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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 15, 1944, Mason City, Iowa                                SAVE I AM PAPER VJAm Ammunition For f or Throw Me Away OF HISTORY Alia ARCHIVES Sit loinis i A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHIORV HOME EDITION ITTTTTTI TOL L Associated Press and United Press Full Leased Wires Five Cents Copy MAS9N CITY IOWA SATURDAY JANUARY IS 1944 NO 2240 Tons of Bombs Hit Brunswick Plane Plant Center in 23 Minutes t IT TAKES A LOT TO FIGHT A tons of Ij supplies and equipment are required to fight even a com paratively small battle and the problem of getting these 11 articles to the battiefrbnt is one of the greatest that must ljbe solved by a military commander This photo shows how 1 itiis done in the south Pacific Half dozen LSTs are pulled up on the beach on Cape Gloucester New Britain to unload thetremendous quantities of vehicles ammuni tion gjms food and other suppliesthat are packed on their decks and in their holds The craft are manned bythe United Stages navy and coast guard This is an official United States coast guard photograph i 15 FIERCE NAZI IR1VES BEATEN OFF IN HEIGHTS French Troops Push Forward 2 Miles in Battle for Cassino By EDWARD KENNEDY Allied Headquart ers Algiers French troops staving off o counterattacks in fierce lighting on the right wing of the pth army front in Italy have lushed forward 2 more miles to ward Cassino it was announced aturday capturing the village of quafondata and 3 its in its vicinity important Pressure by the French forces Gen Alphonse Join was over a considerable Valour their msnntain line north west I Casting and greatly strengthened flank of the Americans driv toward stronghold 70 V JThe advance ofthe French iput khe allies in a commanding posi tionori heights entirely suirrbund the village of Viticuso which tiow apparently was in allied Control The Berlin radio announced riday that the Germans had Acquafondata which fs approximately 7 miles northeast I All the heights takeu by the lrench were over 3000 feet V Mt Ferro the most advanced Lfthe 3 is 2 miles northwest of anddirectly over looking the village of Vallroton llawhich is about 6 miles north I Ind slightly east of Cassino I They also took Mt Pogano 2 Itiiles southwest of Acquafondata luid Mt Pile 2 miles northwest of the German 6 Violate Car Ration Laws Fined Paul Minn J R Watkins company Winona multi million dollar food extracts and patent medicine concern another Winona company and 4 officials of the companies were fined a total of Saturday on charges of violating rationing regulations in the purchase of 6 automobiles The defendants had been in dicted in December by a federal grand jury on 8 counts charging falsification of information in purchase of the cars which eventually were used by members of the King family owners of the Watkins firm The machines were purchased from the Owl Motor company ofWinona whose presi dent was E LKing son of the head of the yWatkins com Natives Circled MERCURY DROP pany The defendants and the fines assessed by Federal Judge Robert C Bell r cpm Local Flyer Who Fell in Jungle EDITORS Additional details of the many exploits of st Lt Don C Bellows sonof Mrs fan C Bellows formerly of 643 4thN E Mason City and now in one Beach are described in he following dispatch from the New Guinea front by United Press Correspondent Ralph Teatsworth By RALPH TEATSWORTH Advanced Fighter Base New uinea Jan of the veteran lightning pilots here who expects to go lome soon on furlough is 1st Lt Donno C Bellows 27 of Mason City Iowa and Long Beach Cal He has had many hair raising experiences but the one he re members was when IS PREDICTED Des Moincs er was forecast for Iowa Saturday GUNS OPEN FIRE ON JAPS AT IN NEW GUINEA Allied Drive on Huon Peninsula Coast Sweeps Near Successful Climax By MORRIE LANDSBERG Associated Press War Editor The campaign to clear the Japa nese from the Huon peninsula coast of New Guinea swept toward a successful climax Saturday while allied bombers ranged over the skies of the southwest Pa cific in a series of destructive raids Australian troops pushed close enough to the Japanese barge point at Sio on the northeast coast of New Guinea to send artillery fire into enemy positions indieat nightwitri the mercury dropping below the zero mark in some sec1 tions The weather bureau said the temperature might drop to 5 below zero at Mason City 2 below at Waterloo and zero at Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Lowest read Ling Fridaynight was 11 above at Iowa City he was f i rnost torcetV to crash land 75 miles behind the enemy line The right engine of his plane was shot out and caught fire The BANK CASHIER DIES SUDDENLY E H Klisart Victim of Heart Ills Saturday IrfViticuso The fiercest blows was made some 5 I Mies north of Acquafondata the San Pietro ridge Dnrinc the first 2 days of their inirent campaign inthis sector he French have taken 250 pris it was announced American forces to the smith rAdwest of Cassino have plowed nto strong enemy fortifications lin Mt Trocchio last big physical on the road to Cassino are engaged in hard fighting I The Germans have covered the I ilopes of the mountain with mor Ijars arid machinegun nests re slow determined effort to I root themout II Extensive patrol activity con lUnued the 8th army front arid linescouting detachment plunged the enemy lines south of Ipivitella inland beyond Cassqli became involved in a sharp likirmish Iii the air allied bombers I Kinged across the Adriatic and IVtucked the Mostar airfield and Vhe Sibcnik area in Jugoslavia Itcoring hits on several merchant tressels Medium bombers attacked a trailway bridge at Ponlecorvo in he Cassino area while other planes blasted gun positions at anleiia and San Guiseppe Hits vere scored on the port of Anzio outhwest of Rome Five alliedplanes were repbrt Ijd missing aaginst 4 enemy air destroyed in the days op ations pany company 57500 E Li King Jr Fred G Jackson vice president of the au tomobile firm 52500 and C Mills former acting cbntrolei for the Watkins company King Si who is one of Minne sotas wealthiest was sin gledoutby J u d ge Bell f or ad monishment This country has been good to you Bell said You have ac cumulated a fortune You could not have clone this anywhere in the world except in the United States which is now engaged in a deadly struggle with its enemies The purpose of the government was not to run your business but to prevent inflation which would protect your business as well as all others Every citizen should make every sacrifice within rea son to aid the war effort All the defendants entered guilty pleas with the exception of Mills now located in New York who entered a plea of nolle con teridre the KAISER CLUB FORMED Chicago UP Henry J club has been 1 formed to back the west coast in dustrialist for the republican pres idential nomination V and or Gray Chicago attorney an nounced Saturday Iowa cashier of the H Klisart 54 Citizens v State bank in Iowa Falls died suddenly ing it may not be long before that base falls to the allies The Japa nese have been attempting to flee the area1 in barges Capture of Sio would open the war for allied control of more than 160 additional miles of coast line Sio is 65 miles north of Finschhafen taken by the Aus tralians last September and 55 miles south of Saidor where units of the U S 6th army landed 13 days ago Fierce fighting was reported from Cape Gloucester on the northwest coast of New Britain Associated Press War Correspon dent Murlin Spencer wrote from the invasion front in a Jan 13 delayed dispatch that the U S marines were expecting to take Hill 660 which controls the entire Borgen Hay area but that the Japanese were forcing them to fight step by step Allied planes spannednearly seat also w Sas so thick that he crashed white Undine because he couldnt sec he ground A nioniffnt after he got out the gasoline tank blew up but Bellows had not a scratch He vyaded through kunai grass chestHigh to a point about 50 yards from his plane He was spotted 2 hours later as he waved lis life jacket to two other pilots They circled and dropped a note vhich said Sorry be back to norfow 1 v A short time later 3 natives found him hiding in the grass He ave them cigarets and chocolate They1 motioned for him to follow hem to their village but Bellovs relieved he would be turned over lo the enemy and decided to stay riear his plane The natives told him that they would bring him bananas the next day and went away muttering so sorry master Bellows peace of mind did not improve when in the evening a lone line of natives circled his position singing and dancing He lay qniet and kept his pistol ready but after ah hour and a half they went away Bellows rationed his water and cigarets so that they would last until 9 oclock the next morning He took a smoke and a drink ev ery 3 hours his sleepless night Just as Tie had smoked his last not pre SOVIETS Russian offensive within a month has been opened by red army forces in White Russia shown on this map The soviet troops that captured Sarny were reported to be advancing westward toward Kovel80miles away Russian Troops Smash Deep Into Frozen Pripet Marshes Moscow Konslantin Rokossovskys White Russian