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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 2, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME y 9 6CPARTUCNT Or HISTORY AND ARCHIVE OtS KOINES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOLL icittod Pn I United Fma Full LtaKd a COOT MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY JUNE 2 1941 This Paper Consbti ot Two One NO Heaviest US PRODUCED Blow on French Coast TRANSTONIA HUNGARY ALSO ARE ASSAULTED Mediterranean Strikes Support Reds Massing on Carpathian Slopes London to 1500 Ameri can heavy bombers and fighters struck the heaviest single blow yet at the French invasion coast Fri day and another great armada of 500 to 750 4engined planes from Italy bombed 5 railway yards in Hungary and Transylvania Mediterranean air force head quarters reported good results In the assaults upon Miskolc Szol nok and Szeged in eastern Hun gard and upon Cluj and Simeria in Transylvania the mountainous Romanian province which Ger many ceded partially to Hungary in 1340 The Mediterranean strikes were in direct tactical support of the Will Channel Male Labor Through U S Job Service to Posts of Greatest Urgency Washington new controls over the nations dwind ling supply of male workers were ordered Friday by the war man power commission to be placed in effect by July l They provide that virtually every jobseeking man in America United States employment Russian armies massing on the Carpathian slopes German troops and material had been funneled to the front over lines passing through the 5 tangled yards The Britainbased planes struck the PasDeCalais department of France and reported no sign German fighter opposition Perhaps 3000 tons of explosives were unloosed on the French for tifications with he bombers able to carry maximum loads due to the short trip involved Before dawn allied flyers struck over 3000 miles of airways from for assignment to the war plant where he is most needed regard less of where that plant may be located Employers on the other hand will be permitted to hire only those men referred to them by the USES The successful conduct of the war now requires the channeling of all available male labor in the nation to jobs of greatest war production urgency and the re tention of such labor in those jobs War Manpower Commis sioner Paul V McXutt declared in announcing the new program It extends on a nationwide basis the WMCs voluntary pro gram already in effect in about a dozen areas of critical labor shortage We propose McNutt declared to accomplish the channeling by a system of priority referral ef fective throughout the nation but varying among communities by such adaptations as may be found desirable Farm workers are not restricted nor are businesses with 8 or less employes McNutt said the program would make it possible for a worker anywhere in the country to take his most useful place on the in dustrial firing line adding This is just as important asit is for us to get our soldiers on to the firing line when and where ihere is undue hardship special emergency circumstances or other 175000 PLANES IN 3 YEARSFR Craft Going to Alliei at Rate of 338 Each Week Washington resident Roosevelt said Friday the United States has produced more than 175000 airplanes in about 3 years In the first 91 days of this year the president said 4400 planes were sent to our allies from the United an average of Allies Take Velletri Valmontone as Rome Defense Line Begins to Crumble cause McNult stressed that every WMC area in the country will have con siderable latitude in determining detailed application of the plan In order to utilize all the help we can get other agencies will be approved by the area USES of fices for clearing and referring workers These will include union hiring halls colleges and univer sities and other normal employ ment channels While the WMC instructs each regional manpower director to put the plan into effect by July 1 McNutt said it could be adopted earlier by any area wishing to do Aid to Industries He said one of the principa difficulties in recruiting men for war jobs and retaining them is over optimism with respect to an early ending of the causing workers to look for peace time employment this a not nearly over and such senti ment is positively dangerous t the war effort Production needs and manpowe demands may be specific plants or Scandinavia to France and from they are needed Hungary to Crete The PasdeCalais section prob ably the most intensively bombed area in the world for its size is a scant 25 miles across the channel from England where Gen Eisen howers invasions armies massed andeager The department 90 milesintothe French sirrSfiibr and along 35 miles of the coast and contains such familiar points asCalais the World war I of Boulogne the resort Le Touquet and Cape Griz Nez terminal for channel swims RAF heavy bombers concentrat ed on southwest French rail yards at Saumur 150 miles from Paris and the French coast Thursday night Mediterranean forces attacked Hungarian yards 30 miles east of Budapest at Szol nok Mosquitos bombed a target in Denmark and the Germans re ported an air attack which dam aged a convoy off the west Nor wegian coast Middle east bombers attacked ports on the big Greek island of Crete Enemy waters were mined The daylight bombers left con verging trails