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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, November 1, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 1, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                Id i NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT Associated Press snd United Press Full Leased Wires MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Five Cents a Copy MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY NOVEMBER 1 1943 HOME EDITION irnrni Food Subsidies Vital Congress NEED PROGRAM TO MEET GOAL OF 1944 CROPS President Gives Reply to Those Who Have Assailed Guarantees Washington UR President Roosevelt told congress Monday that continuation of his program of and support 5th Army Fights Northward in Italy Captures Teano Americans Advance 5 Miles Up Mountain Through Heavy Rains added the blunder ot the first world of soil conservation be avoided no new dust bowl be created The president staunchly de fended his support price program for food products pointing out several times that the same prin ciple was being used in industry and mines to increase production The subsidies that were used to meet special farming costs without raising prices to consum ers cannot properly be called pro nnu Queers suDsicliGs orconsumer prices Iwv said They are war the greatest food production subsidies The which thej goal in history in are war costs 000 more acres of crops than in 1343 His program he said will not only furnish the united nations with one of their most potent weapons to shorten the war and win a lasting peace it will make possible fulfillment of our pledge to the farmers to guard against a price collapse for the 2 years after the war Mr Roosevelts demand for ex tension of the life of the com modity credit corporation and for additional funds to guarantee farmers a definite return on the 380000000 acres of crops they will be asked to plant next spring was made in a 12000word mes sage to congress It was a vig orous and detailed explanation and defense of his farm and food policies since the war began while emphasis has been on more and more production and of the early new deal farm program of acreage restriction It was the longest message ever sent to capitol hill by Mr Roose velt and required almost a month of preparation in addition to 19 long pages of single spaced type there were attached 4 paces of supplementary data The message was Mr Roose velts answer to those in and out of congress who have threatened to kill his state congressmen and i of the 4 big farm organizations The house banking and currency committee already has reported a bill to ex tend the iife of the CCC bin added an amendment to prohibit the use any funds for subsidies with minor exceptions after Jan 1 1944 Sir Roosevelt did not state how much more money would be needed to finance his pro gram but pointed out that the CCCs 1943 program had cost the government 8350000000 and Ihe rollback of meal and butter prices another This expenditure of S8000DO 000 per year is a moderate sum to pay in order to accomplish the objectives we have in mind greater production and lower con sumer a whole year he said In fact it is about equal to the cost lo us of waging this war for 3 days He emphasized lhat food was as much i weapon ot war as air planes guns tanks and ships thai it was n potent psychologi cal and morale weapon to use in countries overrun by the axis As the result of greater need for more food he said the war food administration has raised its sights for 1944 calling for 380 000000 acres of crops instead of the 364000000 acres in planting that should result in the breaking of food production rec ords for the 8th successive year All acreage restrictions im posed by the AAA in former vears have been removed for 1044 the president said Only tobacco marketing will On the farm as in industry the war has pushed costs above the levels that prevailed before the outbreak of war and above the levels that wil prevail when vic tory has been won These are costs of war and it is entirely ap propriate that they should be met out of the public treasury just as are the costs of producing tanks and planes and ships and guns He reiterated citing many statistics to support his reason ing his determination to hold theHne against inflation The nation cannot afford to acquire the habit of inflation he said because we have children to think of Those who advocate inflation must be prepared to accept the responsibility for re sults he added By XOLAXD XORGAARD Allied Headquarters Algiers allied 5th army seized Teano control point to important roads flanking the enemys Massi co Ridge anchor in the relentless milebymile march up the Ital ian peninsula allied headquarters announced Monday With equally steady progress the 8th army smashed through the the villages controlled and prices and wages This is no time lo start wan dering inlo an untried field of uncontrollable he said The president reviewed the food production program of 1943 and asserted that despite cries in some quarters of meat famine and food shortage the American peo ple as n whole are eating more they did before Pearl Harbor A shortage in sirloin steaks VI KJII1 nicclrta and jn choice fruits he said does not mean that the war pro gram has failed Ninetythree per cent of American housewives agree that a good job ot food distribution and job fair to all been done Unfortunately the per cent who are not satisfied are more vocal Mr Roosevelt said the patriot ism resourcefulness and ability of the American farmer had in 1043 to overcome manpower machin ery and fertilizer shortages to pro duce an incredible amount of food He promised that the amount of the steel for farm machinery was being doubled and that ft would be unlimited for production of repair parts He scotched talk about im pending meat famine with a report hat from October until next March lotal meat produc tion excluding poultry would amount o H400010001 pounds dressed