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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, November 23, 1944 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 23, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME CQUf DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES KOINES I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT Associated Praa and United Press Full Leawd WirM MAKES ALL NORTH 1OWANS NEIGHBORS MASON MTY IOWA THURSDAY 23 1944 YANKS SMASH ON TO WARD COLOGNE U Will Enter REPORTSPREAD OF OPERATORS WALKOUT MOVE National Significance Is Assumed Washington Is Hit by Strike BULLETIN Washington An office 01 economic stabilization spokesman said Thursday that eovernmen action to end the spreadine strike of telephone operators possibly seizure of struck probably was only a few hours away Washington A growing strike women telephone opera tors assuming national signifi cance hit Washington Thursday and with it came the prospect of white house action Not only was the warbusy cap ital engulfed by the spread of walkouts which started a week ago in Dayton Ohio but the great production centers of Michigan as well Other cities were in the patch involved in the walkout Operators in the nations capital center of a network which links the united nations began walking out hours in advance of the for mal start set for 5 a m C W T Thursday Michigan Telephone Employes Federation members chose the same hour When that time came a shift of Detroit workers left their jobs and formed picket lines leaving a skeleton crew to handle essential calls In Washington picketing began simultaneously at 3 telephone company buildings but a company official said the extent of the strike would have to await a change of shifts later in the morn ing Like a thunderstorm crackling along the Hues that link city to city there were rumblings of still more strikes in answer to the Ohio Federation of Telephone Workers appeal for assislance from 41 af filiated unions Lang distance calls primarily were affected In Washington a long distance operator answered promptly short ly after 8 a m Asked if calls were being accepted she said There are a few of us here and we will do the best we can Picketing was orderly in both Detroit and Washington The shift changes here staggered over sev eral hours found only a trickle of both men and women entering the exchanges There was some goodnatured banter A company spokesman said he anticipated no serious interrup tion adding that there were enough supervisory employes with operating and maintenance ex perience to service equipment and provide skeleton staffs for subur ban exchanges not equipped with automatic dial systems No estimate was immediately available on the number of opera tors out here but the spokesman said it was large Just as tiie estimated 5000 Ohio workers flatly rejected a gotback toworkorelse order of the war labor board the 2700 Washington operators ignored another WLB message which said that any in Eisenhower Need Myriads of Shells Blankets Planes sa AUTOGRAPH FOR A Gen Dnight D Eisenhower supreme allied commander in the European theater auto graphs the cast on he leg of a wounded Yank in a hospital near the front lines in France terference with telephone service in the nations capital at this criti cal period of the war can not be The war labor board after wrestling with the Ohio dispute throughout Wednesday deferred its or else action the possibility of the government taking over until Thursday It announced Wednesday night it would refer the ease to Economic Stabiliza tion Director Fred M Vinson an action which normally pre cedes actual presentation to Presi dent Roosevelt The war production board the war department and other agencies interested themselves in the case but their officials de dined to say whether they wen taking any active part Women formed the rank and file the strike show for th first time on such a scale The strike started in a protes by Dayton operators against th granting of living expensi accounts weekly to outsider brought in to help run the switch boards Operators in 28 other Ohi cities fell in line The Washington operators saic they likewise objected to a sim ilar practice here sympathized with the Ohio strikers and in ad dition had some wage grievances as to basic pay scales Company officials have sam he practice is necessary in these times of much work and shortage of it is only fair to help outoftowners meet extra expenses Effects of the strike were quickly felt in busy Washington vhere thousands of calls are handled daily to and from war production centers and military establishments Only high priority long distance ills were accepted beginning early Wednesday night Local service on automatic dial tele phones was not affected Governor John W Bricker of Ohio directed ail appeal to every elephone employe who loves his rn fr country to respond to the all to duty and to return to work at once Bricker said he made his appeal to give our brave ighting forces what they must lave to win and to save some TT Union in J Midwest States Will Meet Des Moines meeting of tne board of directors of the Northwestern Union of Telephone the Dreading elophone workers has uitriKsiic wurfvers been called by H L Rogers eral president of the said Wednesday night union he juiij Jllgnl The head of the 5state labor organization said he didnt know where or when the meeting would be held and could issue no state e stand of locals in the owa Minnesota North f of soa orh Dakota South Dakota and Ne braska until after this meeting Earlier Miss Arle Van DvkP president of local 1541 