of vapor over the 20mile channel and shortly after wards a rumble of explosions echoed back to England A Cairo communique said an important German convoy was attacked in the central Aegean Sea north of Crete Thursday and that 4 ships were left burning and others were damaged Two de stroyers among the 8 escort ves sels were declared damaged Ten aircraft were lost in the attacks Thursday and during the last 2 weeks In offensive sweeps into France and Germany Thursday evening RAF and RCAF fighters shot down 3 German planes while 3 planes in the attacking force were trhayepeen most disturjjed by t Thejwafi easing up areas due n Iowa Is Seen Des Moines D Jaskell state war manpower di ector expressed belief Friday hat the new national manpower controls would aid materially in providing needed male workers or Iowas essential industries but would not mean a major change n conditions which prevail in his state He estimated that those con cerns which are producing food supplies and equipment used by the armed forces are today in need of 8000 workers of whom 6000 should be men Since the first fo the year we have experienced a draft of work ers from essential to less essen tial occupations on the popular assumption that the war is al most over Haskell said It is apparent that people have been program should 338 planes a week In making public the report from the foreign economic administra tion Mr Roosevelt recalled that some doubting Thomases scoffed when he told congress before the war that the administrations goal was to produce 50000 planes a year The goal he said has been ex ceeded tremendously Between March 11 1941 when the lendlease act was passed and April 1 this year more than 33 0000 planes have been sent to the fighting forces of the other united nations Mr Roosevelt said the allies paid cash for 7000 of the planes and the remainder were sent under lendlease President Roosevelt said the question of an Americanbuilt oil pipe line in the Mediterranean area is in the iffy stage and added no one knows whether there will be a pipeline Secretary of the Interior Ickes announced last winter that the United Stales would construct a pipeline in the near east to trans port oil from an oil concession owned by an American company The president said Friday that not oniy does no one know if there will be a pipeline but no one can lost The latest blows against the cutbacks but workers who ma be released in such situations ar sorely needed in other plants o other areas where war production schedules are being increased Ex perience in the past has shown that this easing of manpower docs not result in the filling of all labor demands in critical war indus tries While some sources saw the ex panded program as a move neces sary because of the lack of na tional service legislation McNutt said it had no relation to any legislation The WMC national management labor policy commit tee has reaffirmed its conviction he added that the nations man power needs can best be met un der programs voluntarily devel oped and adopted explained that while the program is on a voluntary basis sanctions can be imposed in cases of noncompliance He said work ers who refuse to cooperate would find it difficult without a clearance slip to get a job while do not participate will not have workers referred to them Industries most in need of strong male labor at present McNutt asserted are foundries and forge shops rubber and tire repair logging Similar acute production ship and lumbering continent were a continuation of an allied aerial offensive which already was declared to have se verely restricted certain German military movements behind the in vasion front In a statement Thursday night reviewing the results of allies battle of communications the British air ministry gave this pic ture of the enemys transportation position of bridges has severely restricted military move ments which involve the crossing oE the Seine river within 100 miles of the coast of the railroad system in occupied countries has driven the Germans to roads where additional bridges are out and in some places traffic jams extend for miles strategic bombings doubtless have wiped out many nazi factories which the Germans need to produce motor vehicles general the capacity or the enemy to repair blasted rail lines has been swamped Heavy British assaults on French rail centers seem to haveforced the Germans to abandon their pain of trying to get all yards in full working order again and the en emy now appears to be concen trating instead on repairing only through lines Buy War Savings Bonds and shortages he added are develop ing in such fields as textile man ufacturing coal mining and elec tronic equipment To stiffen further the voluntary manpower system McNutt di rected that in the 184 group 1 and 2 areas of serious labor shortage there should be established 1 Employment ceiling programs fixing the total number of men who may be employed in specific establishments These programs already exist in about 25 of the areas 2 Manpower priority commit tees to decide which industries in their respective areas are entitled to worker priorities About 35 areas have such committees The broadened program pro vides that uses offices will ex pose applicants to jobs available in the order of their relative im portance to the war effort To the greatest degree