along j UeSKSbtealS TobaCCO i One had the job oi nVCr lo do rehabilitation work the superficial structure repaired evacuai Minnesota Partly cloudy Monday night and Tuesday and warmer IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette Weather Statistics Maximum Saturday 58 Minimum Saturday 35 Maximum Sunday 61 Minimum Sunday 36 At 8 a m Monday 3g YEAR AGO Galesburg HI ap iarent lack of knowledge of news nens finances a thief ransacked he desk drawers of the editorial and composing rooms of the Gal esburg RegisterMail Managin Editor Walter Vf Whipple fared worst with the loss of B cigars A package of cigarets was taken rom the desk of City Editor Casey left in the composing FIRES STOPPED Jefferson City Mo which destroyed thousands of acres of oak trees and threatened villages and communications lines in this region have been extin guished by rains the stale forester reported Monday repaired so traffic could cross while a unit of specialists had been given the task of repairing the basic struc ture But first consideration by ne cessity was given to the task of building up the bridgehead and throwing over supplementing pontoon spans It is across these pontoon spans that men and ma terial must go until the bridge is repaired but these are easy prey for floods common Rhine in the spring along the The entire steel framework of the railroad bridge collapsed with the stone piers and the approach es remaining leading from intact A the center section to the east bank went under water and the section to the west side fell partly on the bank and partly in shallow water Maximum i Minimum 23 10 carrier boy yonr War Bonds and j uuuueu vu u from your GlobeGazette weakly to swirling in tions in areas where the river has not nit its crest Water was over the first floor r homes in1 Waterloo where registration of evacuated families at Red Cross headquarters started Sunday Rob ert Edson Red Cross disaster re lief director said he expected registration would continue sev eral days Betty Schmidt supervisor ot the Red Cross disaster staff ar rived here to assume charge of rehabilitation of needy families affected by the flood An esti families have been mated 300 evacuated Dorothy Anderson general field representative has been sent to Cedar Rapids to assist the Red Cross chapter there where fami lies may have to be moved when the Cedar river hit its peak Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette current They were carrier boy GERMAN BATTERY WRECKED NEAR COBLENZVe hicles of the U S 3rd armys 4th armored division pass the wreckage of a German battery of 20 mm antiaircraft guns used in an attempt to halt the American advance alonir a road to the Rhine river near Coblenz Germanv   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication