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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 16, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COUP DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL It MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY AUGUST 16 1944 This Paper Consists at Two One NO 2Cf PUSH 8 MILES INTO SOUTH FRANCE Nazis Report Yankee Tanks Sweep On for Paris Trap Tightens By VIRGIL PINKLEY Supreme Headquarters AEF cornered rem nants of Germanys 7th army lashed out against encircling allied forces in a wild but apparently losing fight for life Wednesday night as Berlin reported that a new American armored column was ing on Paris and tha Seine to forge a great outer trap around the Normandy pocket The sudden emergence of the new American column in the roll ing wheat fields east of Paris poised a new threat to the riddled GerrrV divisions that had man aged to squeeze out of the Falaise Argentan gap at the eastern end of the allied trap Hounded from the air by swarms of lowflying allied attack planes that bombed and machinegunned every highway as far east as the Seine the German columns faced the greater menace of American tanks and infantrymen sweeping across their line of night Allied headquarters maintained silence on the enemy reports fol lowing the same blackout policy that prevailed during Lt Gen George S Pattons outflanking march on Argentan which sprang the Normandy trap Meanwhile the entire western half of the 7th army perimeter was collapsing under the hammer blows of converging allied armie swarming in for the kill from th north south and west All German traffic through the FalaiseArgentan corridor was re ported at a standstill Wednesday night because of the savage allied crossfire but nazi tanks and rifle men struck frenziedly at the clos ing wall of American and British forces in a lastminute effort to Normandy battle now in its an nihilation stage Headquarters sources believed that only a relatively email por tion of the 100000odd Germans originally caught in the allied net lad been able to escape despite ront reports that about half of Van Kluges 12 divisions had roke out in a wild dash through he Falaise Argentan corridor early Tuesday Gen Dwight D Eisenhower now in the field to direct the final stages of the battle of annihila tion poured more men guns and armor into the fight throwing the bulk of his forces against the western side of the pocket while the Canadian 1st army and Lt Gen George S Pattons American 3rd army hammered their ar mored wedges deeper into the eastern end The Canadians swung down more thana mile through a blaz ing screen of German 88milli meter guns and antitank weap ons capturing dominating heights from which their artillery could sweep virtually every road in the J Falaise area Simultaneously Pattons tanks and riflemen pushed slowly north and west of Argentan to within less than 6 miles of Falaise meet ing savage resistance from Ger man panzer units battling to hole open that side of the corridor At the opposite end of the trap British troops from the north anc escape Americansfrom the south slashet Thousands the defensive killed captured in the attempt perimeter in a series of fastroll and the German Transocean news agency admitted that the next few days or even hours might decide the fate of their surviving com rades Shaken by the incessant pound ing of allied planes and shellfire the broken remnants of Field Mar shal Gunther von Kluges 12 divis ions were splitting up into small in a frantic attempt to escape through the ring of guns and armor tightening around them Allies Get Firm Grip With Exceptionally Light Invasion Losses Rome U S 7th army reconstituted after its victorious campaign in Sicily has smashed through German coastal defenses and established itself firmly in southern France penetrating inland as far as 8 miles in some places allied headquarters announced Wednesday night Casualties in this newest invasion of Hitlers Europe were officially declared to be exceptionally light this resulting from perfect coordination of all arms and services Maj Gen Alexander 51 Patch of Guadalcanal fame was officially identified as the invasion commander American and French troops make up his army The original 7th army TT Geneva Hears Cannes and Nice Occupied INVASION huge armada comprising ships of all types forms in a port of southern Italy ready for the takeoff to the Mediterranean shore of France for the opening of a new front extending from Nice to Marseille More than 800 craft took part in invasion Bern reports to The Canadian 1st army fought its way into the outskirts of Fal aise narrowing the main eastern escape corridor to 6 miles or less and front reports indicated that the Germans were trying to break out over secondary roads and sneak through the hedgerows to safety Roving allied armored patrols raved along the perimeter of the pocket plugging the loopholes in their trap and slaughtering hun dreds of the fleeing enemy More than 4400 others were rounded up and shunted back to prisonerof war stockades during the past 30 hours some 3000 falling prisoner to the Canadians and 1400 to the ing thrusts that isolated a half dozen enemy units and pushed in the nazi lines as much as 3 miles The Americans captured JDom front La FerteMace and Ger drove into Yvrandes 3 miles sout of Tinchebray and farther to th east pushed beyond Ranes against strong enemy opposition Bitter fighting also was reporter around Argentan where th Americans still held only a part o the town although their armo already had penetrated well to the west and north Putangcs 10 miles west of Argentan also fell to the Americans in a quick lunge that lopped more than 5 miles off the southeastern corner of the en emy pocket TO the north British troops drove into Tinchebray and pushed eastward along the top of the pocket bypassing the strongly held village of Conde and crossing the Moire au river Air raiders struck hard at the embattled German garrison hold ing out in the citadel of St Malo on the north coast of Brittany The nazi DNB news agency said