army surged deep into the heart of the frozen Pripet marshes Saturday toward the industrial river city of Pinskv95 miles to the west fol He viously ill Mr Klisart was borri at Ossian and spent his early life there He started to work in a bank at the age of 16 years and later organ ized the bank at West Bend He continued there until 1933 and 2 years later came to Iowa Falls Survivors are the widow and daughter Miriam He also leaves 3 sisters and 3 brothers The body was taken to the Wood funeral home where ar rangements are pending lowing capture of the neighboring DIES AT GAME Seymour Myra Cole 47 died in the stands of the Sey mour gymnasium where she had gone to watch her daughters Ona and Jeanette competein a girls basketball game Friday night cigaret and finished his water he heard planes A formation of 9 American planes circled his posi7 tion and dropped a note telling him to follow them a mile and half to a clearing He followed the in structions was picked up and got back to base an hour later I learned later that 1 was only 4 miles from a Jap outpost he said 3000 miles of separat Netherlands Eas tT Indies to the Solomons In the longest flight liberators ignited the Balikpapan oil refinery on Borneo more than 1000 miles northwest ofAustralia Other attacks caused damage on Celebes island Portuguese Timor Cerahvand Dutch New Guinea Liberators delivered the heav iest blow against Alexishafen in the Madame area on the northeast coast of New Guinea dropping a total of 75 tons of explosives on enemy personnel and supply points Japanese positions on New Britain including Rabaul were bombed A 7000 ton cargo ship probably was sunk off Kavieng New Ireland and Bougainville in the northern Solomons was at tacked at both ends At Hick am Field Hawaii Maj Willis H Hale commander of theU S 7th airforce dis closed that 9 Japanese island air bases in the central Pacific singled out for attack had suf fered80 per cent destruction Halesaid his bombers on 50 missions destroyed 119 Japanese planesand probably 74 more and expressed the belief that the Jap anese were making strong efforts to reinforce the Marshall islands terceptors in Some places That was the case of an attack on Mill in the Marsha Us announced Fri day In which no enemy fighters were encountered v afford Serial protection wis indicated in a compilation of their plane losses Based on allied com muniques it showed that 2594 Japanese aircraft were shot down in the Pacific during the last 6 months of 1943 against allied losses totaling 378 cities of Mozyr and Kalinkovichi His forces already have plunged to Skrigalov 20 miles beyond Mozyr onthe south bank of the Pripet riverFall of Mqryr was REACH PEAK AS RAF DROPS 150 TONS A MINUTE Fires Visible 150 Miles as Smoke Rises 3 Miles Into Sky London royal air force dropped more than 2240 tons bombs on the German air craft center of Brunswick in 23 minutes Friday night hitting a peak of 150 tonsa minutethe air ministry announced Saturday The shattering bombardment of Brunswick in a followthrough of the American attack on the same target Tuesday kindled fires vis ible 150 miles through dense clouds which sent up a column of smoke more than 3 miles high Light mosquito bombers struck at Berlin and Magdeburg in a diversionary feint whichdrew alt German fighter strength and no defense planes arrived over Brunswick during the attack The British raiding fleet how ever ran into stiff fighter oppo sition on the way in many of the Herman planes launching rockets n a frantic effort to break up the RAF formations Brunswick was covered by bro ken clouds and pathfinders ringed the target area with in cendiary markers before the bom bardment began The first bombs crashed on the city at p m unusually early in order that the raiders could be well on the way home before the moon came up Hundreds of the 4en Cined heavyweights blasted aad seared Brunswick from to Bellows has the distinguished flying cross wilncluster and air medal with 2 clusters as a whole The American raids have proved sodestructive that the en emy has stopped sending up in Weather Report FORECAST Mason City Fair Saturday night and Sunday colder Saturday night lowest temperature Sat urday night Mason City 5 be low Iowa Partly cloudy Saturday night and Sunday Colder Sun day arid in west portion Satur day night Minnesota Mostly cloudy Satur day night Sunday Occa sional light snow northwest por tion Sunday Colder Saturday night and in south and east portions Sunday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 48 Fridaynight 13 At 8 a m Saturday 19 YEAR AGO IMaximum Minimum Minus 3 Way Flying Forts Line Up Provides