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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 5, 1944 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - December 5, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME U Asaoetaled Ptesi and United Press Full Leased Wires Five Ccnu Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY DECEMBEK 5 1944 HOME EDITION mmr It Must NOT Happen Here BERLIN IS HIT BY LARGE YANK PLANE FLEET Fighter Escort Downs 80 Nazi Craft 2000 Tons of Bombs Dropped London heavy bombers blasted Berlin with aj most 2000 tons ot bombs Tuesday Their fighter escort shot down 80 German planes over the nazi cap ital was the first daylight raid by heavy bombers oa Berlin in Z months The bulk of the fleet of more than 550 heavies and 800 fighters from bases in Britain smashed munitions and tank factories in side Berlin arid in Tegel a sub urb Others hit the rail center of Munster The luftwaffe made one of its rare appearances in strength but the nazi fighters apparently failed to reach the big bomber forma This reproductionof F S Mannings famous Empty Stocking painting is by way of announcing that the annual Christmas Cheer Fund sdicitation for which ove7a pe riod of almost 20 years the GlobeGazette has served as a clearing house will get formally under way Thursday of this week Appropriately enough this will be the 3rd anniverV or feari liaruor day A et ed years plansincluding the goal of the drive will i presentation by Miss Loretta Walsh assistant Social Wednesday nightSuPpose you have your dial The Order of Christmas Good Fellows in this community have the enviable rec ord of never having fallen down on this annual assignment Theres every good reason to believe that they will not be found wanting this year Je in Thursdays paper should be either brought to the GlobeGazette office or mailed to us with this address Christmas Cheer GlobeGazette Mason City Iowa The emphasis year as in the past will be on the childien of our com munity There must be no reenactment of this Empty Stocking scene in Mason City Tokyo Plane Demolished by B29s V BAD WEATHER IS HANDICAP Inland Philippine Sea Battle Ends in Draw By LEOXARD Associated Press War Editor American commanders report ed soberly Tuesday that the first sea battle fought in inland Phil ippine waters ended in a virtual draw and Superforts have not been able to knock out the air craft factory which has been their main target in 4 raids on Tokyo A Japanese and an American destroyer were sunk in a night time engagement fought in Nip ponesemined waters oft Ormoc on western Leyte between a small U S squadron and 3 en emy ships The U S ship was torn apart by an aerial torpedo or a mine She sank in less than a minute her guns still firing Most of her crew was saved largely by the daring rescue of Catalina flying boats which dragged the sailors from the water in full view of the heavilygarrisoned coast A 2nd enemy destroyer was believed to have been hit in the engagement Elsewhere in the Philippines and Borneo waters 5 small Japanese transports freighters and tankers were sunk and 3 damaged More than 14 Nipponese planes were wiped out nearly half of them during the battle in Ormbc harbor The B29s the big guns of American aviation have been handicapped by persistently bad weather in their Tokyo raids said Brig Gen Hay wood Han sell commander of the 21st bomber command Substantial damage has been inflicted upon the Musashima aircraft plant but it has not been destroyed by a damned sight he declared ence Tokyo radio boasted in a press confer The nui sance value of the raids has been offset by the heightened morale of the Japanese people Liberators continued their daily bombings of the Bonin and Volcano islands in an attempt to knock out all Japanese airfields on the Superfortress route from Saipan to Tokyo Five airfields were raided in the Philippines whereground fighting remained at a virtual standstill on te island The 32nd division raindrenched Ley pressed on Nazi Scorched Earth Policy Will Make Germans Suffer By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS General Eisenhower bluntly informed the German people Tu day that they cannot count upon food fuel or clothing from i military government and tary government and rely upon their own resources les the The scorched earth policy of the retreating nazi army will serve only to multiply the suf fering and hardships of the Ger man people he said in a procla mation read over allied trans mitters in Europe and reported by the office of war information The allied armed forces will import the bulk of their require ments the proclamation said If they should be in a position to give help to the population of Europe this help will primarily go to the population of the coun tries which have been ravaged and plundered by the German armies The German people will have to rely on its own resources It is of highest importance that with the slow mudhampered task ot clearing the Ormoc cor ridor below Limon capturing an entire artillery battery and 21 machineguns intact Several strong points were mopped up by artillery supported infantrymen m the mountains near Dagami east of Ormoc Crack Chinese troops marched ont of the northwest to meet Japa nese columns driving into Kwei chow province of central China where they threaten to break the nations reviving Banna road life line The enemy was only 60 miles from Kweiyang Burma road city and provincial capital of Kwei chow The Chinese reinforcements may be from the long immobilized forces which have been blockad ing the communistcontrolled sec tion of China Withdrawal of these troops would be a