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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 22, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 22, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COM OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVE IKES IA Associated Press and United Press FiiU Leased wires THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Five Cento a Copy MASON CITy IOWA WEDNESDAY KOVEMBEK 22 1944 ADVANCE SWIFTLY ON SOUTH FRONT 2 SUPERFORTS DOWNED BY JAP FIGHTER CRAFT Marks First Time Nipponese Airmen Bagged B29 Planes Washington IP Superfort resses plunging into probably their greatest air battie over thi Japanese homeland Wednesday los 2 and possibly 3 of their numbe to enemy fighter planes A communique said Wednesday it was the first time the Japanese airmen had succeeded in bagging a B2 since inauguration of th 20th bomber command las June 15 Twenty Japanese fighters were shot down 19 probably lost am 22 others damaged in the 3 pronged strike by a large force o B29s from China aiming prin cipally at the Omura aircraf plant on Kyushu the southern most home island of the JapaneS archipelago Tokyo radio broadcasts claimed that 60 of the B29s were sho down or damaged over Kyushu and China as a result of the Su perfortresses Tuesday operations The broadcasts as usual mini mized damage and Japanesi Josses None of our planes were lost a the 2 secondary targets ports o Nanking and Shanghai military facilities The communique ex plained weather conditions forceu partial diversion of the assault on Omura Two B29s definitely were los io enemy fighters in the mission to Omura and one other is unre ported under circumstances which lead to the Presumption that it is lost 20th air force headquarter said It added that the Josses results from whatearly reports indicate the largesraTfEaHleiH which the Superfortresseshave been en gaged The largest loss of the aeria giants through enemy action as reported by official communiques was 4 on Aug 20 when relatively strong fighter opposition was en countered in a smash at Yawata industrial gargets on Kyushu However Wednesdays commun ique shows that the Japanese air men shot down no Superfortresses before Wednesday Presumably theYawata Josses when Ameri cans accounted for IS to 28 enemy fighters were due to antiaircraf fire At Yawata as over Omura Tues day the operations were in dav light An unofficial compilation from 22 communiques issued prior to Wednesdays showed 13 the huge planes lost or missing on raids Whether any of those unac counted for later turned up is not disclosed PROBE DEATH AT ROCHESTER Minneapolis Teacher Heid for Questioning Rochester Minn Hies Wednesday awaited an au topsy report on the cause of a mysterious death in a hotel room here involving 2 middleaged Minneapolis kindergarten teach ers one the victim and the other being held for questioning The dead teacher is Minnie M Easthagen about 60 who taught at Fulton school Her friend and roommate Nellie V Gilbertson 57 who taught at Audubon Mand Lake Harriet schools was trans ferred from Hennepin county jail to Rochester early Wednesday morning Both lived in Minneap olis Miss Easthagens body was foxmd only Tuesday in the hotel room at Rochester after police re ceived a call from a Minneapolis physician who reported that Miss Gilberlson had told him about her roommates strange death over the weekend County Attorney Thomas Scan Ion who ordered Miss Gilbertsons arrest said there was evidence in the room indicating that Miss Easthagen might have been slain Production Resumed at Gary Steel Plant Gary Ind was resumed Wednesday at the Gary Works of the CarnegieIllinois Steel corporation the worlds largest steel plant after 39 strik ing pit cranemen voted to return to their jobs pending a settlement of their dispute which had 5500 men idle for 2 days Reds Battle tendon tanks and riflemen supported by the guns the red fleet slashed deep into J last pocket of German resist ance on the southern tip of Saare island Wednesday in a bitterly contested drive to reopen the Gulf of Riga and break the nazi block ade on Riga harbor Far to he south German coun xblows and driving rains that churned the Hungarian battle fields into a quagmire stalled the red armys enveloping sweep on Budapest almost to a standstill Marshal HotJion Y Malinovskys 2nd Ukrainian aimy hacked out limited gains all along the 80mile front extending northeastward from Budapest but the ceaseless rains and stiffened enemy resis ter tance prevented breakthrough any decisive Both Moscow and Berlin hinted strongly that the uneasy lull on the eastern front was about to end in a mighty Russian offensive perhaps simultaneously in Poland and east Prussia where the nazis recently have been reporting im mense concentrations of soviet men and material One Berlin spokesman said 7 to 8 red army divisions