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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, June 23, 1944 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 23, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL b AMdited Pica msa United Prac Full Wm Centl MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY JUNE 23 1944 Ibis Piper CooifeUi of Two NO ttt YANKS TAKE PEAK NEAR CHERBOURG Nazis Claim Russians Launch Eastern Drive SAY MOVE IS MADE ON BROAD LINE Report Heavy Tank and Plane Support for Red Offensive BULLETIN London German radio commentator Ernst Von Hammer said Friday night that the Rus sians were attacking alone a front of more than 100 miles in White Russia and had made a breach in German tines southeast of Vitebsk The Russians were driving to break through along the Dvina river into the Baltic states he de clared London Germans an nounced Friday that the red army striking on the 3rd anniversary of Hitlers surprise invasion of Rus sia had launched its longawaited summer offensive on the eastern front While Moscow had not as yet confirmed the opening of the drive the German high command and official Berlin broadcasts de clared the Soviets moved forward Thursday on a broad front north of the Pripet the most direct road from Moscow to Berlin and an assault which may be coordinated with allied advances in France and Italy The Germans said a large scale soviet offensive was set in motion from south of Mogilev to north of Vitebsk with heavy tank and plane support while Moscow announced that triple Russian spearheads drove deeper against the Finns north of Lake Onezh skoe Onega and up the Aunns isthmus as well as along the northern reaches of the Karelian isthmus The Berlin communique said the initial thrusts were parried bul bitter fighting is still going on on either side of Vitebsk The assault was accompaniec by local attacks northwest of Tarnopol toward Lwow in south ern Poland below the Pripe marshes the report added The first German report was made by Ernst von Hammer chief military correspondent for Internatinal Information bureau a propaganda agency His account was followed by similar accounts by DNB official new agency Transocean another news agency and by the high command While making the usual claim that the Russian gains were scaiei off promptly von Hammer said that the red army was using ar tillery and tanks on a grand scale There was no confirmation from Russian sources concerning th reported offensive and Londoi military men adopted a wait and see attitude Three ciuys after tin allied landings in Normandy thi Germans announced the opening of a new soviet drive which die not materialize However in the past German reports of Russian drives almos always have preceded those from Moscow which is inclined to wai for substantial results before put ting out communiques An offensive developing alon the MogilevVitebsk line could b aimed almost straight west Berlin southwest at about 420 miles away or north west to lop off the Baltic state by cutting 250 miles to Riga It is certain that the Russian are employing only a small per centagc of their rested and re equipped forces against Finland and that the red army is in a po sltion o strike anywhere i chooses along the front from h Black sea to the Baltic Transocean said that a big at tack with very strong forces was made by the Russians on the 3rd anniversary of the war along a front of about 95 miles from just south of Mogilev to just north of Vitebsk and that fierce fighting continues there It also said reconnaissance in dicated the lull likely would be broken soon on the north end the eastern front but it did not specify where There was a possibility that the operations reported by the Ger mans merely were masking at tacks for a main Russian blow which would fall elsewhere later It seemed likely the Russians were satisfied that the Finnish dean up was in hand and were moving into the main battle in coordination with the allies SIB6RIA KAMCHATKA SAKHALIN f PARAMUSHIRO Pacific Ocean MANCHURIA VladivottoiT WAKE MARSHALL IS JAVA AUSTRALIA 1000 fTAIUIi MUll WHERE FORCES with battleship sym bols in area between Philippines and Marianas indicates where American aviators sunk or damaged 14 Japanese ships Arrow from flag points to Saipan island invasion of which by U S forces brought Jap fleet from hiding Other flags indicate American and Japanese holdings f X if if if S U S Invasion Force Lashes Ahead in Saipan Isle Drive By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS U S Pacific Fleet Headquarters Pearl thousan Japanese apparently abandoned to their death by a routed Nippones fleet were hit high and low Friday on Saipan by a Yank invasio army which now outnumbers foe Sensing almost certain victory the distant Marianas as the aftermath of a onesided sea tri umph the reinforced Yanks scaled the heights and probed the flat lands of that island gateway to Japan China and the Philippines The scales were tipped heavily in favor of the United States Mon day by task force 58 a newly disclosed fast and mighty armada with perhaps 20 of the nearly 100 U S carriers