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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 19, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - September 19, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             i u4iiJG NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOU Associated Proa and United Proa TiiTl Tinmrt Wins Five Cents Copy MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 19 1944 This Oraiiitl at Two NO ZM Big Welcome to Americans inGayParee By W EARL HALL GlobeGazette Managing Editor Letter No 20 Paris S Army Bomber gay Pa ree once more The manifestations of this gay ety were many and spectacular as bumping along in an army re conaissance car I entered the great French capital city late this Sunday aft ernoon in com pany with 2 American sol diers 2 war cor respond e n t one a Brazilian a fellow American edi tor Fred Chris tophe r s o n of Sioux Falls S Dak It is just 8 days since U S sol diers entered the town and the novelty of Americans hasnt yet worn off the sol diers in our greeted like conquering heroes Parisians lined the streets by 4 the thousands All along the way they waved and threw kisses in our direction When we stopped for directions as we did severa times crowds gathered around us All were insistent on touching the WE CROSS RHINE HOLLAND HAUL band of an American After 4 long years under the German heel painfully restrainec if not actually abused the Pa freedomloving people a full appreciation of their liberators And theyre crediting Americans with the achievement During the evening I mingled with the crowds at the Grand ho tel the Cafe de la Paix on the Champs Ely sees and in the his toric Place de la Concorde It was their first Sunday evening of real freedom since June 1940 They had thrown all cares to the winds This jubilation over a reclaimed liberty was my first and most pronounced impression of Paris The contrast between Paris and London in the matter of material DEWEY LASHES LABOR POLICIES OF DEMOCRATS Next Speech to Be Directed Against Idea of Indispensable Man En Boute to Portland with Dewey Thomas E Dewey swiftly shifted his cam baign attack on the new deal Tuesday to aim a blow at what many regard as the heart of the democratic appeal for reelection with a speech scheduled Tuesday night in the Portland Ore Ice Palace on the subject Is There an Indispensable Man Obviously elated at he yelling whistling reception given his slug ging assault on the administra tions labor record at Seattle Mon day night the republican presi dential nominee made the short train hop to Portland for his 2nd major speech of his west coast vote drive The New York governor already has announced that he intends to attempt to prove before November that no one man is indispensable to the operation of this govern ment and he promised a detailed outline of his views in Tuesday nights speech to be broadcast at p m central war time damage was my 2nd Whereas theEnglish capital ITS THE SAME STORY NOW IN HOLLAND FOR prisoners are marched past trenches they themselves occupied before their capture in Holland by allied forces which effected an airborne invasion to cut off great nazi armies stationed in the Dutch country This is a United States army signal corps radiophoto presents deep scars from blitz bombs and fly bombs Paris seem ingly has escaped with no more surface wounds there a building has been visibly damaged by a heavy shell Many havebeen pierced machine or tommy gun fire by But the city as a whole looks almost exactly as I remember it from my visit here 17 years ago The buildings are standing The avenuesare broad and beautiful The parks especially the Tuiller ies present a scene of beauty even if the grass and shrubbery are not as neatly cropped as be fore the nazis took over In Cherbourg I gained the im reported France is without beautiful wom en I was dead wrong about that I hadnt seen Paris Here feminine pulchritude abounds Mostly however the beauty is based on that indefinable some thing in the Paris women folks which enables them to look chic in anything they wear Theres a style about them even when they clomp along in woodensoled shoes as most of them do InCherbourg there was a tend ency to look upon the Germans as a business opportunity They had bought at high prices the foodstuffs produced on that rich peninsula The Americans came in with bombs and heavy guns and de stroyed homes It was part of the liberation program But to a simple peasant mind that aspect of what happened was a little far fetched If the attitude toward Americans wasnt actually resent ful it was at the very least luke warm Here in Paris and in Rennes LeMannes Chartres and other towns we passed through in comr ing here the attitude is vastly different At the moment and theres no question about this Americans areacehigh with the people of interior France Germans like regimentation the French