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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 28, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTOBV ANO ARCHIVC YOU U AaocUUd PnM an4 United Proa riiU Leucd Wiro THE NEWSFAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Ccnu a HOME EDITION mrm MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY DECEMBER 28 1944 Paptr Consiiti of Two SicUomSccUon On NQ ft YANKS CUT IN ON SIDES OF BULGE Ward Properties in 7 Cities Seized by U S ARMY ACTS AS ORDER IS SENT BY ROOSEVELT Avery Greets General Byron Pleasantly in Office 2 Shake Hands Trie army took of Montgomery and company properties in 7 cities Thursday under an executive or der President Roosevelt who declared the government cannot and i will not tolerate any inter ference with war production in this critical hour Ttie seizure came amid strikes at Ward establishments in De troit Chicago and Kansas City as protests by the CIO United Retail Wholesale and Department Store Employes union against allure of the company and its board chair man Sewell Avery to comply with war labor board directives President Roosevelt said in a statement that Montgomery Ward willnot be allowed to set aside government wartime policies just because Mr Sewell Avery does not approve of the governments procedure lor handling labor dis putes In his orders to Secretary Stim apn Mr Hoosevelt also directed war department to make re troactive pay increase payments Ward employes in the 7 cities as ordered by bdard The mail order company long in dispute with WLBhad agreed to the wage hikes tut disputed the dates they should be effective Some go back a yearormore Maj Genijoseph W Byron di rector of the armys special serv ices division served the seizure order on Avery In the chairmans private office Avery greeted the genera pleasantly and shook hands Almost at thesame hour a staff of justice department experts from Washington filed a petition in federal court asking for an in junction to restrain Avery and other company officials from in terfering with government oper ation of the mail order concerns facilities in Chicago Detroit St Paul Denver Jamaica N Y Portland Ore and San Rafael Cal The petition also asked for a declaratory judgment authorizin government seizure Stuart Ball counsel for the company told U s Attorney J Albert Wollhe would accept im mediate service of the complaint andbe asked for an immediate hearihg The case was assigned to Federal Judge Philip li Sullivan The 32page complaint named Avery and 15 other company of ficials as defendants It contended that persistent refusal of Wards to accept WLB determinations or to settle labor disputes peacefully had led other parties to refuse to accept WLB decisionsand threat ens the maintenance of the no strike nolockout pledge and threatens to break down the pro cedure for peaceful adjustmentof labor disputes It said the government believed Wards intended to interfere with lawful possession of the properties and therefore it was necessary for the court to declare the governments rights and status and to interpret the war labor disputes act and the constitutional and statutory war powers of the president Such a judgment the government contended would terminate the controversy and re move all uncertainty Hugh B Cox assistant to the solicitor general and head of the Washington legal staff here for the case told reporters later the suit sought to determine once and for all exactly how far the ex ecutive branch of the government can go instraightening out labor iridustry disputes Montgomery Ward and company has 20 days in which to answer thecomplaint Judge Sullivan did not indicate whether or when there would be an immediate hearing The seizure came as the CIO united retail wholesale and retail employes of America began the 2nd strike at Wards Chicago plants this year It was the 2nd army seizure too the first coming last April 26 when an aide to the department of commerce took over On April 27 Avery was carried bodily from his office by 2 soldiers after the government contended SEWELL AVEKY board chairman he refused to cooperate in the seizure procedure Qeneral Byron issued the fol lowing statement in seizing the mail order concerns properties In accordance with the provi sions of an executive order the war department has taken posses sion of certain properties of Mont gomery Ward and Company Inc in Chicago Detroit St Paul Den ver Jamaica L I INT Y Portland Ore and Santa Rafael Cal These properties will be op erated under the terms of the di rective orders of the national war labor board as specified in the executive order It is the sincere hope of the war department that it will have the cooperation ot every execu tive and employe of Mofit andCompany inc in the fulfillment of itsmission arid thatit will be possible near future for the war depart ment to relinquish control this enterprise so that those of us who have been assigned to this task may return to our urgent wai duties In the 7 cities concerned long standing labor disputes have ex isted between the union and Wards The union contended thai in each locality the company re fused to follow WLB directives The WLB sent the cases to Fred M Vinson economic stabilization director a week ago and he evi dently advised President Roosevelt to seize the properties Maintenance of union member ship was a fundamental issue in the cases Avery having refused to grant it on the contention it woulc deprive employes their right free I to join or not to join a union and still work for the big mail order concern Justice department specialists from Washington worked until 5 a min the U S district attor neys office preparing it was un derstood for federal court action in the event Montgomery Ware resisted the seizure This action would be a petition for aninjunc tion to restrain Avery and pthe company officials from inlerferint with government operation of the GREEKS AGREE ON REGENCY AS STEP TO PEACE Churchill F R and Stalin to Take Up Question in Near Future BULLETIN London iP Prime Minister Churchill and Foreign Secretary Eden have left Athens for London lo urge King George II of Greece to approve creation of a Grecian regency BBCs correspondent in Athens reported Thursday Athens Greek po litical factions were agreed Thurs day to formation of a regency in a step towards peace as British military authorities reported a withdrawal of some ELAS forces from Athens topositions on high ways leading into the city A majority of the conferees ex pressed themselves in favor of an immediate regency while a min ority favored postponement it was announced by Archbishop Damaskinos the chairman An allied force headquarters communique said insurgent troops which entered the city appeared to be evacuating and leaving the fighting in the built up JEAS to the original WHENS ELAS corps concentrated at Piraeus and inthe northernand southern districts K V The eofemuriiquesaid the pro cess of clearing Athens of the ELAS wasprogressing slowly but satisfactorily The regency issue w a s voted upon Wednesday at an allparty conference after which Cburchil 10 FILE RESERVATIONS New York American lieutenants now prisoners in Ger many have atleast one postwar plan made ANew York hotel re ports they havefiled a standing cfrder for reservations for use a soon as they reach the Unite States Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Moderate tempera tures Thursday afternoon and Thursday night lowest about 10 above increasing cloudiness with light snow late night and Friday Iowa Becoming cloudy Thursda night Light snow in the ex treme west portion Thursda night and in the entire stati Friday Slowly rising tempera tures Shippers forecast North west 1ft southwest 15 north east 5 southeast 10 Same in cities Minnesota Mostly cloudy with slowly rising temperatures Thursday night and Friday Light snow extreme west por tion Thursday night and most o state Friday Increasing winds becoming fresh Friday IN MASON CITY GlobeGEzette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 20 above Minimum Wednesday night jj below At 8 a m Thursday 11 below At p m Thurs 9 above YEAH AGO Maximum 19 Minimum minus 1 Machine Gunners Miss Churchill by 30 Yards in Athens Athens source said Thursday that machinegun bullets believed fired in an as sassination attempt missed Prime Minister Churchill and other Brit ish authorities by 30 yards Wed nesday but wounded a Greek gir probably fatally It was the second time In 24 hours that Churchill has missed death in Athens On Tuesday nearly aton of dynamite was found fused in a beneath the Great Britain hotel British and Greek headquarters British informants charged that m a c h i n egunners undoubtedly were aiming at Churchill Marsha Sir Harold K L G Alexander supreme allied commander for the Mediterranean theater and Lt Gen Eonali Scobie British com mander in Attiens when they opened fire Wednesday They conceded however that tht snipers might not have known that Churchill was in the party which was entering an armored car in front of the British em bassy short burst felled a Greek eirl 100 yards away and struck an adjacent buildine 30 yards from ChurchilL announced that he President Roosevelt and Premier Stalin would take up the Greek ques tion at a meeting in the near fu ture Of course we must expect that in a not very long time President Roosevelt Marshal Stalin and my self will meet again and we will certainly review the situation Churchill told a press canttrdice Asked what was likely to bap pen if no settlement were reached at the allparty conference Churchill replied If no agreement is reached the guns will go on firing the troops will clear the district and we shall establish peace order and security in Attica During the session which was held in a tense atmosphere as fighting flared up throughout the city Greek Premier George Pa pandreou was said to have of fered to resign as a means of ex pediting the regency presumably under Archibishop Damaskinos of Greece Churchill told newsmen that when the leaders of the 3 great powers eet together soon the Greek question will be of the most important items on the agenda We feel our course has been absolutely right he said In Au gust in consultation with Presi dent Roosevelt we agreed to briri in food and relief and help until things settled down Premier Sta WVI vrciiiiaiiuciKuiu uuruer in Tne pnotoatane ton while nazj troops areshown The nazi troop picture isfrora a rolLpf captured States army signal corps radiopnotos lin was consulted and gave his consent to this course Churchill denied that Britain is endeavoring to bring back King George II and impose a particu lar rule on Greece It is clear to me there would