the traffic division of the union said offi cers had decided to give moral support to the striking telephone workers in eastern states Buy your War Bonds and people to over Washington Dwigh D Eisenhower said Thursdayhi soldiers are making daily headwa by courage and suffering but the need myriads of shells and tires and guns and blankets and planes The mancom manding the gi gantic western front offensive against Ger many appealed personally to the American 10 over subscribe the Bth war loan driv and transform the money quick into vital fighling equipment It was Eisenhowers second ur gent appeal to buy war bonds H made it in a talk prepared fo broadcast from his Europea headquarters The text of th statement also was released by th treasury department Mud cold bullets and mine ields cant stop the millions o American hoys from pushin th enemy back if they are plentiful supplied and supported from th homeland Eisenhower declared The equipment is needed now he said And the soldiers must ge it from the money you lend th government He said the American fightin men are entitled to the constan assurance of your understanding of your resolution and of your un flagging zeal War loan headquarters had nt new figures for Thanksgiving day The latest progress report Wed nesday chalked up by dividuals compare with thetotal quota for individu als of The drive be gan Monday and will end Dec 16 Admiral Chester W Nimitz commander in chief of the Pacifi fleet said in a Thanksgiving daj message over the same program with Eisenhower that we giv thanks to the men and women and children on the home front Thei toil and their savings invested in war bonds have made possible the outfitting and supply of the grea fleet which has struck the so effectively And Admiral William F Hatsey Jr commander of the 3rd fleet said We five thanks that we a decent homeland to fieht for We give thanks that we have been able to keep the enemys fleet and his hltody hand from touchingthat homeland Gen Douglas MacArthur in a war bond message released by the reasury said we at the front lave complete faith in you a I home The spirit of vays in your never ailed us and we know you will upply needed money the purchase and holding of bonds 3ravda Calls for rlarsh and Complete unishment of Germany Moscow communist arty newspaper Pravda Thursday published an article bv its staff vnter David Zaslavsky calling or harsh just nnd complete pun shment for Germany He urged the destruction of the vnole state machine all masked nazi nests all central and local nazi organs all institutions where he Hitlerites duped the German eople and propagandized them nto becoming unpunished mur erers He said that the nazi party must nd will be annihilated complele y in all its forms and manifesta tions Similarly with the nazi youth rgamzations as well as leagues of azi veterans he said No amouflaged athletic or musical ircles where the nazis will seek o escape under innocent desisna ons must be left them He urged that particular alien on be paid German universities na schools where nazi youths light organize underground units SMASH 75 JAP SHIPS BARGES OFF LEYTE ISLE American Flyers Blast Nipponese Who Still Slip Aid to Troops By LEONARD MILLEHAN Associated Press War Editor Seventyfive more Japanesi ships and barges many of them laden with reinforcements for en circled Japanese on Leyte island have been sunk or damaged bj American warplanes ranging al most unopposed over the Philip pines and Borneo But Gen Dougrlas MacArthur indicated the enemy is still slip Ping reinforcements and supplies into embattled Leyte under cover of night Forty barges were wrecked by strafing V S fighter near the port of Ormoe after they had discharged their cargoes Eighteen craft ranging from barges to coastal freighters were sunk or damaged by PT boats and bombcarrying freighters as thej tried to reach Ormoc with supplies or troops Most of the other craft were ac counted for by Adm Chester W Ninntz in a revised total of dam age inflicted by carrier planes that hit Manila and other Luzon island portslast Sunday They bombed and strafed a total of 17 ships in cluding a damaged cruiser Nimitz had previously reported only three all in Manila bay Japanese commanders have al ready drawn heavily on reserves available Eeyte Douglas MacArthur reported bolster the Lirnon stronghold Hie north anchor of the Yam ashita line where the enemy wns apparently elected to make hi principal stand Continuing Yank pressure on Uimon and scattered patrol activ y was reported by MacArthnr Deep mud and intricate Japanese defense prevented any major ac The dismal China picture was brightened somewhat by a new advance along the Burma road and an announcement by Maj Gen Albert C Wedemeyer that Gen eralissimo Chiang KaiShek has accepted an American plan for defense of central China Wedemeyer new U S com mander in China indicated that Yank forces would eventually our over the Burma road and off he landing ramps of invasion raft for major battles of the Pa ific war which will be fought iri tnna Despite their gains in China he said the Japanese were ter ibly concerned about their over 11 position Tokyo radio added no comfort o Japanese feelings by reporting nofher Superfortress reconnais auce flight over eastern Honshu lie main island of Japan The onfirmcd report said the B29 pparcntly came from a Marianas ase On the Salwcen front of south est China allied troops wiped apanese off another stretch of he Burma road in a threepronged rive on Chefang next objective n their push toward the Burma order No change was reported in the Nipponese threat to central