hate it Theyve been regi mented for 4 long years Ameri cans are credited with releasing them from their bondage Thats why for the moment at least Americans are so popular With a sympathetic crowd cheering hims on Dewey sailed into the new deal night with an attack on what he de scribed as home front quarrel ing bickering and confusion About 8000 persons packed themselves into Seattles civic au ditorium to hear the governor and hundreds listened in an adjacent park where loudspeakers were provided Punching at the Roosevelt ad ministration with the charge that it was for the most serious wartime strikes fiewey told a crowd which in cluded many war workers but few persons in service uniforms that there has been no chart or com pass for labor in the new deal I refuse to believe the nom inee shouted workers in this country will play the role of supplicants to any throng I re fuse to believe that any than or group of men can deliver any sec tion of our people by holdingthe power of government over then heads as a club As an alternative Dewey offered a republican labor platform which boiled down called for the ap pointment of a secretary of labor from union ranks recentralization of governmental labor functions in the department the abolition of wasteful competing bureaus and the cessation of any privi DANISH POLICE STATIONS TAKEN Stockholm JP Copenhagen dispatches said that the Germans had occupied all government buildings including parliament in Danish capital and all po lice stations through Denmark in a lightning move shortly before noon Tuesday The report said the Germans staged a false air alarm over Den mark and while citizens took shelter the nazis moved into the building The Free Danish press service said the occupation order was is sued at gestapo headquarters in days ago lege for one group over any other group He laid the blame for strikes at the door of the white house de claring The chief blame goes di rectly intothe white house and to its agency created at the top of all this chaos of war labor board That board he continued has supreme control over the vi tal matters of wages and condi tions of employment Whether by j design or sheer incompetence its practice has been to months sometimes issuing decisions This policy of delay delay and more delay serves only the new deal and its political ends This policy of delay Dewey went on had set the stage for a great big favor to la bor before election gesture carefully designed to make labor believe that something it is justly entitled to Is a special gift from on high from the new deal The nominee did not explain the nature of this expected ges ture but it seemed apparent that he was hinting at the possibility of an upward revision in the Lit tle Steel wage formula For 12 straight years of new deal bungling he said the de partment of labor has been left in the hands of an estimable lady who has been secretary of labor in name only For all practical purposes we have neither a secretary of labor nor a department of labor today We need a secretary of labor We need a department of labor Twelve years is too long to go without them Sixteen years would be intolerable Dewey dismissed the Smith Conhally act as a failure which will terminate with the end of the war as it should The act was passed Over presidential veto It was introduced in both houses by democrats and passed with strong republican support over the op position of some new dealers and then was repassed over the veto Dewey said strikes had in creased onethird since its pas sage despite provisions outlawing secret service walkouts in war industries taken Copenhagen 3 over by the government The provisions of this law and the other new deal interferences with free collective bargaining should never be renewed he said Those who would turn back the course of collective bargaining are doomed to bitter disappoint ment Dewey said We are not going back to any thing he declared fiercely not to bread lines not to leaf raking not to settling labor disputes with gunfire and gas bombs not to wholesale farm foreclosures not to another new deal depression with 10 million unemployed PORT OF BREST SMOKING RUINS Nazis Report Retreat to Le Crozon Peninsula London great French port of Brest was only smoking ruins Tuesday and the surviving German garrison has retreated to the Lie Crozon peninsula just south of the harbor Roadstead for a last ditch stand the German high command communique said Tuesday The last days of elements ot 3 German divisions besieged since Aug 6 appeared at hand Thou sands of artillery shells and aerial bombs had been loosed upon them At one time the nazi com mander Lt Gen Hermann Ramcke had up to 18000 men in Brest and the Brittany ports of Americans Driving Toward Climactic Struggles for 2 Islands in Strategic Palaus By LEONARD MILUMAN Associated Press War Editor American ground forces fighting over some of