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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 6, 1945 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 6, 1945, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OF STOHV AND ARCHIVES HO I NilS THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS TOLU Jffftt mnt United Frea Full Leased Vira Cents m Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY FEBRUARY 6 IMS This Paper Consists of Two NO 193 INSIDE WASHINGTON Congressman Lea Continues Struggle for Vote Reform Central Tien CiplUl SUM Clarence F Lea D of California refuses to concede defeat in his 17 year old light in congress to abolish the electoral college Like the late Senator George W Norris of Nebraska who strove for years before he obtained enact ment of the 20th amendment abol ishing lame duck congresses Lea will try again He has reintroduced for the llth time since 1927 his resolution lor a constitutional amendment pro viding for the election of the president and vice president by direct vote of the people The reso lution he introduced last year failed to get even to first base However Lea who has been it congress since 1916 appeared somewhat more optimistic of ob taining results in the present con gress than he did in the old 78t1 congress whichadjourned Dec IE For onething Rep Herbert C Bonner D of North Carolina ha promised to hold public hearing on Leas proposal before his com imttee on election of presiden vice president and representative in congress Ill be glad to give mm a pub lic hearing on his proposal said Bonner Thats an American privilege and I aim to keep it that The hearings may be held early this session Two of Leas resolutions got as far as the house calendar being unanimously approved by the committee but failed to get tie right of way from the house rules almost essential REDS GROSS ODER IN 3 PLAGES Japs Fire Center of Manila MACARTHUR SAYS OFFICIAL FALL OF MANILA Complete Destruction of Japanese Garrison Said to Be Imminent way committee an Manila F I business district of Manila was in flames Monday night as trapped Japa nese soldiers put the torch to the prerequisite to a house vote The Lea amendment would do away with presidential electors but would give each state electoral votes equal to the number of presidential electors now granted by the constitution The outstanding feature of this proposal explained Lea is that instead of creditingall the elec toral votes of each state to the plurality candidate as at present it would divide them between the candidates in each state in exact proportion to their popular vote therein The candidate receiving the highest electoral vote in the aggregate vote of the nation would Escolta district The Manila fire department was doing its best to halt spread of the fire but Ihere was no water pres sure and the firemen were about helpless The Japanese up water pumping stations several days ago The Escolta Manilas main bus iness street is on the north shore of the Pasig river In prewar days it had such fine structures as the Heacock department store Ham iltonBrowns store and many oth er imposing buildings The trapped Japanese token garrison left in the city was fight ing with savage futility to break the tightening American cordon They left fires and explosions be hind them as they fell back into a death trap Renew Pleas for Enactment of May Bill Washington of War Stimson and UnderSecre tary of War Patterson Tuesday re newed their urgent requests for enactment of a limited national service act Senators emerging from a closed Z hour session of the military af fairs committee considering the proposed act said both officials stressed the importance of such a law as a morale builder for front line fighters Questioned by reporters after the meeting Stimson gave his opinion that recent successesin battle have not made the slight est change regarding the need for the bill Briefing reporters on the meet ing Chairman Thomas Dtltah said Stimson and Patterson both want the bill primarily for morale purposes and secondarily for mili tary and production of which is glorious repetition Patterson was to conclude his testimony Tuesday afternoon Sec retary of the Navy Forrestal as sistant secretary of the navy Bard and Manpower Commissioner Mc Nutt are to testify Wednesday The committees aboutface de cision to have hearings on the housepassed workorjail leg islation raised doubts among some backers that the measure ever will can truthfully saythat the electoral college system tur nishes aj ust mettiod otdecting a president declared not be said that its method of computing votes the will of the American people as expressed by their votes at polls This system is incapable ot doing so accurately at any time The outstanding difficulty of that system he continued is the state unit vote The candidate re ceiving the plurality vote in each state is given its total electoral vote That system prevents minority votes for any candidate m any state from being counted to offset the majority vote of that candi date in other states That is true although the mi nority vote NOT credited to the candidate in one state may greatly exceed his majority vote in an other state In the