consist ent with the war effort workers shall be given the maximum pos sible freedom of choice as to thi jobs they accept McNutt said Employers also shall be given the maximum possible freedom o choice as to the workers the employ In some areas he continued th choice will be wider than ir others depending upon the strin gcncy of the labor situation Under the plan a worker DM be referred to ether than an sentUl job only if he is Mt needed place a decided check upon this movement by tending to hold labor in essential war jobs Under the newregulations be ginning July 1 ali men hired will have to be channeled through the U S employment service Actually this does not involve a major change from the condi ion that prevails now in Iowa since for the past year all work ers employed in essential industry lave had to be referred through USES offices he emphasized Priority referrals in use for some time in most Iowa manpow er areasv will become statewide under the new controls The 3rd regulation establish ment of employment ceilings will be effective only in group one and group 2 areas Iowa has 4 areas in those classifications Davenport and Clinton in group one and Newton and Cedar Rapids in group 2 Placement of cities in the group areas depends upon the availabil ity of manpower in the cities Iowa follows the national pat tern in that its foundries almost without exception are behind schedule because of the lack of manpower Haskell said These foundries are producing vital war products Haskell said also hat between j volvcd ow and Oct 1 Iowa canning fac ories will need 10000 workers to roccss this years food crop A urther shortage of male labor Is ntieipated next fall when high chopl boys who have signed up o fill some of the gaps in in ustrial production lines during the summer return to school Iowa has more areas with criti al or near critical labor short ges than any other state in this egion the WMC state director aid This situation has been brought about by the huge in rease in industrial labor plus se eclive service withdrawals and outmigration of workers The situation has been solved partly by greater utilization of vomen but there are many jobs eyond a womans strength Has kell said say who will pay for it President Roosevelt smiled and said a reporter was about to send him to a dictionary when the newsman asked the chief execu tive if he regarded the words independence and integrity as being synonymous with the word sovereignty A discussion came up at the presidents news conference in a rEporterJsisttempt todeyelop Mr Roosevelts statement of last week that nothing in our postwar planning would hamper the inde pendence and integrity of the United States The reporter asked him if that meant sovereignty Mr Roosevelt said he djdnt get the point and that he would have to do a lot of thinking and go to the dictionary lie added that he still is as much in favor of the sovereignty of the United States as he ever had been and as much as the reporter was President Roosevelt said the government is considering the possibility of using unneeded army camps to house foreign ref ugees in this country for the du ration of the war When he said earlier this week that he favored the idea of free ports as temporary havens for refugees the president explained to his news conference Friday he did not mean all ot the refugees should come to this country or all go to other countries that the rule of common sense would apply He said for example that he thought it would not be common sense to bring refugees over a long ocean haul to this country when they could be placed in other countries more conveniently j and with less transportation in ii 26 REASONS WHY NAZIS FEAR A of bombs is the weather forecast foi France as this B26 Marauder medium bomber of the U S army 9th air force unloads 26 100pounders over a nazi installation in that occupied country The bombs are seen h midair just after release Army air force photo 25 on Streets Are Felled By New York gang of 25 men repairing a united nations freighter at a Brooklyn pier were overcome Friday in the unven tilated hold as 195 persons crammed hospitals after being stricken by chlorine gas fumes which fected an estimated persons Thursday The accidents were not related Three men fainted and the rest of the repair crew became ill and dizzy as the oxygen supply in the ships hold was deleted Those conscious were assisted up the hatchway to air Rescuers hoisted the remaining 3 by ropes to the deck of the ship Ten were re moved to local hospitals and 15 recovered at the scene A police alarm brought police Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy for an essential job hi the if he is net adaptable U an es sential MteMe Ike area Rule WLB Orders Not Reviewable by Courts Washington The United States court of appeals for the Dis trict of Columbia ruled Friday that orders of the war labor board are not reviewable by the court The ruling was on an appea brought by the employers of car riers and individuals who repre sent about 300 trucking companie engaged in transporting freight in Boston and throughout New Eng land KILLED IN FALL Minneapolis C Mil chell was killed Thursday night i a fall from the east end of Ceda avenue bridge The coroners of fice reported that he fell upon drj ground in an apparent suicide at tempt to jump into the river REDS