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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, May 1, 1944 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 1, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                                ff 4 iVjai inii J gtffc j1 i jt i jiltiia V NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME PCS THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Associated Press and United Press Full Leaded Wire Five Cents Copy MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY MAY 1 1914 Tills Paper Consists of Two One NO One Mans Opinion A Radio Commentary by W EARL HALL Managing Editor BROADCAST SCHEDULE KOLO Mason Cily Sunday p m KHMO Uaimibzl Tuesday p m KSCJ Siour Cily Wednesday p m 1VSU1 Jowa Cily Thursday p m Aroea Friday p m Some Ideas From Mail Bag jUSft ABOUT the most pleasant J and satisfying part of conduct ing a onceaweek radio commen tary such as this derives from the letters frorj listeners prompted by my various discussions Some agree some disagree Some takeissue with my premises some with my conclusions Some give inc additional information on a srfbject Ive discussed Some Miggcsl topics for future discus sions Occasionally a correspond ent will dispute my pronunciation of a certain word Two or three have suggested that I step up my speaking tempo another 2 or 3 have said slow down For some time the idea has been growing on me that I might some time be able to dip into my Mail Bug for an interesting commen tary That time has now come ABOUT 6 MONTHS ago I re ceived a book then just off the press titletl Manual for Col lege Trustees It was by former Pres R M Hughes ofIowa Slate college based on his long and dis ADMITS TAKING IN LOOT INBANKHOLDUP ftubuque Man Captured as He Sits in Car With Girl Near Her Home Dubuque confession that he held up and robbed at gun point the Prairie City State Bank oC Bagley Wis Friday of more than in currency was made early Monday by Sheldon Henry 27 Dubuque Chief of Police Joseph Strub announced Henry confessed 2 hours alter his cap ture by 2 police officers as he sat with a girl friend outside her home the chief said Shortly after his capture police found Z suitcases in Henrys room which contained in currency and change and police also held John Gaston Dubuque in whose home the loot was located Henry was captuFed only after a struggle the chief declared the 2 policemen disarming him of a revolver The prisoner said that he thought he had made a clean getaway and did not get sus picious of the officers who ques tiuned him until they asked him to produce his draft card Chief Strub said The chief said that Henry told officers that he had stolen an au tomobile here Thursday night drove it to a nearby oil station ACE OF ACES STILL AFTER JAPS Richard I Bong leading ace of the southwest Pacific and top man in the number of planes shot down in combat is shown seated in the cockpit of his P38 fighter plane which bears flags denoting 27 Japanese planes to his credit This is the latest picture of Major Bongwho is still attached to a southwest Pacific air base tinguished career in educational administration The entire talk was rather well listened to I think but one part drew particular attention Refer ence is to an excerpt from the hook in which the Ames man de veloped his contention that grad uates of a stalesupported institu tion who merely pay the pre scribed tuition as a student come out of college owing an actual and figurablc financial debt to their alma mater That happens to be my idea too In some personal correspond ence with Doctor Hughes follow ing that broadcast I asked him to amplify his thinking This he did in a letter to me which I am going to quote as my first entry in this all Mail Bag commentary analyzes all the pur poseVfor which he pays state taxes he iriust acknowledge that most oE them are used for his di rect or indirect benefit The larg est item which benefits directly only a few is perhaps higher edu million out of 160 mil lion dollars in annual state tax re ceipts Now the remark which has irked me most is I dont owe the college anything I pay my taxes Of course the idea of public high er education is that the state needs educated men and women needs doctors lawyers engineers etc and that graduates pay for state supported education in SERVICE Most do so but B per cent of the taxes most men pay will not meet in 40 years the outlay the state made on a mans education In general we misht accept Sl 200 S300 a year as the outlay on one graduate of a 4 year course For those who complete in addi tion a year medical course or the work a Ph D I think 55000 would be a reasonable esti mate of outlay 4 years at S300 4 years at If the student paid tuition and fees in many do he would pay S400 in his 4 year course and possibly 31000 for his graduate work as a maximum leaving the 4 ycnr man owing S300 and the man with 4 years as an undergraduate nnd 4 years in medical school S5000 minus Sl paid in tuition or a net debt obtained several gallons of gaso line and drove away without pay ing for it because he had no gas coupons He then drove across the low er bridge the chief quoted the confession as saying and went directly to the vicinity of Bag ley where he had formerly worked for a farmer It was this farmer who provided the infor mation that led to Henrys arrest the chief said Tracing his own movements just prior to and immediately after the holdup Henry said he Waited on the outskirts of Bagley a Mississippi river village in Grant county Wis until about 1 oclock Friday afternoon when he entered the bank with the gun in his hand and forced Miss Evelyn Miller as sistant cashier and the only per son in the bank at the time to place the currency and change in a bag he brought with him the chief said his confession stated The confession as announced by Chief Strub stated that Henry then drove to a small woods about 2 miles northeast of Bagley where his machine got stuck in the mud and he was unable to move it He stayed in the car however un til darkness fell the chief re ported and then made his way back to Bagley where he boarded a freight train and returned to Dubuque Henry waived extradition Mon day morning and was taken to the Grant county Wis jail by Sher iff A M Klaas where charges will be filed the sheriff said FINE DUROCHER FOR CONDUCT Delayed Game in Which His Team Lost 268 SPORTS BULLETIN New York C Frick president of the National baseball league Monday fined Leo Du rocher manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers and Jim WasdeU of the Philadelphia Phils S50 for their actions inSundays ball games Durocher was thumbed out of Sundays first game at the Polo Grounds by Umpire Beans Rear don which the New York Giants won by a 26 to 8 score and Frick said the Jine was levied because ofvDurochers thi field his prolonged argument au his delaying of the game WasdeU was fined for throw ing his bat in the first game o the twin bill between the Phil and Boston Braves at Philadel phia Religious Issue Is rejected Again Into Dispute Washington U R The religious ssue was projected into the notly RussianPolish dispute Monday amid signs of a new ingloAmerican attempt to un angle the territorial and political northsouth PeipingHankow rail ssues already complicating the road This new drive Chinese ontroversy 1 headquarters said has reached Msgr Michael J Ready general 1 the vicinity of Yingshang 120 i A MAN paid S20 a year as his G per cent toward the expense of his education his aver age state for the 40 years his expectancy would have to be S335 including sales tax and which I should say not very many pay The man whose education cost the state a net of S3GOO would have to average 81500 a year in stale taxes for 40 years for his 6 per cent to repay his debt to the commonwealth Of course Doctor Hughes adds this may ba a bit over drawn But for the life ot me I cant see why an alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech nology should feel any more fi nancially obligated to his college than an alumnus of Iowa State college the State University of Iowa or Iowa State Teachers col lege In each case his expenses were largely borne by OTHERS for HIS good in the hope that his services to the public at large will fully repay the cost In any case to say I pay my taxes and have no further obligation is a very poor answer to my way of thinking In the book by Doctor Hughes reviewed by me and in this letter which I have quoted he wasnt talking about somebody else He was talking about me 1 was the beneficiary of a statepro vided higher education I freely acknowledge an original debt of at least S800 How much I have 498 DIE AS U S SHIP IS SUNK War Department Lists Loss in Mediterranean Washington h c sinking of an American ship with loss 498 military personnel in the Mediterranean w a s announced Monday by the war department The date of the sinking was not given except that it was recent Nor was it disclosed whether the enemy action was by submarine or aircraft The vessel sank swiftly and 498 military personnel are miss iniz said the brief announce ment The next of kin of the per sonnel have been notified Air Raids in May Will Overshadow Record for April By EDWARD W BEATTIE London plans cal for air attacks from liow on whicl will overshadow the April recon by a wide margin and which with good weather and good luck might reduce the German ai force to a skeleton before the great land campaign