recent election based on incomplete returns Governor Dewey received 2663487 votes in 10 states for which he received 62 doughboys supported by armorjinwere bearing relent lessly dowivupon the enemy The doomed Japanese suicide units began to destroy the Escolta region Monday night The district also includes many banks and of fice buildings among them the National City Bank of New York MacArthur offl become law As the committee called War Secretary Stimson and Navy Sec retary Forrestal for private testi mony Senator Johnson DColo told reporters that opponents of the bill are definitely In the sad dle It is anybodys guess now whether we will get a bill but he l H i I largest city yet liberated In the Pacific war and raid the motto of his command now was On to Tokyo He said the complete destruc tion of the doomed enemy garri son of Manila was imminent and revealed that another 1350 Amer ican andallied war prisoners and civilian internees had been freed Monday with the capture of an cient BUibid prison Other American forces aveng ing the bitter defeats of 1942 sealed off Bataan peninsula and were believed preparing for an early assault on Fort Corregidor in Manila bay The I fall of Manila marks the end of one great phase of the Pa cific struggle and set the stage for another MacArthur said in a statement accompanying his dally communique With Australia safe the Phil ippines liberated and the ultimate JrtBufV Senator jMayb ant IXr yo electoral votes In New York he redemption of the East Indies and received 2997586 votes for which he received NO electoral votes In other words 334099 votes were received by him in New York in excess of what he received in 10 states yet he received NO elec toral votes from the larger popu lar vote in New York and did re ceive 62 electoral votes from the smaller popular vote The larger popular vote gave him NO elec toral votes the smaller popular vote gave him 62 electoral votes Thus in effect pointed out Lea all minority voles in each state are disfranchised by the fact that their votes are NOT com puted in determining the final re sult Weather Bureau Issues Cold Wave Warning for Iowa Des Moines weather bureau Tuesday issued a special cold wave warning for Iowa It forecast minimum tempera tures ranging from zero in the northwest to 1015 above in the southeast Tuesday night and 5 to 10 below zero in the entire state Wednesday night to for Snow flurries and fresh strong winds forecast Tuesday night and Wednesday followed by clear weather and diminshing winds Wednesday night The state highway commission said highways were slippery be cause of ice or packed snow in the northern half and southwest sec tions of the state They were nor mal in other areas The lowest temperature Mon day night was 10 above at Mason City and the high Monday was 34 at Sioux City PHYSIOLOGIST DIES Baltimore William H Howell 80 internationally known physiologist and one of the early directors of the Johns Hopkins school of hygiene and public health died Tuesday of a heart attack Malaya thereby made a certainty our motto becomes On to Tok i Writing off the eventual loss of Manila Japanese propagandists heard by the FCC said that the coming of the Americans to Ma nila was exactly what our side waited for and our bleeding tac tics will now enter the positive The llth airborne division com pleted the stranglehold on the battered Japanese garrison in Ma nila by smashing into the city from the south Monday after an overnight dash of 35 miles The 37th infantry division pour ing into the capital from the north and the 1st cavalry divi sion from the east linked up in the heart of Manila and cleared all of the city north of the Pasig river with the exception of scat tered groups of snipers The Japanese blew up the Que zon and Ayala bridges across the broad Pasig as they fell back into the southern half of Manila for a last stand Two other bridges re mained intact however and may have been captured by the Ameri cans Japanese demolition squads continued destructive work in southern Manila working fever ishly against their own imminent destruction Numerous fires cast a heavy pall of smoke over the city and explosions shook the ground at frequent intervals With the llth airborne di visions thrust into southern Ma nila however the enemy garrison could be considered hopelessly trapped MacArthnr said The 37th infantry division cap tured Bilibid prison in the north ern half of Manila Monday re leasing more than 800 war pris oners and about 550 additional civilian internees including women and children That brought to more than 5500 the number of allied prisoners res cued in the past week including those at the Santo Tomas univer sity concentration camp in Ma nila and the Cabantuan prison camp in central Luzon and Senator Stewart DTennl in opposing the committee deci sion Monday to have hearings was more optimistic A lot of members undoubtedly feel that no legislation is needed Maybank said but I think the fact that the committee voted for limited bearings rather than pro tracted public hearings shows a majority favors reporting some bill without undue delay Johnson blamed the decision to hold hearings on the war depart ment He said the department publicly