in action against Japan Saipans potential naval support was sent scurrying between Luzon and Formosa into the far China sea by carrier planes of this spec ialized group which sank one Japanese carrier heavily hit 3 others and damaged a battleship and cruiser In all 4 enemy ships definitely were sunk and 10 others hard hit Task force 58 which navy offi cials in Washington said has been assigned the entire Pacific ocean to the gales of Japan as its stamp ing ground thus paved the way for a steppedup drive on Saioan itself Thursday night Adm Chester W Nimitz reported that the invasion of that island 1500 miles from Tokyo but 3800 miles from Pearl Harbor was going well Supported by planes operating off captured Aslito airdrome and outrunning the Nipponese on the ground the Tanks drove ahead more than a mile on the east side of the island at illagicienne bay In the center they were scal ing 1540 foot Mount Tapotchau In the southeast tip they had wiped out half of an unspecified total of trapped Japanese and seized 50foot Mount Nafutan Friday Tokyo conceded in a dis patch heard over the Goman ra dio that the Yanks are pouring ashore along with heavy guns on Saipan Assessing Mondays attack far to the west of Saipan on the Jap anese fleet Navy Secretary For restal said in Washington Our fleet did a magnificent job bul the navy is not going to be satis fied until the Japanese fleet is wiped out He said the Japanese never came very far to the eastward and we were able to send home but one air attack at very Ions range from our carriers just be fore The dynamite punch of the task force obviously was a painful sur prise for the Japanese whose car rier planes at a cost of 353 super ficially damaged 2 U S carriers and a battleship Sunday The timing of this blow more than a week after the U S 5th fleet appeared off the Marianas far from home base suggested the Japs had waited for an apportun moment and had not foreseen 58 was held in reserve South of the western Paciti battle area Gen Douglas Mac Arthur annuounced Friday tha an enemy merchantman in a 15 ship convoy near Palau has bee sunk by a Liberator Palau is naval and air base which Mac Arthurs air arm has been as signed to keep from figuring i the Saipan operation REPORT DAMAGE IN MINNESOTA 10 Albert Lea Planes Struck by Hailstorm By UNITED PRESS At lenst 2 persons were known to have been injured n number of farm buildings were destroyed or damaged and 10 airplanes were damaged on the ground when a storm swept through southeastern Minnesota Thursday night Wind hail and rain were re ported from various sectors of the storm area which apparently ex tended from Ldbeville and North field south to Albert LeaWells and Ithaca Injured were Lawrence Elstad about 35 who received a cut eye and Hannah Olson who suffered cuts and bruises Both were from the Lakeville area and were treated by a Lakeville physician Elstad will receive additional treatment in St Paul Friday Barns on the Richard Arenson Joseph Simmon and Charles Dunn farms in the Lakeville area were reported to have been leveled by the storm which struck about 3 DAY SESSION S MAPPED BY CHIEFS IN GOP Managers Counting Heavily on Harmony in Party for Fast Work By C WILSON Chicago na ional convention managers Friday inveiled a streamlined program o complete their business in 3 lays and bring the 1944 GOP residential candidate to the plat orm on the evening of June 28 o accept his nomination The onvention meets at a m CWT Monday The convention managers are betting heavily on party harmony vhich will avoid prolonged plat orm disputes or reputed ballot in to nominate the ticket Draft Dewey advocates claim heir man fits that program and on the first ballot will become the 944 republican presidential can didate but neither the headquar ers of Gov Thomas E Dewey of Jew York or Gov John W Sricker of Ohio makes any claims as to the ballot on vhich their man will win nor even how many delegates already are assured for him But individ ial campaigners are talking free y Brickers backers say they are confident now that Dewey can be leld for 2 ballots and that if he ails to come up with a majority on that 2nd roll call he is stopped Few however dispute that Dewey will be front runner on ballot No 1 The Bricker candidacy suf fered a briital blow in publica tion of a nationally known politi cal poll which reported Devey the overwhelming choice of re publican rank and file voters in Ne wEngland and the midAtlanti states The unquestionably will have considerable effect on the delegates band wagon stincts But claims and counterclaims are a nickel a dozen As of now Dewey apparently has a big mar gin of support which some of those who opose the New Yorker contend he cannot hold beyond a couple of ballots They are recalling the 1940 re publican national convention when Wendell L Willkie came from be hind to win on the 6th ballot Willkie does not figure in this convention as a candidate and he has not been invited to lend a hand with the platform nor to make a speech The republicans in charge here do not want any more of Willkie ever But if bal loting were prolonged this con