gets mule way Three mouths ago that sort o statement would have bee classed as rank wishful thinking Today on the basis of full infor mation much of it still unknow publicly experienced observer think it is entirely within th limits of possibility These men feel today that a the worst the German defensiv f tenter force can be made to figl often enough and can be hur badly enough in the process tha it can he crippled once and for a when the invasion cimirs S Turn to Face IOWAN FATALLY HURT Sioux City P Theodore Nicolls 33 died Saturday night following a mishap with the jack of his automobile The jack slipped letting down the car from which he had removetl n wheel U S Tanks Attack in North Burma By RKIIAKD C BEKG1IOLZ Associated Press War Editor Two years ago Monday Lt Gen Joseph W Stilwell and his beaten allied troops started their retreat from Burma Monday allied headquarters chose the anniver sary to announce the first all American tank unit to see action on the Asiatic continent has en tered the battle against Japans supply system in northern Burma The announcement testified to the growing strength of Stilwells forces and the exapndinr success of his campaign to smash the ef fectiveness of the MandalayMyi tkyina railroad and to carve a new land route from Ledo India to the old Burma road and thus reopen the overland supply line to China Stilwells jungle fighters are within 45 road miles of the rail road terminus Myitkyina and within 44 miles of the important junction of Mgaung 40 miles west of Myitkyina toward Maudalay Headquarters reported progress in the cleanup of Japanese around Kohirmi farthest point of the Japanese invasion of India and a spokesman said the enemy confronted with serious loss of face if the Indian invasion col lapses is massing for an allout drive for the important allied base at Imphal 60 miles south of Kohima The combined allicU operations on the IndiaBurma front aimed at speeding the flow of men and material for Chinas defense and ultimately for an attack on Japan cant reach fruition too soon for the Chinese Chungking 1500 Allied Planes Lash Targets in France Belgium Invasion Blows From West and South Are Predicted London The allies proinvasion nerve war received fresh impetus Monday from a new U S broadcasting station in Britain which launched its operations Sunday by telling the people of occu pied Europe that great allied armies will be coming to their aid long from the west and BASES IN NEW GUINEA USED TO MAKE ATTACKS Target 700 Miles From Philippines Is Among Those Blasted Advanced Allied Headquarters New Guinea persist ently westward allied heavy bombers based on newlycaptured New Guinea airdromes have be gun fullscale assaults on Japa nese bases to the northwest hit ting one target only 700 miles ere long from south This twin blow to be struck in cooperation with Russian forces attacking from the east will show the Germans what overwhelm ing force can be and will end forever the shameful chapter at nazi tyranny the broadcast de clared Delivered by Robert K Sher HIT RAIL LINES OTHER GOALS IN HEAVY ASSAULT 500 Heavy Bombers Hit Main Blow Without Loss of Single Plane headquarters re ported a new enemy offensive in northern China apparently aimed at helping other Japanese col umns breaking the Chinese hold on a 150mile segment of the ecretary of the National Catholic Velfare conference raised the note Sunday when he lenounced the visit to Moscow of Father Stanis aus Orlemanski of Springfield Mass Ready said it was a politi cal burlesque and the phoniest propaganda that the usually clever idea men in Hussia have palmed off on the linitdfi Stains His miles east of the railroad and 150 miles northeast of Hankow hours after the state deparfmen announced that Undersecretary ol State Edward R Stettinius Jr had arrived at Marrakech Mo rocco to confer with W Averlll Harrimun American ambassador to Moscow and Robert D Murphy American representative on the allied council in Italy Stettinius has just completed a month of conferences in London and among the first and last per sons he met in the British capital were Premier Stanislaus M Mi kolajczyk of the Polishexiled government and his foreign min ister from the Philippines Gen Douglas MacArthurs communiuue Monday told of a de structive raid on the Schouten is lands a longrange assault 01 Sorong at the western lipof Guinea anct uir And sea hammer ing of the Wake island area clos est enemy stronghold norlhwes of Hollandia Striking to the east also airmei hurled 85 tons of bombs on We wak the enemys largest remain ing air and supply base in north east New Guinea sprayed 26 ton of bombs on Hansa Bay to th southeast and hit crippled Rabau on New Britain island with 3 tons The heaviest