endorsed putting manpower place ment under James F Byrnes war mobilization office then secret ly urged that it be placed with local draft boards That gave committee oppon ents a foot In the stirrup and ROW they are in the saddle he de clared If the war department had stayed clear we would have got a bill out Friday Johnson publicly accused the war department Saturday of double crossing As a result he said Undersecretary Patterson telephoned him to say the de partment had made a mistake1 and was standing on its original endorsement for placing the man power controls under Byrnes YANKS SLASH SIEGFRIED TO LAST BASTIONS First Third Armies Advance Farther Into Germany Paris JP Infantry of the American 1st army slashed into the 2nd concrete belt of German fortifications Tuesday to within 1500 yards of Gemund and a half mile of Schleiden last bastion towns of the Siegfried line Just to the north the 78th light ning division drove through the west wall fortifications to within 1500 yards of Schmidt north of the network of dams controlling headwaters of the Roer river Two of the 5 dams have been cap tured The 3rd army fighting 7 miles deep in Germany captured the Siegfried line village of Hab scheid G miles southwest of the fortified communication center of Prum Germans however moved back into Brandscheid where the 3rd army had driven clear through the Siegfried line The 2nd Indian Head division commanded by Maj Gen Walter M Robinson and the 9th division of Maj Gen Louis A Craig car ried the assault to Gemund and Schleiden both towns of about 2500 To the south in Alsace the cut off pocket southwest of Colmar shrank swiftly to less than half its former size Munster 10 miles west of Colmar was taken The Germans still fought hard at En jlshelin anflaronndNenfbrisach 13 miles to the Lt Gen George S Pattons 3rd army gained IVt miles on an 8 mile front 7 miles inside Ger many Despite the counterattack of 250 Germans back into Brand scheid it was said at supreme headquarters that German resis tance at some places appeared to 2200 Yank Planes Strike Nazi Towns London 2200 Amer ican planes staged one of the greatest mass raids on Germany Tuesday attacking Leipzig Magdeburg and Chemnitz the lat ter less than 30 mites from the Czechoslovak border More than 1300 Flying Fort resses and Liberators flew in the 250mile long sky train which broke into 3 sections Leipzig 85 miles south and west of Berlin is a possible haven for nazis fleeing Berlin Industrial Chemnitz is 40 miles farther southeast Magdeburg is 70 miles west and south of Berlin Several other towns In central Germany also apparently were hit A preliminary announcement said the targets were Industries and communications About 850 Mustangs and Thun derbolts flew escort The raid of Chemnitz 35 miles from Dresden represented a roundtrip night of 1300 miles The day raids followed a night mosquito attack on Berlin where delayed action bombs planted in Saturdays huge Flying Fortress raid still were exploding be sagging Imminently threatened Gemund lies 14 miles southwest of Euskir chen and 27 from the large Rhine city of Bonn Schleiden is 3 miles south of Gemund Both are on the narrow Olaf river which has been reached The 1st army was boring to ward the Rhine against what su preme headquarters described as stiffening resistance in the last main row of the jolted Siegfried line Correspondents were told that once the Americans tet through Gemund or Schleiden they will be through the prepared defense zone It was emphasized however that just as in the case of the ori diyisions and the French 1st army widened to 5 miles their cutoff corridor which split the Colrnar pocket between the 111 river and the Vosges foothills where nazi rearguards were hemmed in a death trap The allies were cav ing in the pocket with gains up to 5 miles in a day East of the cutoff the road be tween captured Neufbrisach and the Rhine railroad bridge was cut and German troops were boxed alone the Rhine bankto the south with only pontoon boats for their more Alsatian towns taken With Lt Gen Omar NBradley back in command of the 1st and 3rd U S armies in his 12th army group his troops applied steady pressure to the central sections of the west wall fortifications The 1st army already has won control of 2 of the 5 dams con trolling levels on the Roer a bar rier stream at the edge of the Cologne plain Two and a half miles southwest of the 3 remain ing dams the 2nd Indian Head division engaged in heavy fight ing on the narrow Olef river in the Hellentha area The 9th divi sion captured high ground near Scheuren which overlooks Schleiden at the extreme eastern fringe of the double Siegfried line The Germans pulled back their jolted defense forces into an arc around both Schleiden and Ge mund also at the eastern edge of the Siegfried fortifications for a last attempt to keep the 1st army from ripping through the last pill box chain and bursting into the RUSSIANS OUTFLANK ODER RIVER STRONGHOLDS arrows show how red army troops drives north of Kustrin and southeast of Frankfurt threaten to outflank those Oder river strongpoints guarding the approaches to Berlin Black arrows and heavy line indicate drives and battlefront officially reported by Moscow