Bristling Defense in flicted on the fleelnc Germans the Russian communiQue said as Kokosso vsky s C a ssacks ski shp d veterans and light mobile units plunged westward through the marshes regarded as one of the most formidable naturaldefense obstacles in the soviet union More than 40 smaller towns and villages including the rail station of Kitsury 16 miles west of Kal inkovichi on the north bank ot the Pripet were liberated in the 4th day of Rokossovskys advance the bulletin added and 3000 nazis were killed South of the marshes Gen Niko lai Vatutins 1st Ukrainian army broadened its front along the KievWarsaw trunk railway and crossed the Horyn river 10 miles west of Sarny More than 30 towns were captured in this advance in cluding Stcpan 35 miles north of naziheld Rovno important junc tion on the KievWarsaw railway supply artery for the German 6th and 8th armies in the Dnieper river bend far to the southeast The twin offensives of Vatutin and Rokossovsky were rolling westward approximately 60 miles apart along the only 2 rail routes serving eastwest traffic through the Pripet marshes Vatutins drive south Sarny threatens o outflank Rovuo from the west and the Germans stif fened their resistance in the area between fiovno and Novograd Volynski 55 miles to the east De spite this the Kussiaus continued in an assault obviously to erase the city of some 15MM persons and its M aircraft plant bzomlM urse Snatcher Jabbed fith Hatpin Flees Buffalo N J hose traditional feminine wea back in style and Mrs ouise Cloen for one is glad she was walking under a Iiaduct Friday night she said a boy attempted to steal her purse beat a hasty and empty handed retreat when she pulled out her hatpin and jabbed him the chest By FRANKLIN BANKER i AP Features A U S BOMBARDMENT I IV IS I ON HEADQUAR TERS aerial warfare its the formation that counts and thats why the allies i are winning the air battle of Europe The U S flying fortresses that are blasting the German war machine to bits use a tight for mation utilizing the maximum fire power of their 50caliber machine guns Although these gttris enable a fortress to fire in every direction it is vulnerable to multiple nazi fighter planeswhen it eels out of formationand is alone Knowing they are potentially dead ducks in such a case the smartest pilots fly in the tightest possible forma tion This formation called a stag gered altitude flight is a product of the war on Germany Air force officers credit it to a flying and shooting brigadier general Cur tis E LeMay 37 of Columbus Ohio He put the idea into effect within 6 days after he landed here a year ago General LeMay who hai pio neered in several important armj air corps developments initiatec the most remarkable flight of the Bth air ing of Regensburg He fs com manding officer of this bombard ment division The LeJVIay formation adopt HEADON VIEW German FiffctwY View of Two Fortress cd by the air corps as standard operating procedure made Amer ican daylight bombing a success after the Germans and the British abandoned daylight raids as im practical It was a revolutionary shift from the javelin formation de veloped early in the Pacific war The javelin formation com prised sharp Vshaped groups of 3 planes groups following one another at the same altitude TnTsDroved inadequate against the mounting strength and in genuity of GfelOM figHter attacks General LMa7ti answer was tJ his bombers cagily at staggered altitudes to provide the widest cover of protective fire for every ship in the formation A group of Lforts usually comes at the nazis in 3 squad rocs aligned like a circular stair way The lead squadron is in the middle Below it and slightly to the rear at its left is squadron 2 also called the low squad ron Squaffron 3 the high squadronf1 is above slightly to the rear and right of the lead squadron V planck are staggered in the 3 dimensions of the length breadth and depth They fly only 50 feet apart Many groups of bombers placed like this participate in a mission as a bombing raid is called The number of in the formation may vary Sometimes there are 18 sometimes 21 The left rear plane of the low squadron is flying in whatsome pilots call the Tail End positionor Purple Heart corner In dubbing it that they claim it undergoes more casualties than claim the other positions However some officers the Tail End Charlie position suffers no more casualties than other planes in the group This closely knit formation makes it virtually suicide for an enemy fighter to attack Some steelnerved nazis plunge head on t the formation Usually they are slaughtered by the system of crossfire with which the for tresses