the toughest ter rain of the Pacific war drove Tuesday tpward the climactic battles for 2 islands in the strategic Palau group as Tokyo radio indicated U S warplanes may already operating against the Philippines from a 3rd islanduiyaded only last week War correspondents reported from Teleliu islandin southern Palau that first division marines had knocked out all of the Japa nese tanks and most of their harassing artillery Nearly 5500 enemy dead more than half the estimated garrison were killed in the first 4 days The principal town Asias 2 CLAIM MILLION RED TROOPS IN BALTICS DRIVE Nazis Admit Outlook Critical as Huge Soviet Force Attacks London reports said Tuesday that the Russians had thrown 63 divisions or nearly 1000000 troops into a big offen sive in the Baltic states Moscow radio indicated the Ger mans may be attempting to evac uate their estimated 200000 men from the region Berlin broadcast said an all out soviet attack on Warsaw from the suburb of Fraga was expected but the Baltic fighting Is over shadowing all other action in the east The Germans admitted the Bal tic situation was critical There the Russians spread huge forces along a 170mile front from near the Latvian capital of Riga to Es tonia The soviet communique again failed to mention the Warsaw sit uation and regarding the Baltic states said only that strong Ger man counterattacks west of the Jelgava rail junction 30 miles southwest of Riga had been re Sensational Advance Made by Sky Troops in Descents Around Arnhem Nijmegen London powerful growing army of allied sky troops which vaulted across the Rhine in Holland battled forward Tuesday threat ening to break through into northern Germany AROUND THE of the Siegfried line The lower Rhine was knocked out as a German defense line The British 2nd army In a ground push linked with other airborne forces landed farther south in Holland and a front dis patch said it had seized Eindhoven 7th largest Dutch city 10 miles above the Belgian border The airborne army descended In the area of Nijmegen and Arn hem near the reich and astride the 2 lower branches of the Rhine as well as near Eindhoven supreme headquarters disclosed British ground forces were re pelled f 01 day the second successive villages and the adjacent islet of Ngarmoked were captured as the Japanese steadily retreated over the coral ridges honeycombed with defensive points in which some Japanese soldiers were which Lorient and St Nazaire are still under siege Brest is the 4th greatest French port and the nearest to the United States a geographical fact capital ized in the last war when 791000 American troops disembarked there Its position in Hitlers Atlantic wall was rendered untenable when Lt Gen George S Patton Jr severed the Brittany peninsula in his break through from Nor mandy Because it had extensive Ger man submarine pens and for months sheltered the German bat tleships Gniesenau and Scharn horst and the cruiser Prinz Eugen Brest became one of the heaviest bombed spots on earth even be fore the invasion chainedto their posts Infantrymenof thearmys 91st division filtering through a maze of vines and tropical underbrush occupied the northern half of lit tle Angaur island killing less than 100 of the elusive defenders on the way A large phosphate refinery important to Japans munitions industry the 2 of Saipan and a large railway yard were among their prizes Tokyo reported about 55 Light nings and Liberators Monday bombed Davao largest city in the ttAN CUT IN FEDERAL ROLLS Demobilization Is Directed by F R Washington Roosevelt Tuesday directed the government to prepare now for its own peace time demobilization indicating some of Washingtons sprawling war agencies will begin to fold up with the defeat of Ger many In a letter issued at the white house Mr Roosevelt ordered Budget Director Harold p Smith to plan now to liquidate war agencies and reconvert the gov ernment to peace Some steps along these lines may be taken when the lighting ends in Europe he said although he avoided predicting any date for the wars end The president ordered immedi ate reexamination of the staffing Red planes joined the battle in Latvia the communique contin ued and shot down 23 German aircraft Soviet ground forces killed more than 600 Germans and knocked out 54 tanks Moscow radio disclosed that Bal tic fleet planes hammered a large concentration of German ships in the Latvian port of Leipaja 123 miles southwest of Riga The broadcast said 3 German submarines and 3 transports total ing 12000 tons were sunk 2 large transports i arii floating dock aridport and military depots set The port of Leipaja was consid ered the logical evacuation point for the German forces now almost cut off by the soviet thrust which Berlin said carried to within 15 miles ofRiga in the Baldonearea German reports said the soviet line stretched from Jelgava through Baldone to Tartu in Es tonia