logical sequel to a se ries of recent developments in Chungking l Generalissimo Chiang KaiSheks approval of an American plan for disposition of his armies 2 appointment Mon day of liberal T V Soong as Chiangs righthand man in the na tionalist government 3 presence of Gen Chou EnLai communist leader in Chungking to negotiate a raprochement between the com munist and Kuomintang sections of China Minor Chinese gains were re ported m front line dispatches from Hunan province east of Kweichow where Chiangs forces were reported harassing long en emy supply lines and clashing with the invaders mopup squads these resources should not be de stroyed by the nazis scorched earth policy Food supplies seeds fertilizers and agricultural machines rriust be salvaged above all Eisen hower said if hunger is not to follow the defeat German farm ers must by all possible means prevent the nazis from driving away their cattle as the allied ar mies advance They must do everything in their power to keep their farms in order and to achieve peak production Eisenhower warned the people of the reich that the hopes of the German people to avoic economic collapse after the defea are largely dependent upon the extent of German opposition to nazi plans to destroy German property and German natural re sources before the occupation bj allied troops The German army will be de feated the proclamation said Larger and larger portions German territory will be oci pied by the allied armies until the national socialist government and the German armed forces finally surrender or until they are crushed The military government wil not give any compensation for public utilities buildings supplies mines or industrial installations which have been destroyed by the Germans in carrying out their scorched earth policy As long as the German army obeys the nazis orders to pro long a futile resistance the allied air and ground forces are bounc to inflict heavy material damages upon Germany The sufferings and hardships thus created wil multiply themselves if the Ger man people itself carries out the nazi plans to transform Germany into a desert Planes AA Attack Nazi Flying Bombs London fighters anu antiaircraft guns went into ac tion along the British east coas Monday night when German fly ing bombs were directed agains southernEngland There was dam age but no casualties were re ported in the period from dawn Monday to 7 a m Tuesday tions Clinging together in packs of 100 or more the nazi Messer schmitts and FockeWulfs con centrated on small groups of the bombers but the American fight ers wouldnt let them in Maj William J Hove of Crook stoa Minn led squadron against his 50 Mustang German fighters diving toward a fortress formation Eleven enemy planes were destroyed in a Hash a spokesman for the U S strategic airforces said Hove was credited with 5 kills and shared another with his wing man it Alexander of Hollywood i The last American raid on the nazi capital was Oct 6 Tuesday the fighters had the added advan tage of friendly bases in Belgium and France close to the reich frontier and they could fight with gasoline they once had to save for the 500 mile journey back to Bri There was some cloud over Ber lin but the first big formation at bombers was able to bomb vis ually through gaping holes over the target area The German fighters apaiently gave up after the furious battle with the firsi planes vto reach Berlin mations reported Qieyv wire lib molested W WATERLOO SNOW IS 3 INCHES Report Highways Are Slippery Dangerous Des Moines heavy blan ket of fresh snow ranging up to 3 inches at Waterloo covered Iowa Tuesdayinterrupting communica tion facilities and making high ways slippery and dangerous There were no communication facilities into Creston in the southwest corner of the state for several hours Fifty poles carry ing telephone and telegraph lines were brokenin the Creston area the wire companies reported The amount of snow was not learned The snow was exceptionally wet andslushy clinging to wires poles and trees as it came down and sticking to the pavement It added fresh slickness to streets and side walks that had been coated by ice over the weekend The weather was low est in the state early Tuesday was 27 degrees at much of the snow melted as it fell Ames reported 24 inches of fresh snow making 34 inches on the ground Ottumwa Moines and Cedar Rapids had 2 inches oJ new snow and Charles City and Mason City an inch The weather bureau forecast continued cloudy weather with additional snow in some sections and little change in temperature The high reading in the state Mon day was 43 at Burlington Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST Iowa Fair Tuesday night and Wednesday Cooler Wednesday night Mild temperatures Wed nesday afternoon Shippers forecast Northern half 10 above southwest 35 southeast 18 Mason City Partly cloudy Tues day night and Wednesday cold er Tuesday night with lowest temperature in Mason City 12 Minnesota Fair colder except ex treme northwest portion Tues day night Wednesday partly cloudy and warmer IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette statistics Maximum MonbV 34 Minimum Mo y night 30 At 8 a m luesday 32 Snow if inch Precip inch YEAR AGO Maximum 49 Minimum 28 This Paper ol Twu One NO Churchill To Fight Effort for Greek Red Dictatorship Bridgehead on East Bank of Saar River Widened by Patton Paris IP The 3rd army virtually completed the capture of Saarlautern Tuesday and pushed a mile through the satellite towns of Roden and Fraulaulern to north in the thick outer crust of the shellheaving Siegfried line American 8inch artillery bom barded Saarbrucken