possibly 100000 or more men already had sons over to the attack in eastern Czechoslovakia in a bid to break otf the German salient jutting Into the Russian lines in the Czech Hungarian border area Theearly morning soviet war communique as usual ignored the German reports focusing instead on the noquarter battle raging on Saare island All organized enemy resistance on the 1010 square mile Estonian island appeared to be crumbling swiftly under the concerted soviet blows from land and sea Hemmed into a narrow corner 4 miles wide and about 1 miles deep on the southern extremity ofServe pen Jrappednazis fought back desperately but With little or no chance of survival Units of Marshal Leonid A Go vorovs Leningrad army joined by amphibious troops landed from the Baltic fleet stormed through a powerful chain of fortifications thrown across the 2mile neck of the peninsula Tuesday The barri caded towns of Rahuste and Kaimri along with 17 other farm and fishing villages were taken by the Soviets as they moved in for the kill Russian warships patrolled the shores of the island to prevent any German evacuation and poured a drumfire shells into the ring of nazi coastal batteries and air dromes that for months had com manded the 17 mile wide Irbeni strait linking the Baltic sea with the Gulf of Riga Weather Report FORECAST Iowa Cloudy with snow flurries Wednesday followed by fair and mild Thursday daytime winds Moderate Minnesota Clearing with little change in temperature Wednes day night Thursday clear and mild IN MASON CITY HobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 33 ATinimum Tuesday night 27 At 8 a m Wednesday 27 Precip snow YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 01 inch LOSE MORE VESSELS MS AIRMEN Yanks Battle Ahead Through Mud in North Leyte Island Fight By LEONARD MILLLMAN Associated Press War Editor Mudcaked American infantry men knocked out Japanese de fenses on northern Leyte island piece by piece Wednesday as offi cial communiques added to the mounting enemy losses of men ships and planes in the western Pacific Thirteen more Nipponese ships were sunk ranging from a cruiser blown up at the Brunei naval base on Borneo to a schooner Another warship perhaps a cruiser was also hit at Brunei Five warships have been bombed there in 4 days Nearly 9000 more Japanese were killed or captured by U s marines and soldiers mopping up in the Marianas and western Caro line islands A total of 63388 dead enemy troops have been counted and 3267 taken prisoner on Sal pan Guam and Tinian of the Mari anas and Peleliu and Angaur of the Palau group At least 40 and possibly 57 more imperial aircraft were destroyed Of these 20 confirmed probables were shot down uy Superforts over Japans Omura aircraft center during the first major test of B29s in combat in 8 strikes at Nippon proper Adverse weather prevented observation of the precision bombing and divert ed some Superforts to raids Nanking and Shanghai Reshuffling of about a dozen high ranking officers in the im perial army topped by a change in the command of all invading forces in was reported by radio The war annouqced lien Yasuji Okamura commander in north China has replaced Field Marshal Gen Shunroku Hata as commander in chief of all expedi tionary forces in China Both have recently been report ed m south China where Hala this week completed his successful campaign of bisecting the country and eliminating advanced U S air bases Hata becomes inspector general of military education In the Philippines campaign the Japanese made another futile counterattack against a U S 24th Jivision road block on northern Leyte in a costly attempt to reach Limon and relieve the crack im perial 1st division which Gen Douglas MacArthur said is being sacrificed in a desperate effort to retain this critical position The U S 32nd division contin ued hammering at interlaced de enses north Limon crux of ie campaign MacArthur com mented the rugged terrain of the mountain pass ideally suited to defense compels timeconsuming Jiecemeal destruction of enemy i 11 b o x e s entrenchments and pockets of resistance in order to minimize our losses jarner Former Vice Is Now 76 Uvalde Texas Nance rarner was 75 years old Wednes day The former vice president of he United States has been living quietly here since Jan 20 1941 vhen he administered the vice presidential oath to his successor Henry A Wallace iiisr vi t YANK KILLED NEAR JEEP ON LEYTE A Yinlr i PHONE WORKERS STAY ON STRIKE Ohio Operators Invite National Unions Aid Wodehouse Arrested for Aid to Germans by Broadcasts from Berlin in police judiciare nesday 941 the disclosed Wed author was talcea into custodj with him 2 nights ago but wa released Wednesday It was understood the British embassy was negotiating in the affair and Brit ish subject arrested in Frances wholesale roundup of alleged col likely to be released