fell to the night after La Suisse of Geneva said Wed nesday the allies had occupied Cannes and Nice and that French partisans cooperating with 1000 Hied parachute troops were about to lake Marseille from vhich the Germans were moving outheastward toward Toulon East of Nice French advance guards were said to have passed he principality of Monaco on heir way to the Italian frontier Ventimiglia A dispatch from the Italian border said the Germans had or dered immediate evacuation of residents along the Ligurian coast line from Ventimiglia to the naval base of La Spczia 110 miles to the cast across the Gulf ot Genoa in the expectation of new allied landings A report from Chiasso to La Suisse said fascists believec southern France and northern Italy would soon be united in a single front and that Field Mar shal Gen Albert Kesseirings Gothic Line defenses eventually would be attacked from the rear It was suggested that this op eration would be launched by French forces landed on the Ligu rian coast after allied positions between Nice and Cannes were reinforced This expectation was supported by reports that strong land and naval forces are still in Corsica and Sardinia and by the con tinued intensive bombing of the coast and military facilities of Genoa built around the U S 2nd army corps which fought across Tunisia was headed during its Sicilian campaign by Lt Gen George S Patton Jr who now commands the U S 3rd army in western France Patch succeeded Pat ton as head of the 7th army last spring the township itself Americans Tuesday Americans United Press War Correspondent Robert C Miller with the Ameri can 3rd army near Argentan re ported in a delayed dispatch that the slaughter of Von Kluges army was in full swine Tuesday night Many of the Germans he said were tricked by their own com manders into believing that the way to the east was open It is when they try to find this gap that we either kill or cap ture them Miller reported His dispatch said the Germans were surrendering in small groups of 5 to 50 men Several thousand prisoners al ready have been bagged by the 3rd army Miller said along with great quantities of booty Meanwhile the German DNB news agency reported that rein forced American tank and me chanized infantry units had re sumed the eastern drive on Paris which was halted more thana week ago when Gen George S Patton Jr shifted the main weight of his attack northward to encircle the nazi 7th army Fierce fighting is in progress north of Chartres only 46 miles westsouthwest of Paris DNB said indicating that the Americans might be bypassing Chartres in a direct hrnst on the capital The London Evening News quoted reports from the continent as saying that distant roar of heavy artillery could be heard by the people of Paris Wednesday There was no confirmation pi the enemy report which said American tanks also were in the Nogent Le Rorrou and La Loupe areas just west of Chartres where they were being engaged by Ger man covering forces If true the DNB report would mean that the allied high com mand was striking out for Paris and the Seine river line without waiting for the completionof the I PARACHUTES DOT GROUND IN NEW FRENCH IN of American troops to land in Franco in the new invasion thrust the paratroop forces leave fields inland from the Mediterranean shore dotted with their collapsed parachutes This is the first photo to reach U S showing new landing Reveals Laval Leased Land in Portugal for Hideaway several hours of street fighting but both sides said the motley garrison inside the citadel still was putting up a furious battle There was no change in the sit uation at Brest or Lorient where American armored columns were pounding hard at isolated German garrisons trapped in those ports Allies Drop Surrender Leaflets for Germans Supreme Headquarters AEF planes showered down 2000005 safe conduct surrender leaflets upon Germans in the Fa laise escape gap headquarters an nounced Wednesday Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Mostly cloudy with scattered thundershowers Wed nesday night and Thursday Not much change in temperature Iowa Partly cloudy Wednesday afternoon and Wednesday night with scattered thunder showers in southeast portion Wednesday night Generally fair Thursday and Friday Cooler Wednesday night moderate temperature Thursday and warmer Friday Minnesota Generally fair Wednes day night and Thursday con tinued cool IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 84 Minimum Tuesday night 63 At 8 a m Wednesday 63 Rain Tuesday 40 inch YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Heinzen Believes Retain Wont Flee France Under Nazi Flag The author of the following dispatch was for many years United Press manager for France until he was arrested and interned by the Germans in Vichy in 1911 A correspondent in Faris contin uously from 1919 he is a recog nized authority on the French and France and is now on a lecture tour of the United States By RALPH HEINZEN United Press Staff Correspondent Indianapolis ful pincers the allies are applying to France promises to eliminate quickly the Vichy government anc this raises the question of what is to become of its 2 leading person Heinzen to Speak Here on Thursday Ralph Heinzen formerly United Press director for France writer of this dispatch will speak at a joint Chamber of Commerce GlobeGazette luncheon Thursday noon at Hotel Hanford The meet ing is open to women as well as men Reservations must be made by 10 a m Thursday at the Cham ber of Commerce telephone 146 landwriting on the wall A law artner of his soninlaw Count ene de Chambrun hadgone to ortugal and leased an estate in name for 3 years t is north of Lisbon near Cintra on he sea surrounded by high Avails Laval has close lies with Generalissimo Francisco Franco o Spain which may facilitate his passage across Spain into Portu gal As for Petain Of one thing I am almost cer will not flee France un der a nazi flag Lavals refusa to flee I am not so sure He may at the last moment prefer to cros into Germany rather than take chance of the Portugal hideawa proving inviolate