ATTACK N ROMANIA Beat Off 3 Days of Vicious Nazi Assaults Moscow The red army ounterattacked vigorously north f lasi Friday in a bid to regain he initiative on the Romanian ront after destroying 166 tanks and 212 planes in beating off 3 days of ferocious German assaults Though the axis offensive still was continuing the Soviets began a series of successful counter attacks Thursday a supplement to the Russian midnight communique said German and Romanian thrusts at the Russian line broke Thurs day under the massed fire of sovie artillery rnortar and machinegun batteries Eight hundred enemy troops were killed and 17 tanks and 5 armored transports knocked out in 3 futile attacks on one sec tor MACARTHITR LOOKS AHEAD Hollywood R e d1 Barry cowboy screen star wh returned to the screen capital aft er a tour of the southwest Pacifi with a camp show said Friday tha Gen Douglas MacArthur alread had booked entertainment from Hollywood for the first troops t reenter Manila the capital of th Philippines Barry tourned th war area with Actors Gary Coope and John Wayne and fire rescue squads and am bulances from most of Brooklyns hospitals still apprehensive ns a result of the freak accident which hit Brooklyns shopping district Thursday when greenishyellow fumes poured from a 220poune steel cylinder of chlorine No fatalities were reported bul the department of hospitals salt that 8 persons were on serious lists After the fumes had billowec over the radius of a dozen blocks if area 403 persons were re moved to 7 Brooklyn hospitals lor treatment Scores of olners were treated at makeshift first aid stations set up in stores gasoline stations and nearby homes As the pungent fumes spread ver the area people toppled to 10 ground like flies eyewitnesses aid while others were sent into iolent spells of choking cough ng and vomiting The scene resembled pictures of saltlefields they said Many of the victims were sub way passengers affected when the ras descended through ventilators nto 2 subway stations Hundreds f passengers were made ill and fled to the streets where they too vere overcome falling to the sidc valks More than a score of ambu ances were dispatched to the scene along wilh police and fire units A police detail visited every home in the area seeking possible Thirtythree doctors 42 nurses and 16 Red Cross nurses aids ad ministered emergency treatmen at the scene A detachment of gas masked soldiers also aided The gas came from one of 2i tanks on the truck operated b John G Golliver of Brooklyn whi told police thai He detected fumes and stpppec the vehicle lo investigate Discov ering chlorine escaping from on cylinder he asked a pedestrian fo aid in removing the tank but wa overcome He then called police wh donned gas masks and removed the tank to the curb Police quoted Golliver as sayin he had picked up the tanks at depot in Bayonne N J and tha they were intended for shipmen to Cartagena Colombia Inspector Joseph Barbulo of In ire department bureau of com bustibles said he had obtained lummonses against Gollivcr and lie truck owner Lester J Den ncr charging them with transport ng chlorine through the streets vithout a permit He said the truck did not have special safety equipment required under the law Chlorine gas according to an authority is used by armies to purify water while civilian uses include bleaching paper and textiles Berlin Claims Tanker Sunk Near Yugoslavia London Berlin radio said Friday that German naval craft sank a coastal tanker and 6 fully laden coastal motor vessels southwest of the Yugoslvian port of Sibenik Wednesday capturing 129 soldiers 37 women and 5 chil dren The soldiers Included Brit i Russians and Americans the oadcast added There wus no al ed confirmation Sibenik is 25 iles above Split CROSBY SINATRA TO STAR Hollywood Bing rosby and Frank Sinatra will match their musical talents again aturday night when they engage n their battle of the Century on he Command Performance Radio rogram Bob Hope and Judy Garland will Iso appear on the program which roadcast exclusively to service men on the battlefronts CROUP BUSKS LEASE FUNDS Committee Also Votes UNRRA Appropriation Washington house ap propriations committee gave the lendlease administration and the new world relief setup known as UNRRA a blanket approval Fri day recommending to the full membership the identical 1S45 budget the agencies requested Tile committee reported to the house legislation providing For For UNRRA for this nations participation in the united nations relief and rehabil itation administration with ad ditional authority for the presi dent to transfer to it S3SOOOOOOO in lendlease funds which might not be needed immediately For the foreign economic admin istration the agency charged with waging economic warfare against the a reduc tion of from the FEAs budget request The appropriations are for the fiscal year which starts July 1 Lendlease aid by the Unitcil States to the allies now totals S1M 225000000 The committee de clared thai the guns tanks ami food distributed this way meant 5TH ARMY CUTS ERMANS MAIN SCAPE ROUTE Yanks Fan Out From Velletri Into Alban Hills Near Eternal City Allied Headquarters Naples Germans wall before ome began to crumble Friday as le 5th army captured both Vel ctri and Valmontone the 2 big esl fortress cities guarding the ernal city The 5th army was firmly