on the condition he leave France The creator of Jeeves the im peccable gentlemans gentleman and a cohort of giddy Englishmen of what might be called the cafe society set was caught in the naz sweep through France in 1940 while he and his wife were giving a cocktail party at their Le Tou quet villa Mrs Wodehouse was released Her humorist husband spent a year in a nazi internment camp Ir June 1941 he was shifted to a room at the Adlon hotel in Berlin after accepting a German proposal ihat he broadcast nonpolitical my talks over the nazi radio f wouldnt have missed m present experiences for the world ie said in Berlin on June 25 after he received the full freedom of rermany He said he was broadcasting once a week to the United States yy arrangement with the German foreign about his personal experiences with no politics I never have been able to work up a belligerent feeling he said hen Just as I am about to feel belligerent about some country I meet some nice fellow from it and ose all my belligerency Commenting on Wodehouses in T G WODEHOUSE in Paris said Mr feeling the London Daily Mirror Wodehouse is fortunate He hasnt seen the great areas of London Coventry Liverpool and other cities flattened by his hun nish hosts He hasnt heard the rattle of machine gun lire as gor rillas the luftwaffe spray bul ets at British seamen strugglm in the water Jeeves may speak softly to us from the radio in Berlin The worlds greatest gentlemans gen tleman may purr as he never purred before but the lads down at the Drones club will never ap prove Never never never You say you cant work up any jelligerent feeling Wodehouse That again is where you are dif erent from the ordinary Briton 36 just calls it hate And one of he things he hates most Wode house is a man who lets down his own country HOUSE PASSES CROP INSURANCE Reverses Stand Taken on Measure in 1943 Washington M Reversing a 343 stand the house Wednesday passed a federal insurance pro gram to protect the nations farm rs from future cron losses By a roll call vote of 254 to 16 he house sent to the senate a measure indorsed by both major political parties providing im nediate insurance for wheat cot on and flax crops Eventually its crms will be extended to protect practically all grain fruit and growers The bit itself contains no fi nancing and sponsors said they ouldnt estimate the cost of the rogram The house killed a lim ted crop insurance program last ear because members said it was too costly telephone workersWednesday re jected a war labor board demand that they return to work and lead ers said they would invite any assistance national union af filiates care to give In the face of a WLB pledsc to do everything in its power to halt the spreading walkout Kob ert G Pollock president of the Independent Ohio Federation of Telephone Workers announced the decision to solicit support of the national federations 41 affiliated unions Ernest Weaver a member of the national unions executive board earlier had said the board would meet to consider the possibility of a nationwide strike Pollock said no appeal was con templated at this time to the na tional federation itself Leadsrs emphasized at the hearing that the component federations arc au tonomous The agency previously had set a 9 a m CWT deadline for the strikers to go back to their posts or face government seizure of company facilities N P Feinsinger presiding over the WLB hearing told union lead ers theirs was the only such case within his knowledge where union leaders have failed o make an affirmative recommendation that a strike be ended J J iUoran of New York vice president of the National Fcdera lion Association of Telephone Workers said what further action the national federation will take will depend entirely on what fur ther request we receive from the Dhio federation Ernest Weaver a national union xeculive board member earlier nad said the union board would meet to consider the situation facing us regarding thepossibility of a nationwide strike MBER IS Rip Germany TAKENINNORTH FLANK THRUST London German radio indicated Wednesday that allied planes from Italy were striking into XSermany from the south fol lowing up Tuesday nights attack by upwards of 1000 RAF bombers from Britain on Ruhr oil plants and nazi rail targets An estimated 7000 tons of ex plosives were dropped in TuesT day nights assault the second Urgescaled allied blow against Germanys war vital oil reserves within 12 hours The night assault followed a daylight attack by 1250 Ameri can heavy bombersescorted by a record fleet ot more than 1100 fighters Forty bombers and 17 fighters failed to return from the American operation but some were believed to have landed away from their home bases In addition to the Ruhr oil plants the RAF bombers hit Aschaffenburg railway junction i miles southeast of Frankfurt The American daylight force met