have been a massacre if we had not intervened he said adding a further denial of allegations that Britain had territorial claims or desired bases in Greece He said the British would not now withdraw until the revolting forces had been driven out of At tica or withdrawn from the built up area around the capital Hickenlooper to Quit State Post for Senate Oath Jan 3 Des Moines B B Hickenlooper will resign Friday The Associated Press learned authoritatively Thursday that he will hand m his resignation to take effect immediately and enable mm to be sworn into the MERCURY DROPS TO 11 BELOW Little Prospect for Break in Gold Wave Des Mo minimum temperatures Thursday morning were somewhat higher than they have been lately there was little prospect in the weather bureaus forecast for a break in the current cold wave in Iowa The prediction was for fair and continued rather cold weather Thursday increasing cldudiness and warmer Thursday night with light snow in the west and light snow with little change in tem perature Friday The lowest reading reported in the state Thursday morning was 11 degrees below zero at Fort Dodge and Mason City Other be low zero minima includesAmes 7 Charles City G Atlantic 5 ana Spencer and Sipux City 3 Highest temperature in the state Wednesday was28 degrees at Sioux City Council Bluffs and Ot turmva The weather bureau recorded scattered light snowfalP Wednes day night In terms of amount rf precipitation the reports showed Ottumwa 18 of an inch Cedar Rapids 04 Davenport and Burlington and Iowa City 02 Captures 34 Nazis Without Magazine in His Carbine With U S 7th Army James Tower a 6 foot 2 190 pounder from Grand Island N Y hurled several grenades into a machine gun nest Before he coulduse his carbine 34 Germans singlefiled from a hidden culvert and surrendered Tower marched the Germans down the road Dont look now said another officer who joined him but you havent any magazine in your car I bine1 States senate Jan 3 when the 79th congress convenes plane from Mindoro have poc congress convenes He was elected to the senate in the November election to succeed GuyM Gillette uy ivi kaiueue macAnnur de Hickenlooper will be succeeded scribed the naval attack as fruit immediately by XtGov Robert leis and inaccurate shelline As D Blue another republican who sociated Press War Corresponden was elected governor last month Davis termed it anothc Hickenloopcrs term ordinarily tne one list of failures th xvould run until Jan 11 but by Japanese navy has suffered in the leaving office in advance of the Philippines he apparen effect of the shelling was to star congressional session he will be able to take his seat in the senate along with most of the other new ly elected senators and thus ob tain seniority for committee ap pointments The state executive council met in closed session unusual procedure for that and it was learned that the meet ing concerned Hickenloopers plans to resign The governor at tended the meeting Planes Chase Surviving Jap Warships By LEONARD MILLIMAN Associated Press War Editor American bombers relentlessly pursued surviving Japanese war ships froma once powerful task force that shelled U S airdromes in trie Philippines while a Pacific fleet force steamed away almost from a similar bomb ardment of an enemy air base island 750 miles south of Tokyo The Nipponese attack on Min doro island cost the Japanese 3 destroyers sunk and I battleship and a heaTy cruiser damaged Only 3 destroyers in the force of warships escaped unharmed from a persistent counterattack by PTboatsand everr plane avail able on Mtndoro Two American warships were hit by shore batteries when they joined Saipanbased bombers in pounding Iwo Jima for the third time this month Iwo was shelled to protect Sai pan from which some 50 Super forts Wednesday attacked Tokyo and left flames raging into the big Musashim aircraft plant The Japanese attack on Mjn doro was the first powerful at tempt to choke off increasing U S fighter and bomber attacks on air fields around Manila a halt marked runways and destroyed 124 Japanese aircraft Gen Douglas MacArthur a few grass fires A Japanese communique jIU the warships lighted a veritable sea of fire around U S air field and a munitions dump Japanese interception met thi B29s over Tokyo resulting in per haps thegreatest bag of Jnpancsi fighter pilots ever scored ove Honshu island One Superfort wa lost to the persistent Nipponese attacks One B29 was attacked Si times Toyfco tried to hide under i smokescreen pouring out smudg pots Itwas a futile attempt Aside from the first formation overshooting the aircraft factor under the impetus of a strong tail wind returning airmen reporte they hit the target squarely As the B29s were overhea Adm Mitsumasa Yonai Nippon ese naval minister called for in creased air production to replac losses in the war of attrition i air strength Speeding the attrition Van fighters shot down 13 of 20 inter ceptors put up in the weakenin defense of Clark field near Ma nila Other bombers ranging ove the Philippines and Borneo san 7 small Japanese cargo ships 1000 tons or less Blast German I itails Despite Bad Weather London hun red heavy bombers hammered 11 ail targets in western Germany hursday despite bad weather curtailed close air support or American ground forces Five hundred British bombers Iruck just before dawn aiming