After the French government moved to Bordeaux in Tune 1340 Petain told rne that he was determined never to leave continental France for North Africa The government 5 Vi D J r o i C h I 5 Henri Philippe Petain and Pierre Laval chief of staff Laval is known to have pre pared for the future Last March when the American diplomatic mission to Vichy passed through Lisbon on its way home from 15 months internment in Germany Its members learned that he had picked out a hideaway for him self In Portugal where hehopes to be safe from the wrath of French patriots I Even then he had read the then was debating whether to flee to North Africa and continue he war My place is right here in Trance with the French people he said then I am equally deter mined not to return to Paris until the Germans have evacuated the apital It is my opinion that the French government must not take refuge under any foreign flag His feeling then would seem to apply now And he may depend on his years and the veneration in which the French people once held him as the hero of Verdun to preserve him from the conse quences of his misrule GETS 2 TELEGRAMS Manhattan Kans mes senger delivered 2 telegrams to Mrs Ollie Reed The first one she opened told of the death of her son Lt Olli Reed Jr in Italy July 6 The second advised her that her husband Col Ollie Reed was killed in action in France July 30 SPECULATE ON NEW LANDINGS Nazis Turks Look for Move Into Yugoslavia London and neu tral sources speculated Wednesday on the possibility of another al lied landing in southern Europe probably in Yugoslavia Radio Ankara said a landing was expected in the Adriatic which includes Albania as well as Yugoslavia while a Berlin dis patch in the Stockholm newspaper Tidningen said the allies probably would open a 5th front soon in Dalmalia Allied sources declined to com ment on the reports but it was recalled that Prime Minister Churchill conferred with Mar shal Tito commander of the Yugo slav partisan army arid Dr Ivan Subasitch prime minister of last Saturday and Sunday in Italy The 3 leaders discussed both military and political questions in a spirit of entire frankness a British communique said at the time and added that the conver sations would continue Titos army comprising 350000 or more guerrillas already holds several large sections of Yugo slavia and on many occasions lias demonstrated its ability to seize beachheads on the Dalmatian coast on which an allied invasion army could be put asjiore The combined partisan and al lied armies it was believed easily could rout the 10 to 11 German divisions stationed in Yugoslavia and then strike into the German rear in Hungary and Romania and ultimately southern Ger many Railroad President Is Behind Schedule Reason Train Late Chicago Trains run late in war times even for railroad pres idents Newspapermen and photograph ers were at the Ln Salle street sta tion awaiting arrival of the new president of the New York Cen tral railroad Gustavc Metzman Those things will happen these days explained Metzman as he alighted from the train bchim schedule Small Boy Insists to Police That His Name Is Just Butch Boston and onehalf year old Harold Anthony Wynot was lost and when police asked iim his name he told they didnt understand Butch he said clearly The policemen explained they needed the rest of the name Butch isnt enough they said Wynot the little fellow ex claimed This continued through a num ber of ice cream cones until the youngsters father arrived anc explained about the name Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy French elements of the 7th are commanded by Maj Gen Jean DC Liittre De Tassigny who es apcd prison at Ttiom after being entenced by a Vichy court to a J year term for organizing armed osistance to the nazi invasion outhern France British and American airborne roops vaulting behind the lines v c r c credited officially with enemy reinforcements Great fleets of tJ S troop carriers winged supplies and reinforce ments by glider and parachute in to the airborne bridgehead Wed nesday German resistance generally continued relatively weak Assault forces fought on through the night after overrunning the first beach obstacles At one point however heavy German opposition prevented landing craft froirCbeaching was learned American and French forces are still streaming ashore on the beachheads between Toulon and Cannes Casualties arc exceptionally light it was officially announced The assault was facilitated throughout by a superior air bombardment and was supported by naval gunfire said by observ ers lo be heavier and more ef fective than drums any previous operation in the Mediterranean theater a headquarters an nouncement said Airborne American and British troops together with the preD day bombing of roads railroads and bridges have successfully blocked enemy reinforcements The airborne units arc moving on predetermined objectives The invasion commander was quoted as commending both French and American troops in he seaborne operations for the nggressiveness displayed by both assault and followup units The landings were ecnerally htly opposed but heavy Gei man fire blocked off sea landing craft at one point it was learned This setback was reported by Tech SK Richard T Wright of Arlington Va a marine combat correspondent He said the Ger man fire it this point which was not identified hart prevented troops from debarking Allied headquarters soid the op erations were proceeding accord ing to plan No comment was of fered upon broadcast German ac counts of the action nor was a re MEDITERRA Buy your War Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGaicttc carrier boy INVASION STRIKES SOUTHERN a 100mile stretch of beach between Nice and Marseille an armada of more than 800 ships flying various allied flags landed large forces of American British and French troops as a 3rd front on the European con tinent was opened The overall invasion force which came from the Mediterranean thea ter of war reached its target without detection or interference   

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