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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 30, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 30, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND KOINES I COMP THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NOKTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL U Associated Press and United Press Full Leaded Wirea Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY NOVEMBER 36 1941 raptr consists at Two SecllonsSeelion On NO 4S CRACK ROER LINE BEFORE COLOGNE U S to Halt Lend Lease Iron Shipments to British Jan 1 DRASTIC CUT IN WARAIDPLANIN 1945 INDICATED Principle of Equitable Reconversion Worked Out at Conferences Washington IIP The United States plans to halt lendlease shipments or iron and steel to Britain Jan 1 This means a drastic downward revision of thewar aid program for 1945 It was announced officially Thursday in a statement summing up lengthy BritishAmerican lease conferences just concluded liere They resulted in a 000000 proKram for shipments to Britain during cut of al most 50 per cent under compar able figures for this year Elimination ol costfree ship ments of steel and some other and semifabricated mater ials to Britain is made possible by decreasing war demands on Britains own steel industryHwa learned It has been ordered into effect Jan 1 in order to smooth the for reconversion of British in dustry to civilian production on an equitable basis with reconver sion in this country The British are anxious to reconvert in order to begin restoring their 71per ceni lojs in exports The principle ot conversion was worked but fo the first time in these conferences headed Keynes British economist and Harry White American treasury expert It is tat en to mean that the British may relax their war pro duction controls and shift their production capacity where they can on a basis of equality with the United States and that lend lease arrangements from now the rears end will not deny them that opportunity Acting Secretary of State Slet tinius Treasury Secretary Mor ganthau and Leo T Crowley for eign economic administrator joint ly announced tile new schedule Their statement distinguished between lendlease and postwa foreign trade relations of th United States and Britain which are still to be determined The KeynesWhite committee it said did not enter into the review o trade problems The statement promised m change in the fundamental pol icies that lendlease is a wartime system only and that no articl which Britain receives unde lendlease may be reexported After the defeat of Germany l continued there will he no im pediment to the united kingdom exporting articles so far as wa conditions permit which longer supplied under lendlease and are obtained out of their own production or purchased from this country for cash To some degree lendlease aid for the united kingdom will be re duced even before the defeat of Germany It is now expected that some raw and semifabricated ma terials such as iron and steel will no longer be provided by the United States to the united king dom under lendlease after Jan 1 ites Need of Rebuilding British Trade London Minister Jhurchill revealed Thursday a arreaching British American rade arrangement whereby after he defeat of Germany lendlease vould be cut nearly in half but Sritain would pay cash for Amer can materials intended for event ual reexport from England Hammering home Britains ne sessily for and intention of re milding her largelyvanished ex port trade the prime minister told ommons that It is no part of the endlease act to provide general relief r to provide for postwar reconstruction or lo aid our ex port trade We shall pay cash for any ad ditional supplies we may wish to take from the United Slates for export purposes he declared He added that the removal of uncertainties should make it pos sible for exporters to lay plans now with assurance that they could become effective after the war with Germany ends Churchill said that after Ger manys defeat England hoped to be able to cut the lendlease in flow from America by about halt Churchill said also that his statement had been agreed to al most sentence by sentence by our American colleagues Therefore he declined to expand on it when questioned The house cheered when he said he considered the statement I have made is one of a highly sat isfactory nature has there been a more tndrough understanding of t h e facts of the economic position ant the problems of Great Britain and the United States of America on both sides than we have now been able to reach Churchill said very great ae stood us and our allies in good stead and we have never asked nor expected any assistance which is not strictly within its terms and provisions the premier declared Arrangements already had bee made in Washington he said as to what the American administra tion feel it is proper and right for us to have in accordance with th terms of the act He added The end of the war with Ger many will make possible large re ductions in some of our require ments We expect our needs will be met by a prosrram at a rate not much more than half or what we have been receiving in 19M All of these supplies and services will be exclusively for the Joint war efforts against the common enemy Churchill reminded the house that lendlease was an act which was for the defense of the United States and is strictly limited to what is necessary for the most ef fective prosecution of the war by the United States and its allies are no The prolongation of the war into what will be for us m the sixth and seventh year means that cer tain improvementsarfe essential