British Trade Union Leader Says Big Three Now Meeting London Walter Citrine British trade union leader an nounced Tuesday that Prime Minister Churchill was meeting with President Roosevelt and Premier Stalin at this very moment Itwas the first concrete disclosure from allied quarters that they STALIN CLAIMS CROSSINGS ON 50 MILE FRONT Berlin Radio Says Russians on West Bank 30 Miles Away By The Associated Press London red army has smashed across the Oder river on a 50mile front southeast of Bres lau in Silesia Marshal Stalin an nounced Tuesday night and Ger man broadcasts declared the Soviets had flung 3 bridgeheads over the river cast of Berlin with in 30 miles of the nazi capital Stalin still silent whether the Oder has been forced at its closest point to Berlin disclosed the 1st Ukrainian army had rammed beyond the Oder in Silesia seizins 6 towns including the west bank strongholds of Brier 24 miles southeast of Breslau and 4 miles southeast of Breslau Berlin days ago had reported lussian crossings in this area German broadcast disclosing hat the Oder had been crossed in he Frankfurt area 38 miles east of Berlin declared ominously that he river has become the stream deciding the fate of Germany An afternoon broadcast from Xerlln said marshal Gregory Zhu kovs men had established two more bridgeheads south of Frank furt In the frontal assault on Ber lin A crossing 35 miles northeast of Berlin in the area northwest of Kustrin was announced earlier Berlin said one of the latest crossings was at Furstenberg on the Oders west uank 14 miles in session Citrine made thei statement at the opening session RAINBOW JOINS 7T1I ARMY With V S 7th Army famed 42nd Rainbow division under command of Maj Gen Har ry J Collins is now a part of the U S Seventh army It was permitted to be disclosed Tuesday ginal breach at Aachen the troops could expect to run into recently completed earthworks which are extensions of the original line and could be defended stiffly The country ahead is characterized by steep hills deep valleys and winding streams So far however resistance has appeared so spotty as to suggest strongly that the German army had sapped its western strength too much in its alarm to speed troops to the Russian front Below Strasbourg 4 American ft ft Si open toward the Rhine 28 miles away The Americans fought with in 14 miles of Euskircheii a ma jor traffic center German broadcasts repeated alarmed warnings that Gen Eisen hower was massing divisions for au offensive north and east of Aachen where the U S 9th army and British 2nd army are deployed along along the west bank ot the Rocr from Holland to below Duren Allied artillery barrages were reported increasing Schleiden and Gemund both were presumably under artillery gress He did not give any hint as to where the meeting was being held The French Telegraph agency however said the 3 lead ers were conferringat Sochi a Russian Black Sea port 20 miles above the border of Stalins province of Georgia The German radio declared the meeting was being held either on a warship in the Black Sea or at a Black Sea port Arrangement had been made for Mr Churchill to address this congress Citrine said But since that arrangement was entered into a conference was arranged between the great powers nnd it is taking place at this very mo ment Citrine secretary of the con gress read a message of greeting from the prime minister The German press and radio still were giving top priority to the Big 3 parley Apart from his onslaught from the east Berlin newspapers warned the enemy is going to demand capitulation from us This demand behind which stands the whole destructive wil of our enemies should prepare us for the same fate as those of our allies Which became weak The British Press association said no official announcement of the conclusions reached at the BiR 3 conference is to be expected until U has taken place nnd the leaders have returned o their The news agency said simul aneous statements would then be Wateirlcib Man Freed rom Santo Tomas Waterloo news lef us practically speechless its al most too good to be true said Mrs J J Brennan Waterloo when she earned of the safety of her son CaptJohn J Brennan of the army medical corps Capt Brennan a physician who holds the distinguished service cross for heroism in the defense of Bataan peninsula was cap ured when Bataan fell April 9 1942 When Hie other prison camp was taken recently we were dis appointcdt at not hearing from our son because he nad previous ly been interned there Mrs Brennan said But now our pray ers have been answered Throughout his imprisonment his parents had only a cards The last one received 2 weeks ago was dated May 4 1944 Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy battering with the Sth division within sight of both There was no word of opera tions along Field marshal Mont gomerys front from just north of the dank Monschau forest to the northeast Intermittent showers and con tinued thaws handicapped opera tions Belgian and Luxembourg natives said the backbone of win ter perhaps had been broken and that the unusually rigorous Janu ary might presage an early spring Texans and Oklahomans of the 3rd armys 90th division captured Habscheid 