near Lake Peipus with the main forces concentrated near Bauska 38 miles due i south ot Riga Madona 78 miles cast of Riga and around Tartu The Moscow communique an nounced that Gen Ivan Y Pet Nazi Defenses in Holland Falling Apart By VIRGIL PJCNKLEY Supreme Headquarters AEF Gen Lewis K Breretons airborne army TURNED THE NORTHERN END of the Siegfried line Tuesday in the Arnheim area of eastern Holland beyond the Rhine while other allied forces captured the Dutch transporthub of Eindhoven Front dispatches said the sky troopers and the British 2nd army were wheeling through Holland at a lively clip and ihe entire nazi defense system for the country ap peared to be falling apart With the Siegfried line turned if the airborne forces dropped in he Arnhem and Nijmegen areas can link up with the armored spearheads advancing north from lendhoven they will open a path or a fast dash into northwest Germany The northern end of the Sieg fried line is at Kleve 18 miles southeast of Arnhem Arnhem is on the north bank of the Rhine branch which flows to the North Sea through Rotterdam The land ing forces were operating north of Arnhem and thus established north of almost all the main water bar southern Philippines indicating the airfield on newly invaded Morotai island was already in use Fighters have made I4GO mile round trips to attack Davao but the fighter strip on Morotai little more than 300 miles fromthe tar get was one of the islands great est values The Nipponese made Z ineffec tive night raids on Morotai in their first counteraction against Gen Douglas Mac Arthurs inva sion Absence of Japanese air at Monty Gets Sweater He Lost in France in 40 Supreme Headquarters AEF Marshal Sir Bernard L Montgomery is wearing again an old brown sweater which he left behind with most of his kit in the hasty British withdrawal from Leuven in 1940 Monks found the kit and hid it When the British came back the monks presented itto Montgomery tacks on United around States forces the southern and duties of all agencies and said he soon as possibli plans for 1 The liquidation of war agencies and the reassignment of such permanent or continuing functions as they possess 2 The reduction of govern ment personnel to a peace foot ing 3 The simplification and ad the administrative peacetime require Peak Apparently Passed in Paralysis Cases New York of the in fantile paralysis epidemic appar ently has been passed for 1944 says Basil OConnor president of the National Foundation for In fantile Paralysis He reported 10 959 cases recorded in the nation to Sept 9 was the gr her for the period Philippines led Artemus Gates as sistant secretary of the navy for air to comment it is very con fusing why the Japs are not more He noted the total lack of fight from the Japanese air force during the 3 days he rode on a raiding carrier within sight of the Philippines These people he added definitely are on the run Adm Chester W Nimitz con ceded the Japanese have no room for optimism but pointed out that ahead of American forces lie tougher and more compact defenses the main bodies of the well trained Japanese army and the badly pummeled but still po tent imperial fleet From the navys expected for ward base at Palau Nimitz said his fleet will support MacArthurs invasion of the Philippines The Japanese have an estimated 40000 soldiers on Palau islands not yet invaded Tokyo asserted that all civilians had been evacu ated from Palau by a warship es cort convoy a doubtful claim Equallydoubtful and unsupport ed were Tokyobroad casts assert ing that 6500 Americans were aptation of structure to ments The civil service commission Monday reported federal payrolls stood at 2936602 employes at the start of this month 270502 of them Byrd inWashington But the committee on government rovs 4th Ukrainian army contin ued its drive toward CzechoSlov akia and extended the soviet lines along a 55 mile section of the bor der to a point below the Polish lown of Sanok More than 30 towns fell in the Russian advance through the east Beskid mountains where one spearhead was near Radoszyce Pass Another column drove 9 miles Monday to take Novotaniec 9 miles southwest of Sanok and only 11 miles from the Slovakian border while another occuped Kulaszne 10 miles from the bor der Petrov also sent a salient towarc the Cisna Pass on the eastern flank where it entered Ustryzki Dolni 21 miles southeast of Sanok A Bulgarian war communique broadcast by the Bulgarian hom service meantime disclosed that the Bulgarian troops were forced to withdraw from the town of Strumica in Yugoslavia north of the Greek Macedonian border The communique said however that the Bulgarians continued to hold out in Prilep west ot Trum ica across the Vardar river despite riers standing between the British army and northwest Germany The force in the NUmegen area 12 miles south of Arnhem com prised an intermediate link be tween the