China kirn Nazi SS Men Shot 5 U S Airmen Zurich Frontier reports aid that 5 American airmen who arachuted to earth during the st U S air attack on Friedrichs afen were rounded up and shot y bS men The local population ccordmg to reports protested the xecutions fearing American rc Iiation YANKS WADE IN FLOODS TO SALVAGE AMAIUNITION in firing position in a flooded area on the front S2nb crew roll up GI pants to salvage ammunition from the 1 iKh wateT conditions which tend to slow allied advance into German ith tank lined up tank Bomber Without Crew for 5 Hours Falls in Minnesota 8th Army Clears Nazi i liJiiCjj nut I identified Wednesday night as Sioux City army air base plane by Col W A commandant Col Dawson said the number of the plane was furnished base of ficials by a Minnesota forest ranger The 10 uninjured members of Ine crewwere rounded op in the iicihltyot which they bailed out when they were unable to feather be pro peller of a dead engine Base of ficiate said the crewmen reported the ship had begun to vibrate and there was a threat of fire At Sioux Falls S Dak where the airmen were taken Maj H A Patterson army air field pub ic relations officer there said the men would be returned here Thursday He said he spent the afternoon in the vicinity of Mar ion picking up the crew and lettisoned goods including 10 3ombs and ammunition Pilot of the B17 identified icre as Lt Colin I Park Glen Ridge N stayed with the dane after the rest the crew umped Major Patterson said but ae bailed out too when the ship ost altitude Alarms were sent out over state radios in several slates Wednesday when it was learned a crewless plane was flyinsr over the midwest The automatic pilot had been et before the ship was aban doned At Chicago fire stations vere alerted and civil and mili ary authorities notified to be on he lookout It was the 3rd time that a bomber had flown over own in 18 months with no cas jalties reported in any of the ases Forces Out of Cosina River Loop in Italy army troops battling strong enemy resistance have clearer theGermans out of the Cosma river loop less than 4 miles southeast of Faenza and cap tured a few more villages in sub NAZI COUNTER DRIVES FIERCE Reds Inch Way Ahead Knock Out 43 Tanks Moscow assault forces inched closer Thursday to t n e Hungarian communications strongpoints of Halvan BRer and Miskolc in grim hand to hand fighting along the 85mile battle line northeast of Budapest TT I M and deep mud Slowed Marshall Rodion V Malinovskys offensive but the soviet commun ique listed G villages captured ind 1J German tanks knocked out against fierce countorattaclcs by stantial gains in that area below I rgumst tercc countorattaclcs by the BolognaRimini highway al Uunsanaii and SS elite guard hed headquarters annoiinrprl umls tj hed headquarters announced Thursday Polish troops have conlinued their advance beyond bitterly con tested Mount Fortino and captured the villages of Oriolo San Biagio and San Mamante Farther to the west 5th army Indian troops occupied important ground north of captured Modigli ana Weather Report FORECAST lason City Fair and chilly Thursday night Lowest tem perature Thursday night 26 in Mason City 15 Friday fair and mild TN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 33 Minimum Wednesday night 23 At 8 a m Thursday 30 YEAR AGO Maximum 39 Minimum jg and Buy your War Bonds anu Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Thanksgiving came Thursday to American fighting men in the full tide of a turkey wine and a prayer a prayer of confi dence and hope from a nation in us 3rd wartime observance of a great American tradition Many civilian tables throughout the country were lacking turkcy but there was no lack of it for soldiers and sailors at home and abroad The war department proclaimed turkey a must for the man in the trenches while those in hospitals training areasand combat sta tions also feasted on King Tom me navy served nnn dnners the 12000 000 pounds of young roast torn turkey set aside to supply its Christmas and New The army assured that cooked dinners were being carried very close to the fighting lines and the navy alloted a pound for each man m the continental United States with an extra half pSund battle 3t sea a The townsfolk of Plymouth of the first Thanks givingobserved the day in a manner symbolic of the spirit of With Turkey Wing nd Prayer the na Westminster Abhev throughout the n tion and near the battlefronts There was morning prayer to be followed by heir most elaborate wartime fcast day and an evening tableaux with a cast of Pilgrim descendants The Plymouth pro grams were scheduled for broad cast over regular and shortwave channels While traditional church sere ices were being held throughout the nation religious services were also taking place at every army post on battle areas In London Ambassador John G Winant read President Roosevelts I h a n k s giving proclamation in Westminster Abbey The town of England was to entertain 100 American soldiers and nurses at an evening Thanksgiving ball with music provided by U S army bands In Cherbourg France French civilians and British troops joined Americans in a festival evening at the municipal theater Courtney H Hodges told his troops of the U S first army driving inside Germany along he approaches to Cologne 1S enough for us to know that because of you people of all tne world today are giving thanks to God Almighty who has made possible your vast achievement On thCjhome front war plants remained on full production schedule but stores and mercan tile firms closed generally Because of the calendar quirk which produced 