of these Satui days assaults was the 5th arm airforcc bombing of 2 airstrips o Biak island ot the Sctiouten group atthe wide mouth oE Geelvink London hundred or more allied planes struck at niizi installations and rail lines in ood director of the office of war France and Belgium Monday in iformations overseas operations yc nth day of the preinvasion he initial message from the U S air offensive spearheaded by a heavy bomber assault upon secret targets in northern France Up to 500 heavy bombers und us many escorting fighters deliv ered the main blow without los i a single plane ami then U S Untillhen be cautious be marauders followed up with raids on railyards in both France and Belgium feeding the German At lantic wall defenses Separate fleets of RAF diums bombed railway objectives lo the allied radio for France and mustang and thun vord that will come from the sucicrUolts hit the yards at Namur Hcmi commanders Gen Maine St Pierre in Belgium t a t i o as rged underground workers hrouehout Europe to hold them elves in readiness for the signal o strike in concert with the allied 1 rmies of liberation reet Sherwood added Y o u r ves are valuable to the allied ause Your gallant services will e needed for the hard fighting hat must be done lower in the west and Gen Sir daylight attacks followed Henry Maitland Wilson in the im RAp heavy bomber night raid outh Do not be tricked into preexploding an ammunition dump nature action by nazi lies or dcat Maintenon 37 miles southwest ception oj Paris and hammering 1 more Technical experts said the Gerrail points in France nans mode desperate efforts to At 5 p m Monday the Ger jam the air and prevent recepmail sajd that Single ion of the initial Absic broadcast planes are over western Ger n Europe but asserted that the many The broadcast was re attempts at interference were Dy u s government mon very successful The broadcast obviously part ot a campaign intended to 1 Out early over the channel give the Germans the invasion American pilots found the wea malady not unknown I ther none too good and some lor on this side of the English chan1 mations brought aieir bombs nel where the strain of waiting forl home rather than drop them un ilors in New York was 1 The U S heavy bombers roared and his crushed head and chest were Man 55 Makes 3 Men With Blackjacks Run Chicago Romito 55 years old and alone looked like easy prey to 3 men who rushed him and began swinging black jacks at a dark corner But they hadnt reckoned on Tonys trade until he jabbed them into flight with a pair of 12 inch garden shears He was a gravedigger on his way to work REDS SAY LULL WILL END SOON New Drive to Burst With Hurricane Force London sovietgov ernment newspaper Izvestia sug gested Monday that the lull on the Russian front to weather and red army regroup ings would end soon and that a new offensive would burst on the Germans with the force of a ImiTicane The Germans are now trying to guess where the next blow will fall the newspaper declared as a soviet communique reported that the land front lull had entered its second week without any import ant changes The bulletin said local nazi at tacks were thrown back south cast of Stanislawow in the Car pathian foothills nnd north of lasi on the Romanian front It added that soviet naval units in the black sea sank 2 or 3 German transports attempting to leave be sieged Savastopol TANKS ROUT JAPS British tanks covered by active air support are cleaning the Ko himi area of Japs say official reports Will Be Week or So Before F R Returns to Capital 1st Lady Says Washington liP President Roosevelts doctors are anxious that he not leave his vacation place in the south until he has really completed his rest Mrs Frank lin D Roosevelt told her press con ference Monday The first lady who reported that the president looked very well when she saw him one day last week said it probably would be a week or so before the presi dent considers returning to Wash ington The president has been at an un disclosed location south of here as part ot a recuperation program following attacks of flu and bronchial complications earlier in the year baysqme 250 statutemiles west ofHollandia air fields are in allied hands after the big April 22 invasion This midday assault on an air and supply base only 120 miles from the enemys stronghold of Manokwari sent 77 tons of demo lition and fragmentary bombs into fuel dumps and parked aircraft at Mokmer and Sorido airstrips At least 15 enemy planes were pulverized on the ground and probably 5 more were destroyed out of an intercepting force ot 12 The thrust which put allied bombers only 700 miles from the Philippines was made by libera tors which hit Jefman airdrome in the Sorong area