Eindhoven and Arnhem forces A quick junction will erect a great barrierbehind an unoffi ciallyestimated 7 0900 Germans in western Holland All available reports indicated that the allied forces were making excellent headway and firmly holding the key positions they had seized It appears that the German hope of fighting successfully for Holland or evacuating all troops from the Rotterdam and Amster dam coastal areas is fading fast United Press Correspondent Ron ald Clark reported from the 2nd army front Already the possibil ity appears of another gigantic bag closing around a big section of the Wehrmacht Strong British forces were mov ing swiftly northward across the irst series of water crossings vhere the Germans hoped to de end the approaches to the lower Rhine Clark reported ported already 12 miles north of Eindhoven or halfway to Nij megen and Arnhem The north ern forces near those towns had blocked out nazi reserves virtual ly cut off Rotterdam The Hague sfnd Amsterdam and more than held their own in a fight for key roads and bridges on both sides of the Rhine Arnhem oh the Neder Hyn L Rhine is 10 miles above Nijme gen which is 15 miles northwest of Kleve believed to be the upper anchor of the Siegfried line Berlin indicated new airborne landings above the Rhine delta in the area near Rotterdam Sterdam and the Hague This would pnt the battle front in the heart of Holland and well across the last great Dutch water barrier Three American armies mean while were battering slowly to ward the Rhine in Germany cut ting through defenses before that river which guard Cologne Stras bourg and Mulhouse The Germans were DESPER ATELY RESISTING all 3 Ameri can army offensives on a broad fronthurling in heavy counter attacks with tanks altillery and planes Rains also hampered the Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Americans in this region battles swirled Tuesday northand eastof Nancy a front dispatch said Many nazi forces in northern France excluding armored units had been f left virtually without motorized transport and had no choice but to fight or be overrun by Ameri i cans the dispatch added Progress of the parachute and gliderborne forces in Holland out 5 of their initial descent spots was j highly satisfactory headquarters said Men and supplies were poured in again Teusday for the third consecutive day Eindhoven a big communica tions center and Geldrop 7 miles to the east were swept up by the British 2nd army plunge up from Belgium They lie 10 miles inside Holland from the Belgian border The British already had struck on farther north coming to aid of al lied sky soldiers ousting the Ger mans from village after village and seizing strategic bridges and crossroads Berlin which Monday declared killed and 15 U S ships sunk at spending estimatedthe number of federal employes on Sept 13 at 3112965 About a million people worked for the government before the war Some officials have pre dicted with the closing of war pay checks will go to more than 1 500000 people for several years In his first specific order for demobilization plans within his own administration Mr Roosevelt wrote the budget director Upon the termination of hos tilities we must proceed with equal vigor to liquidate war agen cies and reconvert the govern ment to peace Some steps along these lines may be taken when the fighting ends in Europe The transition from war to peace should be carried forward rapidly but witha minimum of disorder and disruption Only careful planning can achieve this goal This is the time to do the plan ning although the in not over Most of the fierce German attacks Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGaiette carrier boy Palau Buy your War Bonds planning will probably haveto wait for execution until the Japs have there is no and I way of telling when that will Stamps from your GlobeGazette I happen But the plans should be carrier boy I ready Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Occasional showers Tuesday afternoon and Tuesday night Wednesday partly cloudy cooler Tuesday night and Wed nesday Iowa Occasional showers Tues day and in cast portion Tuesday night followed by partly cloudy Wednesday Cooler Tuesday night warmer in west portion Wednesday Minnesota Fair and cool Tuesday night Wednesday partly cloudy wanner north and west por tions IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 85 Minimum Monday night 60 At 8 a m Tuesday 60 Rain 44 inch YEAR AGO Maximum 70 Minimum 4 49 ALLIED GOALS IN WESTERN FRONT Open arrows indicate large German industrial centers for which allied troops are driving on the western European front Solid arrows indicate points where troops are attack ing Situation in Holland where airborne troops are active it was announced that elements of the British 2nd army have linked up with the 1st alliedairborne army   

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