if our national economy is to be as fully effective as possible for the prosecution of the war Churchill said Death of Judge Eicher Former lowan Puts End to Moss Sedition Trial EDWARD C EICHER Security Tax Freeze Voted by Committee Washington h e house ways and means committee Thursday voted 17 to 7 to freeze1 the social security tax which otherwise would doubleautomat ically dan i Nine committee republicans voted solidlyand were joined by 8 democrats in delivering this re buff to an administration plea that the tax be allowed to rise as provided in the basic security law The committee action risked sessionend veto fight with the white house Some democrats favoring the freeze predicted privately Mr Roosevelt will win seeing little prospect oC the necessary two third vote in both houses to over ride a veto This would mean that a month hence the security tax will be boosted from 1 to 2 per the wage and salary man paying to the security fund for each 5100 he earns as against the present rate of SI for each and the employer boosting from SI to S2 the amount he contrib utes on the basis of each ol his payroll 1945 Officials commenting on this said that only some revolutionary change in the war situation could prevent this from going into ef fect This cut will have the ef fect said the joint statement under terms of the white paper itself of removing products made from such materials from limita tions that will continue to apply to articles received under lend lease The white paper was a formal statement pt British government policy against reexporting any article received under lendlease The present declaration means that if the British want to obtain American goods for export or other commercial purposes they must pay cash since at present there is no private or public credit arrangement set up BIRTH REPORTS GIVEN DCS Jloincs the first 8 months this year 1052 boys were born in Iowa to 1000 girls state health department records showed Comparable figures for 1943 and 1942 revealed the edge held by boys was greater with 1 on lo 1000 SrJs in 1343 and 1089 boys to 1000 girls in 1942 Fatigue and abstinence carried too far and endured too long can impede the effectiveness of a peo ple at war at least as much as a more sensational form of priva After the defeat of Germany some release of manpower to in crease the supplies available for essential civilian consumption must follow in due course and some improvements in the stand arris and variety of national diet Churchill said Britain also must make a serious effort to rebuild the export trade which we delib erately gave up in the extremity of our emergency but without which we cannot live in the fu ture 3v Members of Hardin Ration Board Resign Eldora their rea sons as personal Chairman Edward H Lundy of Eldora and 2 other members of the Hardin county war price and rationing board submitted their resigna tions to the Des Moines district OPA office The members were P K Wright Iowa Falls and Frank V Beran Garden City Earlier the Rev C R Garland and Helen Wehrman both of Eldora resigned from the price panel and L W Wingert Iowa Falls quit the Jewell oil panel LITTELL FIRED BY ROOSEVELT Claim Attorney General Aide Insubordinate Washington lift President Roosevelt stepping into a redhot justice department row fired As sistant Atty Gen Norman Littell Thursday for insubordination Littell had been warring with his chief Atty Gen Biddle in ex changes that followed Biddles de mand for Littells resignation Lit tell accused Biddle of having in terfered in one justice department case in favor of Thomas G Tom my the Cork Corcoran former presidential intimate now in pri vite law practice Whether this Biddle knockout scored with white house help ends the battle entirely is problematical there remains some talk of a sen ate investigation In a statement given out at the justice department the president said When statements made by Nor man Littell first appeared in the papers I wrote to him that it was primarily an executive matter and that I hoped for his own career he would resign Since then he has volunteered a long statement thus substantia ting what the attorney general had said about his insubordina tion This is inexcusable and under these circumstances my only alter native is to remove him from of fice which I have done Thurs day Washington during the night of Presiding Justice Ed ward C Eicher Thursday appar ently brought to an end the 7 month old mass sedition trial in federal district court Eicher 65 year old former Iowa congressman died at his home in nearby Alexandria Va A justice department official de cliningio be quoted by name said he jurists death would mean that he current trial would have to be terminated and the hearing start ed all over again The 27 defendants are accused of conspiring to disaffect the loy alty of American armed forces and to set up a nazi form of govern ment in this country The trial opened last April 17 with 30 defendants One later died and 2 won severances After a summer recess the hearings have recently been con fined to afternoon sessions to per mit defense attorneys to carry on their own law practices Most of the attorneys have been serving without compensation From its outset the mass hear ing was marked by uproar and confusion Selection of a jury pro ceeded at a snails pace through out the first 2 weeks Then with the box still not filled the task had to be started from scratch again with the expiration months end ot the district cour jury panels The courtroom clamor grew to such a pitch that Eicher was forced to resort to numerous con tempt fines defense cpun All told 6 attbrheyl and a defendant were