protect one another The 8th air force on some raids has put in the air enough for tresses to exceed the fire power of all the German fighter planes scattered over the farflung western air front As all these German fighters cannot be gotten into the air at the same time and place the forts have the edge on them Hence the Germans are ex perimenting with rocket shells andother xnew methods of comr bating the B17s1 which so far have held their own Husky blackhaired LeMay a veteran pilotgoes along on a raid himself when new risks are in volved even to manning the ma chine guns Last August he led and com manded thay fortresses which de molished the huge Messerschmitt plant factory at Regensburg Ger many The bombers shot down 110 enemy planes during the 1400mile flight from England to north Africa On the shuttle trip back to England they destroyed an airfield at Bordeaux France Hit the target right theIirst time the general ordered his men They did to advance dispatches said killing ill nazis and wrecking 11 tanks and gnns In the lower Ukraine where the Germans reportedly are launch ing their heaviest counterattacks against advancing red army troops Vatutins left wing con tinued to repulse strong enemy tank and infantry forces east of Vinnitsa in the Ukrainian Bug river sector Here the Germans are attempting at all costs to halt the soviet drive for the Dniester river and Rumania and the tre mendous losses they are sustain ing is expected to have an im portant effect on the further de velopment of the campaign in that area In one savage attack the Ger mans lost 2000 men killed many captured and 35 tanks and 29 ar mored cars were destroyed by Vatutins troops Large stores of German war gear also were taken the communique said bombs on the MesserschxnHt fac tory and probably destroyedJUT but one plant in their record pre RocketPropelled Fighters Are Sent Up by Germans Stockholm nights heavy RAF assault on Brunswick forced the nazis again to put up their secret rocketpropelled fight er planes which they uncovered for the first time iri TuesdayV historic American assault the Berlin correspondent of the news paper Aftenbladet said Saturday Thenazi rocketpropelled type is similar to the newlyannounced allied jetplane but driven from the rear by explosive fuel instead of from air sucked in from the front and then superheated and supercompresesd almost to the explosive point as in the allied type The rocket power was said by the correspondent to enable the new nazi fighter to climb miles in 2 minutes instead of the usual 15 minutes However only topnotch pilots were said to be able to withstand the sudden chnnge of pressure ex perienced in the climb which was described as more terrific than that undergone by divebomber pilots It was reported also that the nazis are building a new type ot automatic machinegun which con tinues to fire on the target after the gunner is killed or wounded It was described as having a rate of fire much faster than anything now used A traveler frtfm Halbersladt one Liberty Ship Carole Lombard Is Launched Hollywood If The Liberty Ship Carole Lombard named for the blond film star who was killed in an airplane crash on Jan 16 1942 while on a bond selling tour went down the ways at the Cali fornia shipbuilding yards at noon Saturday Irene Dunne actress was selected to christen the ship and Mrs Walter Lang former secretarycompanion of Miss Lom bard was named matron of honor of the targets hit in the Tuesday American raid on central Ger many said the city was under at tack for 45 minutes when between 60 and 70 per cent of the factory producing nazi fighters and planes was wrecked and other plants manufacturing machirieguns for the fighters were badly damaged cision attack Tuesday the British night raiders sought to blot out Brunswicks housing communica tions warehouses and subsidiary industries as well as to complete the destruction of the plane works Huge fires were left burning the air ministry announced The big night bombers again feinted toward Berlin in an at tempt to confuse enemy defenses then suddenly hit Brunswick 125 miles to the west while mosqui toes went on to hit the nazi capi tal and Magdeburg 80 miles southwest of Berlin Thirtyeight bombers were lost in all raids the air ministry said Sixty American bombers were lost in Tuesdays heavy daylight raid on Brunswick and other im portant targets in northwestern Germany The Stockholm newspaper Af tonbladet reported that 500 bomb ers were over Germany during the night with 100 attacking Ber lin but the air ministrys an nouncement that2000 long tons   

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