fierce opposition from the nazt air force m battering refineries at Hamburg and Harburg and the large Leuna synthetic oil plants at MOrseburg with 4000 tons of bombs The Americans blasted 73 Ger man fighters out of the sky and destroyed G more on the ground Declares Nubbins Has Only Chance in 10 to Survive Illness Denver year old Forest Nubbins Hoffman of Cheyenne Wyo has only one chance in 10 to live Thats the opinion o a Denver urologist who Tuesday night ex amined the little fellow who had his Christmas last Sunday because death might beat a regularly scheduled Santa to the Holfman home The doctor who asked that his name not be used ordered a trans fusion as a tonic and not be cause the boy has lost any blood and said he had only a 10 per cent chance of recovery Nubbins disease is the result a congenital obstruction at the neck his bladder One kidney has been destroyed and the other badly damaged the doctor said Starts Sentence for Violating Rent Ceiling San Francisco Taylor San Francisco apartment house owner whose 2year fight with the OPA reached the U S supreme court was taken to the county jail Tuesday to start serv ing a 6month sentence for vio lating OPA rental ceilings The sentence was passed 2 years ago and the landlord had been at lib erty under bail pending his appeals The supreme court re fused a writ of review circuit court refused a sentence stay of E Forgotten Man in Cig Shortage Omaha The forgotten man of the cigaret shortage is not the overworked banker the icrvous stenographer or the tired is the sniper Why its a shame the way heyre doin one sidewalk con noisseur complained here They smoke em til the ashes drop be hind their teeth Then again you reach for one that looks like a pip and find its one of those hand rolled jobs that give you a chew every time you try to smoke it Its really tough One policeman told of a man who was sniping butts The man said he was no bum just a la borer desperate for a smoke Thats another thing the pro fessional sniper said Youre not only fighting the trade but these amateurs too Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazelle earner boy ATTORNEY HISE DIES Des Monies Hise 71 Des Moines attorney and president of the Iowa Bar asso ciation in 193031 died Tuesday He had suffered n stroke at his home a week ago French Armies Reported to Be Within 19 Miles of Strasbourg London If Mulhouse and Metz fell Wednesday to allied armies driving swiftly upon the Hhine through the shattered Ger man front in AlsaceLorraine and the Pmis radio said the French were within IS miles oC Stras bourg In operations less spectacular but oi major Importance allied troops on the northern flank of the front captured the smashed German city of Eschweiler 28 miles from the limits of battered Cologne The town once a man ufacturing center for Teller mines and airplane parts was one of the key defense points on the Co logne plain It is on the wide Adolf Hitler highway from Aachen to v Berlin The Paris report said French troops had captured Savcrne in the gap leading from fallen Sar rcbourg to Strasbourg capital Alsace Lorraine and largest French city in enemy hands Headquarters advices placed the U S 7lh army 23 miles away Gen Eisenhowers communique said allied infantry and armor were plunging cast agsinst crumbling resistance on a wide front The whole German 19tli army ot 70000 or so survivors was in imminent peril part oE its staff i was captured at Mulhouse by the French Jirst army French troops are at the gates j ot Colmar after advancing 22 Miles from Mulhouse Charles De Gaulle broadcast report recorded federal communications commis sion Colmar a city of 46000 is capital of upper Alsace the cen ter of G roads and 40 miles south of Strasoourg The U S ninth army hacked out important but less spectacular gams within sight of the Roer river on the Aachen front In bitter weather and against savage resis tance Lt Gen William H Simp sons men captured high ground overlooking Linnich and Julich on the Roer first major Terrain barrier on the Cologne plain They fought around Front hoven Berlin said a tank spear head has reached Bourheim 25 miles from the western limits of the ruins of Cologne The British second army smashed the German bridgehead opposite Roermond key river city on the Maas and ad vanced within 3miles of Venlo UIL re f ui nd the north along the river The Germans clung to Roermond itself which is east of the Maas but Britons with bayonets cleaned out the last nests resistance on the west bank The breakthrouRii of the U S 7lh anil the French 1st armies on Ine southern end of the western Front crascil a definite German front aloiiff the northern slope of fr JUGGERNAUT MOVES ONA51 along the 400 front in Germany the allied juggernaut moves on spectacular gains made by British French and Amer ican armies   

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