at the end of the Turkeys Head western ex tremity of Dutch New Guinea Three Japanese planes were de molished on the ground and a 4th was probably shot down in com L out of an attacking force of 10 Still farther west Dutchflown Mitchells escorted by Australian planes bombed Dili on Portuguese Timor immediately northwest of Darwin Australia The Wakde sector 120 miles northwest oC Hollandia took a 51 ton aerial bombing Saturday and American warships hurled 75 tons of 5inch and 6inch shells into Dday is imposing a heavy bur den on nerves already worn by more than 4 years of conflict With this island swarming 1 with American and British troops the awareness of the impending in vasion has been forced on the people in many ways in the past few by the nonstop aerial offensive which has been battering at the ram parts of fortress Europe Everyone here knows that the zero hour is approaching but that fact that no one knows when it will strike is what frays the nerves and causes the drawn tense look seen on the face of the man in the street these days The average Londoner will be lad when the fireworks start Meanwhile he can only hope the enemy is feeling the strain worse than he is prime installations night Guns on island as well as along the nearby mainland coast were silenced buildings were shattered and large fires ignited throughout the area by the dou blcbarrcled attack also felt the sting of a sea assault as American PT boats darted into Nightingale Bay to sink the troopladen barges and 4 more carrying supplies At least 100 Japanese troops drowned Buy War Savings Bonds ami Stamps from your GlnbeGazcttc carrier boy Stalin Combined Blows Only Can Beat Nazis Weather Report IN MASON CITY Mason City Fair Monday night and Tuesday Not much change in temperature Iowa Partly cloudy Monday nigh London Premier Marshal Joseph Stalin in a May Day pro nouncement declared Monday that the red army and the allied armed forces must launch simul t a n e o u s on slaughts from east and west t o finish off the wounded German in his den beast own STALIN There can be no doubt that only a combined blow such as this will be able finally to crush Hitlerite Germany Stalin de clared in a broadcast order of the day which praised the allies for their considerable contribution to past Russian successes Stalin said that under the blows of the red army the bloc of fascist states is crackins and tumbling down and exhorted the peoples of Romania Hungary Fin land and Bulgaria to take the matter of their liberation from the German yoke into their own hands Reciting a string of victories since Stalingrad the premier said the fatherlands war has shown that the soviet people can per form miracles and come out vic torious from the most severe But the red armys task cannot be limited to throwing the Ger mans out of Russian soil he de clared a wounded beast who has gone into his lair does not cease to be a dangerous one Stalin said that American and British troops are holding the front against the Germans in Italy and are diverting a considerable part of the German forces from us They supply us with very valuable strategic raw materials and armaments and subject to systematic bombing military ob jectives in Germany thus under mining the military power of the latter He asserted however that the red armys successes would have been obliterated after the first serious axis counterblow if the troops had not been supported from the rear by the whole of our soviet people and by all our country Stalin said it was difficult to count on the governments of the nazi satellite countries o break with Germany The sooner the peoples of these countries stop supporting the Germans and quis lings he said the more can they count on the understandnjr of the democratic countries Stalin declared that the power of soviet industry has markedly increased in the past year and that hundreds of new factories and mines and dozens of electric aowcr stations railway lines and bridges have joined the ranks And he added that new mil lions of soviet people have gone to their lathes and have learned the most difficult trades and have become masters of their jobs The premier ordered a salute of 20 artillery salvos fired in 9 Rus sian cities at R p m Monday nitchl in honor of the red army the workers collective farmers and the intelligentsia May Day was observed at nu merous rallies in England Sunday night with bright uniforms of the united nations invasion forces forming a sea of color as speak ers sounded victory soon themes In liberated Italy more than 5000 Italian workers gathered in Naples Garibaldi square in the first open May Day demonstra tion in 20 years and meetings also were held in other southern Ital ian cities and Tuesday