from barely 6 miles away the nearby French railcity of Forbach and the bor der town of Sarreguemines while 5 divisions of Lt Gen George S Pattons army beat violently for ward through the last bit of Lor raine toward the Saar production center of German guns and steel Pattons bridgehead on the east bank of the loopingSaar was wid ened to at least a mile and a half His forces were on the river all the way to Menig 16 miles above Saarlautern and executing a clas sical wheeling movement of his right and center as far southeast as Sarre Union One mixed cavalry and infantry team advanced 4 miles inside Ger many south of Saarlautern His men at Roden and Fraulau tern were five and a half miles in side of the Saar nearly a fifth of the way across but they still had to negotiate the Siegfried line Men of the third moved within 2 miles of Forbach a castled town of 11500 and within four and a half miles of Sarreguemines a town of 14000 Along the curling 50mile front from Merzig to Sarre Union upwards of 90000 eager Americans of the third army were on the move Five infantry and two tank divisions were identified in action They encountered strong German opposition across the river in Saarlautern from a few pockets from guns of the Siegfried Patton merely detached a ievf JorcesJkTjnDpup the njpts of nazis in tle city of 320001 com pletely cleared west of the river German guns up to ISO milli meters vflred at least a thousand rounds in 4 hours at the sturdy masonry bridge which Americans captured intact at Saarlautern but by late Mondayit still stood and men and tanks and guns poured across Along the Roer river front to the north within 22 miles of Co logne the violent and prolonged battle of attrition went into a deadlock Gen Eisenhowers com munique said the U S 9th and 1st armies are meeting stubborn resistance in the outskirts of Julich East of the Jnde we have con solidated our positions in Lucher berg and Luchem it said In the Brandenberg area southeast of Hurtgen slight progress has been made The British cleared out ail Ger mans west of the Maas and held the west and south banks of the river all the way from Venlo to the sea Steady methodical progress was made by the U S seventh and French first armies in clearing the snowy Vosges mountains and the sodden Alsace plains The 7th also fought vigorously for the major supply and rail cen Taguenau in an attempt to clear the Germans from the Karls ruhe corner of Lorraine Pattons 95th infantry shoved fresh strength across the Saarlau tern bridge and moved through and around the large east bank towns of Roden and Fraulautern despite sporadic fire from heavy and small arms and mortars Many of the explosives came from the Siegfried line The 5th division working with a task force of the 6th cavalry sliced 4 miles across the Ger man border along a 5mile front overrunning Eberherren 6 miles southwest of Saarlautern and reaching a point miles from Volklingen on the Saar G miles southeast of that 2nd city of the Saar Resistance stiffened on the ap proaches to Saarbrucken 135 000 and Sarreguemines The 6th armored division edged ahead one to 2 miles and reached Tenteling and Metzing 8 and 9 miles south of Saarbrucken capital of the Saarland and a Siegfried line pi vot Beyond captured Puttelange the 35th infantry captures Gueben house and Ernestviller about 5 miles southwest of Sarreguemines Moves of the 3rd and 7th arm ies carried the offensive to or be yond the German frontier almost everywhere from Holland to Switzerland Only small chunks of French Lorraine and Alsace still were in enemy hands The nazis held a 60 mile strip of Lorraine 5 to25 miles deep between Saar and Karlsruhe and a bulge in ihe rugged Vosges of Al sace long anrroptto 30 wide Besides rolling tip German for ward positions Patton con solidating for counterattacks in force which seemed likely at any moment from the hard pressed Siegfried system beyond Saar lauter The 7th army is fighting on the right flank of the 3rd These men of Lt Gen Alexander M Patch captured Diemeringen 4 miles east of Sarre Union and Volkes berg in the forest a few miles far ther east Oberbroon was taken in a flanking penetration II miles northwest of Hageunau last city of size in German hands in Lorraine Oberbroon is 7 miles from the Palatinate border The Germans were disengaging un der what seemed only a local rearguard shield 12000 SEEK VISAS London if The American embassy reported Tuesday that between 12000 and 15000 British wives of U S servicemen have applied for visas to enter the United States Attaches said an other thousand already have been granted visas Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Premier of Greece Offers to Quit Post Athens Premier George Papandreou said Tuesday he had Dffered his resignation as head of he crisistorn Greek government and had suggested formation of a coalition cabinet including cen ter and right wing groups Such a cabinet might be led by Themistokles Sophoulis 82 year old liberal leader he said A general strike persisted in Athens but disorders were re ported diminishing Bias militia of the leftist EAM National Liberation a number of police headquarters they had seized Since the ELAS technically are undeicommand of British Gen R M Scobie as part of the armed forcesof Greece they now are charged with direct mutiny in the British view seizure of po lice precinct headquarters com prised a direct assault against the legal government British troops will use force it necessaiy to maintnin the legal government it was declared The strikes have hindered seri ously he inflow of relief supplies British officials said investiga tions thus far failed