vention might nominate almost anyone except Willkie or Herbert C Hoover the partys elder states man First definite indication wheth er Dewey can win in one ballot may come Monday when the 50 vote California delegation arrives and caucuses to decide upon its candidate It is headed by Gov Earl Warren of California who will enjoy a unique position as an active campaigner against his GERMAN WRECKAGE LITTERS CHERBOURG and wrecked Ger man motorized equipment litters a road on which the nazis fled the Cherbourg peninsula before the invading allies At right an American soldier in a jeep holds a captured Ger man flag Associated Press wirephoto via signal corps radio engraving by Kayenay states II its whopping 50 votes go to Dewey the show is over In 1940 Dewey had a head start but could not hold it Here is the roll call record of that republican national convention Candate 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Dewey 360 338 315 250 57 Taft 189 203 212 254 377 Willkie 105 171 259 306 429 Willkie was nominated on the 6th ballot in which Dewey got not single vote The record shows the fundamental strength of Sen Robert A Taft Ohio who is here this year only as a delegate and chairman of the resolutions com mittee A lot of people around this convention would like to see Taft and ifballoting were prolonged his chances would be good The 3day convention schedule assigns both Monday sessions to argely routine business and the vennig address of Warren as emporary chairman The resolu tions committee is scheduled to report the platform Tuesday morning Mr Hoover and Rep lare Booth Luce republican Conn the lady last speak Tues day night And if all goes well he delegates will begin balloting for a presidential candidate Wed nesday morning Bricker and Taft are here and Deweys backers announced he would come here to accept the nomination Heavier Robot Bombs Sent Against England by Nazis By BRUCE W ItlTJNN London barrage of new and heavier robot bombs openec ic 2nd week of the German aerial offensive on southern Englant own nomination for vice presi dent If he campaigns hard enough he may escape it Warrens advice to his delega tion as it started east Wednesday was to make a caucus decision on a candidate and to vote that se lection on the first ballot without any bargaining or jockeying The delegation is bound by a rule which commits all 50 votes to any candidate who can win support of twothirds the delegates Cali fornia is fourth in the roll of p m Further building damage was reported in the Hazlewood district in Rice county A severe hailstorm hit the out skirts of Albert Lea damaging 10 aircraft both civilian and navy planes which were on the ground at the time Damage to the planes was estimated at The storm also struck at Ithaca and Wells and crop damage was reported to be considerable in that area Heavy damage to the pea crop was reported in some sectors Many trees were down and water was reported to have washed shoulders from the pavement on highway 28 between Farmington and Randolph Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy 8 Persons Killed by Tornado in Wisconsin 100 Buildings Leveled PLalteville Wis tornado struck 2 border counties in Wis consin and Illinois Thursday night killed at least 8 persons injured an unestimated number and de stroyed more than a dozen homes in Belmonf Wis Damage to property was esti mated at thousands of dollars sith estimates or more than 100 homes and farm buildings leveled Sheriff Homer L Curry of La fayette county Wis said at leas 6 persons were killed in the coun ty Two other persons were killed when the tornado struck Stephen son county III A Wisconsin home guard com pany was dispatched to the strick en area at Belmont and Darling ton DIE FOR is not pretty in the jungles or anywhere else Here you see litterbearers too often the unsung heroes gently loading their dead comrades for transportation to the rear Look well at this picture and remember it when you are asked to buv an EXTRA war bond during the 5th war loan SHELBY COUNTY LEADS IN IOWA Franklin County 45 of War Bond Quota Des Moines count vas leading the other 98 countic of the state with 80 per cent of i war loon campaign quota sub cribed on the basis of reports a of June 21 the state war finant committee reported Friday Shelby has a goal ot S908 000 tilat of which is in E bonds exjncuate riday but Home Secretary Herbert Morrison dismissed Hitler1 lying torpedoes us an eapon of terror that is being i rought under control by secret efensive measures Throughout Thursday night a poradic stream of pilotless bomb rs slipped through the coastal creen of fighters and antiaircraft atleries to spread death and de tructioninland andihe attacks ontinued on through the day Observers reported that the termans were sprinkling a mim er of larger and faster projectiles nto their robot fleets apparently arrying a heavier explosive harge The new bombs were said o have a larger wing span and to resemble more closely a standard ircraft but allied fighters still vere able to overtake and destroy many of them Morrison who made the first of icial disclosure of the enemys