astride ic Via Casilina after cutting it ear Valmontone threatening to ut off whatever troops the Ger lans had been unable to with raw of the 9 divisions battling n the lower front Fifth army vanguards were treading out in a wide arc from le northern Alban foothills to an rea between highway 6 and high vay 5 the via The Lepini mountains south of high vay 6 were almost completely ICiircd of the enemy the APs Daniel De Luce reported from the ront Total prisoners taken since the Hied offensive started May 12 vere approaching 20000 Velletri is an Appian Way unction IB miles from Rome Al American troops were ling out beyond it into the Alban lills fighting within sight of Romes prized buildings Valmontone bitterly defended by the crack Hermann Goering armored division is on the Via Casilina 20 miles southeast ot Rome The Germans were fight ing a rear guard action north and west of the breaklhrough on to the Via Casilina by U S tank and infantry forces The 8th army smashing up the Via Casilina pounded into Feren tino only IK miles southeast of Valmontone and also struck on the east side of the highway win ning Veroli 5 miles northeast of Frosinonc All these advances foreshadowed tie beginning of the end the battle for Rome Fall of Valmonlone and Beren tlno left a gap of no more than 18 miles between the eastern and western sectors of the allied fronts With the French driving up to the Via Casilina from just southwest of Ferentino a ring appeared to be closing tightly around retreating German remnants making rear guard stands Velletri and Valmontone were seized in the face of flaming re sistance and late FridlV head quarters said fierce fighting con tinues in this area where limited progress has been made during the day Occupation of Veroli cut yet an other potential back door for the nazi retreat It is on a junction of roads from the south and east U S infantrymen drove into Velletri Thursday All the Ger mans escape routes from the town and vicinity have been sealed off Two miles to the northwest Yankee troops fighting on Monte Artcmisio in view of Komes his the difference between rela toric very buildings obstinate were meeting opposition a Weather Report FORECAST owa Partly cloudy Friday night and Saturday with scattered thundershowers Saturday and in the extreme west portion Fri day night continued warm and humid Mason City Partly cloudy warm and humid Friday night and Sat urday Temperature Friday aft ernoon slightly above 90 Minnesota Partly cloudy with thundershowers Friday night and Saturday warmer extreme northeast portion Friday night Cooler northwest and north cen tral portion Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics lively ineffectual and an allout utilization of the resources of our allies in destroying the enemy The committee stated that it was faced with a situation now similar to the first World War In the early fall of 1918 the report said many persons thought Ger many must surrender soon but the house appropriated bill that was signed only 7 days before the armistice There was no choice then ex cept to maintain full preparation and there is none now the com mittee declared The largest Icndleasc item is for food The com mittee said the soviet union is sorely in need of food and that in the case of Britain it would ht lendlease which would make up the margin between a bare ex istence diet and enough food for the British people to produce and fight efficiently Maximum Thursday 91 Minimum Thursday night 65 At 8 a m Friday 73 YEAR AGO Maximum US Minimum 65 Precipitation 18 Miles Gives Scheduled Talk After Heating Son Had Been Killed Des Maines he had learned only earlier in the day that his son 2nd Lt William Miles 21 had been killed in ac tion Maj Frank Miies delivered the commencement address at Ot tumwa high school Thursday night Lieutenant Miles pilot of a Liberator was killed in Italy Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette I carrier boy communique said This force had snaked beyond Velletri and seized the dominat ing heights of Mts Pcschio and Artemisio catching the Germans y surprise The German high command Icclarcd the dent the allies achieved northeast of Velletri had been sealed with heavy casualties inflicted Berlins broadcast said there was fighting of very great fierceness Thurs day especially in the Velletri and Valmontone areas but that the allies had been held The smashing blows against the lazi line guarding Rome also drove in another wedge by cap lure of Lariano a village on the highway to Valmontone 4 miles northeast of Velletri Field Marshal Albert Kcssel ring had flung his touted Her mann Goering armored division into1 the line near Valmontone in a bitter struggle to hold open the Via Casilina The exact point below Valmon tone where the highway was slashed was not disclosed by headquarters Just last Friday American troops had won Artcna miles below Valmontone but it took a week of fighting lo reach the highway The British and French to the southeast squeezed tighter up the highway and the French seized Ponte Di Morolo 3 miles below the famous road west of Fros inonc Along the coastal flank of the battle for Rome naval guns again supported the British push bombarding enemy batteries near Ardca with successful results The first United States troops   

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