to support charges by rightwing Greeks that the current disorders were engineered by axis agents in EAM ranks ELAS troops w e r e reported Monday night to have taken con trol of 20 to 25 police precincts m the Athens area Papandreous government demanded that ELAS members leave the Athens ai by midnight Wednesday One more person was filled and 3 injured Monday evening in a new outbreak of shooting near the Athens railway station when po lice tried to disperse sympathizers returning from the mass funera of 21 persons killed in Sundays disorders precipitated by the governments decree that the ELAS disarm and disband Earlier in the day members armed with 400 ELAS rifles and machine guns attacked the Greek naval college at Piraeus port ol Athens and were dispersed by British tanks only after they had forced their way into the hospital In a brisk 4 hour skirmish 3 Britishers were wounded and the interpreter of a British senior of ficer was slain as he sat in a staff car beside his superior The naval college had been used as headquarters by British and Greek naval forces and Greek navy men defended the place bending the arrival of British ar mor British crews meanwhile manned the Piraeus dockyard and with British troops continued the unloading of relief supplies which had been discontinued Monday as a result of the general strike called by the EAM to protest the disarming order The head of the soviet mission here was fired upon Monday by Greek civil police while driving in his official car bearing a reci flag Police said they mistook the red flag for the EAM insigr nia BRITAIN READY TO USE ARMIES TO KEEP PEACE Prime Minister Stands Firm for Maintaining Present Government London will resist my attempt to impose by vio ence a communist dictatorship in strifetorn Greece and is ready to use her army if necessary to main ain order Prime Minister Church 11 declared Tuesday In a bristling session of the house of commons with 1 com munist and several labor members irlng questions Churchill stood irm behind the government ot 3eorge Papandreou even as Ath ens heard rumors that the premier would resign Fratricidal fighting broke out in the Greek capital over the week end in the crisis which developed when the EAM national libera tion front refused to disband its militia the ELAS ELAS troops were reported in control of 20 ol Athens 25 police precincts Tues day Churchill deplored the fighting and declared we and our Ameri can allies are doing our utmost to give assistance and our troops are acting to prevent bloodshed We shall not hesitate to use the considerable British army now in Greece and being reinforced to see that law and order are maintained Churchill declared He said he was not prepared on information so far available to say who started the firing The question of whether the Greekpeople form themselves into a monarchy or republic must be left for themto decide later he told commons but In the mean time the authority of the consti tutional Greek government must be accented and enforced through out the country The armed force must be de pendent on the Greek govern ment the prime minister said No government can have a sure foundation so long as there are Nazis Claim Aims of Russian Shown By The Associated Press The German news agency DNB said Tuesday that events in Greece are symptomatic of manner in which Moscow is push ing forward its aims at world revolution without regard to Ihe interests of its allies The broad cast quoted a Wilhelmstrasse spokesman as saying the same ob servation could be made concern ing Romania Bulgaria Italy and Belgium and soon perhaps also in Paris GERMAN TOWN DESTROYED BY ARTILLERY FIREfimashed buildiiws and huze era ten mark the result of complete saturation by American artilleiy off ffiiraTarnfy on the town of Dunvss Germany Associated Press Kayenay engraving private armies owing allegiance to a group party or ideology instead of the state and nation Although these facts should be clear to all the left wing and communistministers have resigned from the Greek government at this dangerous crisis rather than im plement measures to which they had already ngreed for the re placement of the EA3I police and guerrillas by regular national services The British government lie said wants to help the Greek people and assist thern in every way possible but we cannot do this if the tom myguns which were provided for use against the Germans are now used in an attempt to impose by violence a COMMUNIST dictator ship without the people being able to express their wishes The only communist member in the house William Gallacher shouted connection with a statement that the Greek communist ministers resigned Churchill shot back I say they have resigned I am stating the facts I thought the house would like a full answer In addition he asserted the left wing EAM leaders called a gen eral strike which was for the time being preventing food sent from Britain and the United States from reaching themouths of the population we are trying to feed Later the prime minister said it would be easy for the British to allow this government crisis to degenerate as it would into an archy or a communist dictator ship He emphasized however that having gone so far Britain should not turn back or take our hand from the plow Churchill assured the house that the British would take care to see that the Greek government it is supporting wae not used to fasten any rule of a faction upon the Greek people and that they would hare the fullest opportun ity of a free election The government of Premier George Papandreou 3 days ago   

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