new weapon in commons last veek returned to the house Fri day to report that the weekold error offensive has caused little damage of national importance nnd has only slightly impaired Hiblic services in southern Eng and The home secretary said the ro bot bombs explode with the effect of a 2000pound blockbuster He derided the exaggerated Ger man claims of crippling damage nflicted by the pilotless planes and asserted that fewer people were killed in the first 5 nights of this offensive than in the 5 nights of the little blitz staged by pilot ed nazi bombers in midFebruary As for the Berlin radio claim hat London had been evacuated because ot the offensive Morrison said Well here we arc assembled in parliament One curious effect of the robot campaign was a sharp decline in Britains dairy production Dairy farmers in southern England re ported that their cows which ig nored previous bombing raids ant appeared impervious to the sound of gunfire were terrified by the robot bombs At the first sound of the flying torpedoes the cows were said to leap to their feet and begin racing crazily around their pasture Th result has been a drop of severa pounds in the average milk yield LONG SIEGE OF CITY BELIEVED TO BE UNLIKELY Defenses Are Fairly Formidable But Speedy Fall Is Expected Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force Gen Omar N Bradleys finely tuned American assault troops have tormed over one of the 3 forti ied peaks dominating Cherbourgs harbor supreme head luarters announced Friday and peedy fall of the city is expected Describing Cherbourgs de enses as fairly formidable headquarters announcement said a prolonged siege is unlikely now Attacking with a storm of ar illery fire and a huge array oE nstruments of destruction the Americans captured a height at rourlaville 1 mile from the sea ind one mile from Cherbourg on he southeast The Germans had been reduced to machineguns small arms and light artillery in lefending their pillboxes and pre pared defenses Americans nnd Germans were so closely interlocked in the grim battle that allied air forces were unable to give the close battle front the support that marked the opening ot the allout attack Thursday British and American planes concentrated on quarantining the battle area hitting rail and road communications in a semi circle 100 miles deep in France as the Americans clcftnped a vise on Cherbourg and smashed at the other 2 remaining hilltop bastions These were at Nouainville miles southwest of the port and 3 miles from the coast and atLa Mare A Conards miles direct ly to thfc south of the city Three German divisions mixed with German naval units and a defense garrison were believed caught in the American clamp The Germans apparently had withdrawn completely from the eastern tip of the peninsuls in or der to concentrate on defense of Cherbourg A Canadian press correspondent 1 that the Germans may acuated Caen at the east ind the report showed n subscrip ion of 5544638 including n E bonds The slates quota is 5202000000 ncluding in E bonds reports showed sales ot 000000 of which 517800000 was n E bonds Those counties which have sold more than onethird of their quota were Hamilton 55 per cent Louisa and Dickinson 53 Ida 40 Sioux and Franklin each 45 Clay 43 Greene 41 Poweshiek Mit chell and Davis each 4 Lyon 38 Appanoose 35 Clarke and Mar shall 34 Davis county was leading in the sales of E bonds having reached 51 per cent of its quota Lyon was next with 44 and Hamilton 3rd with 30 ern end of the allied line in Nor mandy and dispersed their forces outside the city because of the ter rific bombings to which the long contested town had been sub jected There was no confirmation at supreme headquarters of a Ger man radio report that new allied airborne landings had been made at Gavray east of Granville on the peninsulas west coast 60 miles below Cherbourg The Germans were making a desperate bid to hold the stra tegic port as long as possible Everywhere fierce resistance was encountered and a particularly vicious battle was being fought for the big airfield at 5 miles east of the Buy War Savinjis Konds and Stamps from your GlobcGazelic carrier boy control ot Maupertus city Inside the besieged port the German garrison stood up stub bornly under Thursdays 1000 planc assault on the forts and pillboxes comprising the citys de Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Friday night Sunday and Monday Cooler and less humid Friday after noon and Friday night Fresh winds diminishing Friday night Iowa Fair through Saturday with moderate winds General cool ing decreasing humidity through Saturday Minnesota Partly cloudy Friday night and Saturday Cooler Fri day night and in north portion and extreme southeast portion Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 86 Minimum Thursday night 67 At 8 a m Friday Rain YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 11 69 inch B6 66 BATTLE FOR CHERBOURG show American drives in the Cherbourg area where U S troops were re ported to be thrusting toward the waterfront of the port city   

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