fined an aggregate of All appealed their lines to the court of appeals where the cases stiil are pending Government counsel too came in for criticism from the bench Eicher late in September formally reprimanded Chief Prosecutor O John Rogge for improper con duct in granting interviews to a newspaper and a magazine Masses of exhibits were enleree in the trial record but only afler bitter defense objections Quanti ties remained to be entered and many witnesses to be heard be fore the government would have been prepared to rest its cast Eicher who would have beer 60 years old Dec 16 was namec to the federal bench on Dec 31 1941 after serving 3 years as a member of the securities and ex change commission He resigned his house scat December 1938 near the end o his 4th term to take the SEC post He was a democrat Eicher was first elected to con gress from the first Iowa distric in 1932 and was reelectsd in 1934 1936 and 1938 As a membe of the house he served on the interstate and foreign commcro committee In the present admnistration unsuccessful attempt to purge U S Senator Guy Gillette in 1338 Eicher supported Otha D Wearin who lost to Gillette in the primary Eicher had resigned his house seat and at that time Gil lette did not oppose Eichers ap pointment to the securities and exchange commission because the senator said he regarded the ap pointment as national in scope SEARCH FOR of company A engineers combat detachment serv ing as inlantry carefully advance down a wreckage strewn street in St Die France in seaich of German snipers Associated Press wirephoto Kayenay engraving Start Tokyo Fires in Night Raid 6 DIE IN CRASH Ionia Mich of seven women war workers sharing the ride home from a plant here were fatally injured when a Grand j cold with diminishing winds passenger train demolished I rather than related to Iowa FORECAST FOR IOWA COLDER 4 Inches of Snow on Ground at Fort Dodge Des Moines mercury dropped lo a minimum for the state of 7 degrees at Sioux City Atlantic and Lamoni Thursday mowing and the weather bureau said the temperature would fall to 0 to 5 above Friday morning Snow was forecast for the northeast Thursday following light scattered flurries Wednes day night However there was as much as 4 inches on the ground at Fort Dodge the weather bureau said Council Bluffs and Ames had about 3 inches of snow on the ground Sioux City and Des Moines 2 and Spencer Lamoni Dubuque and Mason City one each The forecast for Friday was Partly cloudy and not quite so B25S LASH CAPITAL AGAIN Japs Admit Flames Out iof Control fair an Hour frashinjgrton Super fortresses bombed Tokyo once and perhaps twice during the night and the Japanese acknowledged that fires raged uncontrolled for nearly an hour after the last of the giant raiders had left The frankest Japanese commu nique yet issued on the results of a Superfortress attack said fires that continued to rage in part of the areas affected were nut under control by a m but insisted that no damage had been caused to important installations The communique said casual lies were extremely slight A brief war department an nouncement confirmed that the Superfortresses had struck Tokyo Wednesday for the 3rd time in 6 days and promised further de tails alter the bombers had re turned to their Saipan bases Radio Tokyo reported that waves OJE B29s hitting by night for the first time thundered over the cap ital dropping demolition and in bombs from p m to 2 a m a m to noon Wednesday then returned for a 2nd attack from a m to between and 5 a m The Superfortress assault served to emphasize the quickening tem po of the allout American air of fensive against Japan and her Pa cific outposts also highlighted by these developments army air forces spokes man disclosed that 372528 of the 1500000 combat sorties flown bv U S planes since Pearl Harbor were against the Japanese and said everything was being done to augment the present facilities for striking at Japan4 of the 7th air force dropped at least 165 tons of bombs on 2 air strips on Iwo in the Volcano islands 750 miles south east of Tokyo from which the Japanese have been taking off to intercept the B29s and to raid the B29 bases on Saipan American fighters sank 10 enemy transports and three destroyers attempting to reinforce the doomed Japanese garrison on Leyte Admiral Stare A MHs cher commander of the famous task force 58 said the U S navy has shot down more than 4000 Japanese naval planes in the past year and a half and had practic ally eliminated Japanese naval aviation An officidf Dome dispatch broadcast from Tokyo said para chuting flyers would be killed on the spot by angry Japanese peo ple and denounced B29 crewmen as savages and albino apes Another Tokyo propagandist charged in a broadcast for Ameri can consumption that B29 crews were not entitled to the protec tion of international law and added that the day of reckoning will surely come Sink 13 Jap Ships Trying to Reinforce Leyte Garrison Allied Headquarters Philippines UP American planes have smashed a 6th largescale Japanese attempt to reinforce the doomed their automobile Wednesday at a The maximum temperature for crossing the state Wednesday was 32 de I grccs at Davenport INDICT TEACHER FOR MURDER Wants to Enter Plea of Guilty in Slaying Rochester Minn V Gilberson 57 Minneapolis kind ergarten teacher under indictment on a first degree murder charge in the death of her room mate and fellow teacher Thursday awaited trial at the next term of Olmsted county district court opening Jan She is accused in the death of Minnie M Easthagen UO whose body was found in a Rochester hotel room Nov 21 where the 2 women had registered on Nov 18 The