Colder Monday nighi Minncs ota Showers extreme north partly cloudy south and central portions and cooler Mon LEGAL FIGHT ON WARDS GOES ON Biddle F R Must Halt Labor Trouble Spread Chicago legal battle over government seizure of the Chicago plants ot Montgomery Ward and Company was resumed ill federal court Monday when Ally Gen Francis Biddle declared President Roosevelts duty o order the properties placed mdcr federal control to prcvcnl a prcad of labor trouble during he The attorney general told Judge Villiam H Holly the presidents icizurc order was not based on the ypc of goods handled by the huge mail order and merchandising con ern but was motivated by a desire 0 halt the threatened spread of 1 labor controversy Biddle argued in support of his ctition for an injunction to pro libit Ward executives from inter fering with federal operation of he facilities He obtained a tem porary restraining order to that effect late last Thursday night ind the concerns counsel filed a motion to dissolve it on grounds Tuesday partly d a y night cloudy FORECAST GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 65 Minimum Sunday night 52 At 8 a m Monday 52 Rain 12 inch YEAK AGO Maximum 55 Minimum 25 Frost The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 69 Minimum Saturday night 49 At 8 a m Sunday 52 Rain 58 YEAR AGO Maximum 65 Minimum 40 that the seizure was unconstitu certainly and endanger French civilians Other groups found holes in the overcast and reported satisfactory bombing We didnt encounter a single German fighter reported Fort ress Tail Gunner Sgt Harry Shirey Elwood City Pa What little flak saw was off in the distance Our escort was beautiful commented Tail Gunner Sgt Harland Paul Portland Ore They laid right out there to give us plenty of protection The flak wasnt bad Bostons and Mitchells of the RAF 2nd tactical air force led off Mondays offensive bombing rail targets in France under escort of RAF N c w Zealand and allied spitfires The British night blow itself followed close on the heels of the blasting which 3000 allied planes delivered Sunday against German antiinvasion targets in France Targets of the RAFs railroad busters who wound up 2 straight months of almost continual ham mering nt junctions on lines sup plying nazi forces crouching be hind Hitlers Atlantic wall were Acheres near Paris and Somain j a coalfield town south of Lille near the Belgian border An air ministry communique said that one British plane was missing indicating that the at tackers probably consisted of streamlined but heavily loaded forces The war bulletin described the attacks as heavy and well con centrated British planes also struck unannounced objectives in western Germany and laid mines in enemy waters fT Monday ISrilislibxscd planes of the II S army air forces have been over the continent lOfl out of flic 122 days of 1DW and the RAP has pounded enemy lar Kds on 91 nishts Thi massive force of Britain based planes which carried out Sundays daylight operations in cluded about 1000 heavy Ameri can bombers and their fighter es corts One heavy bomber one me dium bomber and 4 fighters of the attacking forces failed lo re turn Escort pilots shot down 18 German aircraft and destroyed a number of others on the ground while bomber crews bagged 7 Ger tional and without egal authority j Biddle stated the firm handled hay spreaders corn and cotton planters and other kinds of farm equipment and added All needed for growing food for the all essential to war The litigation was watched throughout the nation as a test of the governments power lo take over facilities listed as nonwar by their owners A federal operating manager took possession of the plants last Wednesday after Sewcll Avery chief executive officer of the com pany refused to accede to orders from the white house and the war labor board to extend a contract with a CIO union man planes These daylight operations wound up a month which saw at least 100000 tons of explosives and Buy War Saving Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy probably more dropped in Ger many and occupied territory by aerial fleets operating from both Italian and British bases Lt Gen lames II Uoolittlc said that American fighters and bomb er suncrs hirine heavy bomber missions by the U S 8th air force in April knocked out more than 1300 German total substantially more than the en tire German aircraft production for the month In a broadcast to the United States Sunday night the 8th air force commander placed the April losses of his command at 359 bombers and 144 fighters The enemy fighter kill included more than 800 German planes blasted out of the sky in aerial combat   

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