4 miles inside Ger many in an advance of more than a mile The town is part of the Siegfried line Other elements of the 90lh obtained high ground southwest of Habscheid in a I mile advance In the Campholz woods 15 miles southeast of Luxembourg City 50 Germans counterattacked late Monday but were repulsed quick ly The 3rd army took 420 prison ers Monday Supreme headquar ters said 6912 had been captured in 4 days ending Feb 4 made in Washington Moscow and London FIRST ARMY NEARS GEMUND SCHLEIDEN U S 1st army troops arrow were reported to have broken completely through the Siegfried line between the Ger man fortresses of Gemund and Schleiden Within sight of the Yanks were the vital dams which control flood levels in the Roer river valley FACES FIRING SQUAD New De Brasil lach former editor of the Pari Je Suis Partout who was con demned to death by a French court Jan 19 for intelligenci with the enemy was execute Tuesday the French Press Agenc said in a dispatch reported by In FCC Sentence Sergeant or Black Market Paris Kenneth L Shields Camp Dodge Iowa was dishonorably discharged from the army ana faced 5 years at hard labor Tuesday for his part in black market dealings with government property Shields was one of 14 enlisted men to plead guilty Mon day before a court martial board to stealing government supplies and selling them at above ceiling prices Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Snow flurries and considerably colder Tuesday night Lowest about 10 below Wednesday clearing and con tinued cold Iowa Snow Hurries and much colder Tuesday night Clearing Wednesday and continued cold Fresh and strong winds dimin ishing late Tuesday night Minnesota Cold wave with tem perature falling to 10 to 15 be low north and zero to 5 below south portion by Wednesday morning Snow flurries Tuesday night followed by clearing and continued cold Wednesday Fresh to strong winds diminish ing Wednesday night southeast of Frankfurt and miles southeast of Berlin Soviet units won athird bridge head about three miles south of F urstenbergi a Transoc ean cast V If crossing had been made between Frankfurt and Kustrin on a line from38 to 40 miles from Berlin but that this bridgehead had been wiped out Eastern front operations as sumed the character of fighting for establishment and smashing of bridgeheads the broadcast said Numerous Russian bridgeheads on the west bank of the Oder al ready have been narrowed down by German counterattacks while the enemy succeeded in wid ening some others Red army siege guns were bat tering the Germans across the smokeshrouded Oder on a 73mile front cast of Berlin and Moscow dispatches indicated important news might soon be announced in that sector A supplement to the German communique said Stcinau a town of 5000 on the Oders west bank 32 miles northwest of Breslau had been abandoned with the nazi garrison fighting its way back to German lines Moscow has kept silent for days on activities of Marshal Ivan Konevs first Ukrainian army in Silesia but Berlin has told of heavy attacks A push from Sleinau would carry anking threats to both Berlin id Bvcslau Tlic Soviets captured Zellin 32 liles from Berlin on the Oder orthwest of Kustrin and seized amvorst a suburb ot Frankturt arther south A tremendous gun uel raged there as soviet artil ery in Damvorst on the east ank laid curtains of shells into rankfurt Marshal Gregory Zukhovs ar illerymen were firing over open IN MASON CITY Maximum Monday 10 Minimum Monday 10 At 8 a m Tuesday 18 Precipitation Trace YEAR AGO Maximum 29 Minimum 1 BLOOD DONOR INFORMATION HEADQUARTERS Y M C A banquet room Mason City Telephone 960 HOURS 1 to 5 p m Monday 10 a m to p m Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday 9 a m to 1 30 p m Friday DONORS SHOULD Keep appointments promptly Eat no fatty food for at least 4 hours before donating Wear clothing with sleeves which can be rolled up Bring donor cards if they have contributed blood before Ob tain the written consent of parent guardian or mate if under 21 KEEP APPOINTMENTS PROMPTLY Ights a Moscow dispatch said nd there was extremely heavy ighting along the approaches to Oder bridges north and south of rankfurt 38 miles from Berlin The night glow of battle was ilainly visible in the reich capi al prisoners told their Russian captors Smoke overhung the Oder like protective screen Moscow re ports said Handtohand battles raged in he suburbs of Kustrin and the Soviets were but 2 miles from the icart of that important rail and fortress city it was announced A Moscow dispatch declared the Germans had lost 20000 killed n the last 4 days in the Frank furlKusirin sector The Germans 25th motorized o nave been rushed from the west ern front and sent across the Oder to delay reported nearly wiped out Monday Moscow officials kept silent on whether Zhukov had spanned the Oder but a dispatch from that capital said There is good reason to believe that important news may be forthcoming from this sec tor Germans were fighting furious ly to hold open a highway bridge over the Oder near Schwctig just south of Frankfurt Soviet guns shelled the road running along the rivers west bank between Frank   

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