grand jury returned the in dictment late Wednesday after de liberating only 55 minutes fol lowing the questioning of 21 wit nesses Defense Attorneys Neil Hughes and Donald Morgan who ex pressed surprise at the severity of the indictment unsuccessfully at tempted to restrain Miss Gilber son upon her arraignment before garrison sinking 13 ships withat least 4000 troops in a 5 day battle in the Camotes Sea Gen Douglas MacArthur an nounced Thursday Two of the 10 transports sunk reached the enemy slroiiffholri ol Ormoc on the west coast of Leyte and had unloaded partly before they were sent to the bottom bul the remainder went down will virtually all hands Three escort ing destroyers also were sunk The victory boosted the enemy7 losses in 6 attempts at reinforce ment of Leyte to 21000 men 2ti transports of a total of 92750 tons and 17 escort vessels Heavy downpours continued I stymie all ground activity on Leyte except minor patrol action MacArthur said an unprecedentcc 23 Vi inches of rain had falle since the beginning of Novembei nearly twice the normal rainfal Front line troops were being sup plied in part by air Thunderbolts Licht hawks iand a small number o Mitchell bombers caucht the lales Japanese convoy wcli out in th Camotes sea Tuesday and bombec and strafed it without letup untl the last of the 10 transports am 3 destroyers had been sunk Wed nesday afternoon The transports were believei carrying nearly a lull division o troops Japanese prisoners cap hired in recent days said anothc Judge Vernon Gates from crying tured in ecerlt days said anoth I would like to enter a plea of lnfantrr dlvsion had been c 1 nortpn nl Ormnr guilty Hughes after a moment snid No you cant do that jpccted at Ormoc Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair and colder Thursday night lowest Friday morning zero Friday increas ing cloudiness but not quite so cold in the afternoon Iowa Mostly cloudy with snow flurries Thursday afternoon clearing Thursday night and Fri day winds 25 miles an hour Thursday diminishing Thurs day evening becoming 10 miles an hour Friday zero to 5 below in the west and 5 above in the cast portion Thursday night Iowa Shippers Warning Minimum temperatures Friday morning northwest 5 below southwest 2 below northeast 0 southeast 5 I above Slightly higher in cities locally 3 above in cities and 0 in surrounding country Minnesota Generally fair Thurs day night and Friday Colder Thursday night with lowest temperature 5 below to 5 above Diminishing winds IN MASON G1TY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 22 Minimum Wednesday night 13 At 8 a m Thursday 13 At 10 a m Thursday 16 Snow irace At 2 p m 17 YEAR AGO Maximum 30 Minimum 23 YANKSCAPTURE LINDERN FIGHT THROUGHBEECK Seesaw Battle Waged for Bridge at Inden in Stiff Fighting I o n d o n i n t h army Americans captured Lindern and ought STREET TO STREET hrough burning Beeck Thursday up the railroad to Munchen Glad ach in the great allied offensive iraclcmg the Roer river Unfa before ologne and Dusseldorf Survivors of the elite SS garri on of strategic Lindern were cap urcd with the town miles rom the Prussian arsenal and rail of Dlunchen Gladbacli Most if the Bceck garrison were killed he strasslcrs lied toward nearby Viirm The 1st army at the southern sncl of the critical 25 mile front m the Cologne plain captured amersdorf and Grosshau and emerged from the Plurlgen forest inelands Lt Gen Courtney H lodges troops fought a SEESAW 3ATTLE for an Inde river bridge it Inclcn winning it losing H and hen regaining the western end of the small span In the center of the western Vent the U S 3rd army held irm against a scries of counter attacks loosed from the Siegfried ine in the Saar guarding roads through the rich goal and steel region to Karlsruhe Coblenz and Frankfurt The Germans stiffened before Cologne 23 miles from nearest American guns The capture of Lindern brousht Ducsseldorf within 28 miles of American lines Slowly and inexorably the team of the 1st and 9th armies was ucdifing in between Hie flooded ftoer river citadels of Jnlich and Duren The 9lh pushed tlirpifgh Kos lar to the west bank of the flooded Roer just across from the north west lip of Julich 8600 Duren was in 3 mile field gun range Frost was hardening the ground for Lt Gen George S Patton Jr whose 3rd army consolidated its wide gains and moved for a breakout of Lorraine On the southern flank intermittent rain and snow and great grey patches of fog hampered operations on the Alsatian plain before the Rhine Lindern lies H2 miles from the Prussian arsenal and rail city of Munchen Gladbach pop 127 000 and 28 miles from Dussel dorf The 9th also fought in the streets of burning Beech nearby ISolh Bccck and Li Dcrn am on the railroad leadinjr to Munchen Gladbach Surivivors of the Lin dern parrison made up of Hitlers best SS troops were troddin through the floods and mud to prison cages They had yielded before the bombs hurled against the hamlqt Infantry driving into the Tiger tank nests in Beeck found more dead Germans on the street than in any other town yet entered on the Cologne front Prisoners said their comrades were felled by white phosphorous shells which filled the skies before dawn During the night the Germans tried vainly to regain high ground dominating the Roer river bastion nT Linnich just cnst of Beeck Ar tillery particularly Tigerbusting 3inchers smashed most of the at STATUIl HUllS H 0 5 10 15 JO 30 SAARlAUTERNl Sarbrucken HOW THIRD ARMY THREATENS Battering steadily deeper into the reich the U S 3rd army increases the threat to the large industrial city ol Saarbrucken   

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