5 Thursdays this month there again was a mixup over the holiday date Fortyone states and the District of Colum bia followed the federal statute in celebrating today Arkansas Idaho Nebraska Ten nessee Texas and Virginia will have their legal state holidays on the 5th Thursday Nov 30 Geor gia will have 2 Thanksgivings today by gubernatorial proclama tion and next Thursday by state law CLAIM HITLER DOUBLE USED London Express Cites Evidence in Picture London Daily Express said Thursday it had incontest able proof that the nazis had been using a double as a front for Adolf Hitler since the July attempt on his life The ncwnaper said the latest official picture of Hitler was proved a fake by an car identifica tion test The picture published here last Thursday showed Hit ler1 decorating Leon Dcgrcllc Belgian fascist leader The Express submitted the pic ture to an aural surgeon who after examination said it unquestion ably was not Hitler The surgeon said Hitlers ears are stubby while those of the man in this picture were elongated and showed only a shallow curve inside the top in contrast with a large curve in Hitlers ear The Express said Hcinrich Himmler had carried out a virtual coup detat forcing nazi leaders to accept him as dictator in place of Hitler The Express printed a detailed account of the asserted coup al leging it occurred Nov 1 at a secret meeting of the nazi hier archy at Oranienburg near Berlin The meeting was alleged to have been called by Hitlers deputy Martin Bormann to find a way out of the situation created by Hitlers inability to direct the af fairs of the rcich and the conduct of the war Himmler was said o have marched in on the meeting told the nazis that he was taking over leadership of the party and backed up his declaration by pointing out that the building was surrounded by his SS troops Paul Joseph Goebbels propa ganda minister supported Himm ler and the other nazi leaders were forced to accede the dispatch said EXPUBLISHER HELD Paris BunauVarilla former publisher of Le Matin was under arrest Thursday on charges ot intelligence with the enemy Front dispatches emphasizing the vigor of the nazi defense re ported 12 counterattacks were repulsed at HevizGyor a own just south of the BudapestHatvan railway captured Wednesday by the Russians The soviet communique said further gains were made in the NAZIS USE BEST MEN IN EFFORT TO HALT DRIVE Only Spotty Resistance Is Encountered Before Strasbourg by Allies London American 9th army troops drove through deep mud and German steel into the Roer valley villages of Koslar and Barmen Thursday in a slow ad vance toward Cologne 26 miles away on the Rhine are north of the Hitler superhighway from Aachen 10 Berlin and it was along this wide concrete road that the Ger mans had massed Hie best and most of their troops in the west Below the road aih army troops entered Bourheim Pattern and Lorn to form a battering ram 6 miles wide and pointed directly at the bombravaged Khineland arsenal city of 768000 A cold pelting rain driven by gales added to the miseries of ferocious German resistance it denied air support for the col umns of infantry tanks and can non moving through the thickly fortified zone before the Rhine The Roer and its affluents were blooded On the allied southern flank American infantry and French tanks fanned out on the flat Rhine Plain less than 18 miies from Strasbourg capital of Alsace Lorraine in a complete break through of resistance so spotty that the crack allied assault teams were opposed by some nazis who have been in the army less than a month One company was composed entirely of DEAF Germans The implication was obvious Marshal von Rundstedt was GIV ING UP Lorraine and doubtless Alsace tooMosave what ha could from the debacle of the Vbsjjes mountain front where it was es a days ago that 70 000 troops of the enemys 19th army were nailed against the Rhino and caught between allied forces less than GO miles apart through the Saverne and BMfort Craps French in the south ad vanced 4 miles from Mulhouse to Battenheim area of fallen Gynongyos strong hold in the foothills of the Matra mountains from which red army tanks were fanning out in the huge sweep around Budapest toward Czechoslovakia and invas ion routes to southern Germany The early morning supplement or the soviet communique broke several days of official silence about East Prussia and the erea above Warsaw reporting the re pulse of a German reconnoitering outfit in East Prussia and heavy patrol combat around the Polish town of Ptillusk Otherfise the bulletins said there was only minor action along the rest of the eastern front The souny weather of rain snow nd foe kept allied air poivcr aground The whole allied air force was grounded Wednesday except for a few sorties in the south The Aaciien front was a series of deep pools of mud and water in which American tanks and ar tillery slugged it out with new King Tiger tanks at point blank range for the Roer river city of Julich a mile and a half east of Kostar The Tigers bearing Ginch armor lurked in ruined towns on the allied side of the Roer Infan trymen and tank specialists said the battle before Julich was the fiercest struggle they had fought m this war British forces in Holland moved to within 2 miles of Venlo in the great bend of the Maas th the A PCKET NAZIS Driving northward of the 6th army have ad rnd 22 north of Mulh4e to trap German army with its back to the river 1600 square miles the offensive and liberated 433 towns and villages The Rhine stronghold of Strasbourg was threatened   

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