heir bomb loadof about 2500 ons on ground flares planted by planes at Opladen 12 liles north of Cologne The U S 8th air forces 1200 eavies also based in Britain ombed the other targets by in truments through dense clouds phey were escorted by 700 U S ighters which encountered no op osition from German planes The British escort likewise had no pposition in the air The 4000ton bomb load of the American armada fell on 10 rail yards and bridges and on junction Joints between the German sali nt in Belgium and the Rhine The BAF hit the railway work hop at Opladen where the Ger iians have been trying to repair lamaged military rolling stock BE HANGED FRIDAY Announces He Will Not Have Final Statement Fort Madison minute jreparations were being made Thursday for the scheduled exec ution Friday of Stanley Kaster 36 convicted of the murder of a Waverly Iowa utilities guard taster is to be hanged at sunrise a m A special guard wasto be placed over him Thursday night A midnight meal will be served him if he wishes it He will1be given breakfastat 7 a m Friday Kaster sentenced to die for the shotgun slaying of Glenn Win chell 38f has told P A Lainson varden of the state penitentiary that he would not make a state ment prior to his execution BOMBS KILLED 8098 BRITISH 21137 Other Civilians Injured This Year London O German bombs and Vbombs killed 8098 British civilians and seriously injurec 21137 in the first 11 months o this year the government an nounced Thursday night This brought the total deac since Jan 1 1940 to 54205 Deaths in previous years were 1940 19779 1941 20844 1942 3122 1943 2362 Seriously injured were 1940 25665 1941 21788 1942 3953 1943 3409 Sends LeftHanded Greetings to OPA Portland Ore a irate Oregon woman to the slat OPA ration board came this lefl handed holiday greetings on ap propriate Christmas stationery Thirtyfour blue stamps 34 re stamps 15 pounds of sugar i validated Merry Christmas and Happy New Year Buy your War Bonds an hours flight away In 3 days of Stamps from your GIobeGazctt successive attacks on Clark field carrier boy CLARE MARSHALL BURIED Cedar Rapids than iOO persons attended funeral serv ces Wednesday for Clare R Mar shall 51 treasurer and editoria director of the Cedar Rapids Ga zette whose life record was de scribed by Dr Harry Morehouse Gage president of Lindenwooc college St Charles Mo as ful and rich ONLY 20 MILES FROM SNAPPING TRAP ON NAZIS Whole Southern Flank of von Rundstedt Yields Slowly to Hammering Paris forces cut ing into BOTH SIDESof the von Rundstedt bulge at its thinnest neck have fought to within less han 20 miles at a junction 36 hour old reports from the front aid Thursday night The whole southern flank of the nemy salient from Bastogne to he German border yielded slowly o hammering Doughboys and anks crossed the Sure river at 4 Places and threw the enemy back nto the rcich at 2 places in the Echternach area at the eastern md of the wedge The razorthin relief corridor to epic Bastogne held firm against infantry and armored at tack The Germans were buffeted sack further in hard fighting near rcandmenil and Marche points 20 miles away on the other side of he bulge Part of the German spearhead hich had driven deepest into Belgium at Celles was ENCIR CLED and hammered into disin tegration by a ring of guns and armor and another pocket along the underbelly of the salient was receiving similar treatment The probing armor that had pushed close to Ciney 15 miles from Namur in the northwestern tip of the bulge had been beaten back until the battleline ran 7 to 8 miles southeast of the village The main fighting in the Celles area was now in the vicinity of Verre 2 miles to the southeast Along the southern flankthe Americans continuedto gain and were acrosS7 the whole line of the Sure river from the Bastogne area to the German frontier Where they were not across stream they held the high ground on the south side Gains oti the north side of the salient included capture of Grand menil and Manhay and the partial recapture of Humain where street fighting was in progress It was too early to foresee the outcome for the Americans in their counterattack now under way faced formidable obstacles But there were clear indications the bold nazi bid for a great De cember victory had butted into serious trouble The German army had been held for more than 48 hours up to Wednesday dawn without a sig nificant gain German pockets were sur rounded in the western head of the enemy offensive and on the southern flank and were under tempests of shellfire Southwest of Echternach the G e im a n s were retreating and northwest of that southern hinge of the salient they were preparing an escape bridge under American fire and were preparing to pull back into Germany across the Sure A bit farther northwest 250 Germans were seen swimming the Our river back into Germany Three of the American crossings of the Sure which Berlin broad casts said were by the U S 3rd army under the command of Lt Gen George S Patton were near Bonnal ZA miles northwest of Eschdorf The fourth was at a TIDE above map shows the greatest ad vance made by the German offensive It was disclosed lliursday that Americans are cutting in on the German lovce from the south at Bastogne while from thenorth they were slashing from the Marche area   

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