weight compared with during the same pe riod lisl rear He conceded that the armed forces and lendIcase would take more of the food supply next vcar per cent of production for the armed forces comparer with 7 last year about 25 per cent of to tal production Then he added that there would be move soldiers in both the American army and navy and the allied senices and pointed out that servicemen eat more than civilians The average soldiers or sailor eats pounds of food a half as much again is the average civilian who cats only pounds per day singing with chiagodena and Frosolorie This advance placed Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys warriors within 9 miles of Iscrnia central bas tion of the German mountain line Between these 2 sectors American troops performed 1 of the campaigns most spectacular single day achievements when they advanced 5 miles through downpours and up steep moun tain slopes to seize Valleagri cola a citadel perched on a 2000 foot hill 4 miles north of Raviscanina iu the push to ward Venafro A military commentator said reaching this objective would have been hard enough for an ordinary peacetime Sunday aft ernoon walk but the Americans covered the distance in the face of intense enemy artillery mortar and machinegun fire and despite carefully laid minefields guardin the approaches Teano too was lakeir only after a furious battle with elements of the Herman Goering division Lt Gen Mark W Clarks troops wasted no time in capitalizing on the capture of the vital road cen ter and farmed out swiftly to the northeast and northwest to cut Ihe highways piercing he Ger mans defense lines to the north of Massico Ridge Captured documents showed that the Germans had attached Ihe greatest importance to hold Teano 10 miles northeast of towering Ml Massico and 12 miles northwest of the Volturno river crossing at Capua Gen Montgomerys Slh army gained the high ground on both sides of the road that runs from Foggia to Isernia and thence io Rome These veterans slugged through bitter resistance to capture Canlalupo 9 miles from Isernia and on the southwest side of the road in a S mile drive Macchiagodena the same dis tance southeast of Iscrnia is on Ihe northeast side of the road and was taken in nn advance of a mile and a half Farther to he northeast Kro solone fell lo units which blasted a 3 mite palh and established themselves 12 miles from Iscrnia Montgomerys Adriatic wing was limited to patrolling as a re Mill of heavy rainfall along the Trigno where the Germans had converted San Salvo railway sta tion into a heavily gunned for tress Meanwhile American flying fortresses carried the air offensive into southern France from Medi terranean bases for the 2nd time in the war bombing the tmpor tant road and railway viaduct on the coastal route 5 miles south west of Cannes Son Coal Mines Idle in Nation as Workers Await Developments By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The vast bulk of the nations 174QOO soft coat miners laid down their tools Monday to await fresh developments in lie dispute over a new working comvacl An early morning survey showed virtually complete of operations in West Virginia and Pennsylvania each having abou 110000 bituminous workers ilarly Ohio reported all of its mines closed and 21000 idle Indi ana pYoduction had about stopped willi 7000 out These reports came in as mem bers of the united mine workers policy committee gathered in Washington for a session sched uled to start at 11 a m but de layed until 3 p m because of late arrival ol delegates Momentous decisions were in the offing involving a choice between ordering the mine workers back to the pits or taking other action which miffht provoke presidential interven tion and a new government seizure of the workings All Saints clay celebrated Monday was not a factor in the soft coal picture because it is not a regular holiday in bituminous fields Many anthracite workers do observe All Saints and Penn sylvania reported some 80000 hard cbal miners out with 520 collieries closed on this account The soft coal situation in ilic various states shaped up this way West shutdown of the states 600 mines was ap parently complete with about 110000 idle There wasno dem onstration and a coal local official said the men were sitting tight and awaiting the report from the policy committee fiorn both union and operator sources showed a virtually full shutdown in western Pennsylvania soft coal fields employing 110000 and 1 220 mines All captive mines of the U S Steel and Jones and Laughlin Steel corporations were closed Union sources said hos pital and other emergency needs would be taken care ot survey by oper ators indicated no Alabama mine was working Some 22000 are AJtnuajssi clasetfc 31 Indiana Operations virtually at standstill and nearly 7000 idle estimates indi cated all of states 25000 united mine workers were out and thai those quitting had been joined by approximately 2000 of the states 15000 progressive mine workers that coal would be mined agreed to await the results of the miners meeting before acting Defiance ot the government almost cer tainly would mean seizure of the mines again a step which would place in effect the criminal pro visions of the war labor disputes act Persons guilty of encouraging an interruption then would be subject to imprisonment and fine 3000 Iowa Miners Are Reported Idle Des lUoincs thou sand Iowa miners were idle Mon day as a nationwide strike tied up Ihp countrys coal industry Ive had reports from enough companies that 1 imagine no mines are operating at all George Heaps Jr secretary ot the Iowa Coat Operators association said SOVIET FORCES AIM FOR COAST OF BLACK SEA Armored Spearheads Cut Deeper Into Heart of Fleeing Germans Moscow Soviet advance guards bypassed Perckop from the north Monday and raced on to the Black Sea coast to seal off the Crimea and trap upwards of 90000 German troops The red army overrunning Hie Qermaiis at will in every Missouri and Kansas These 2 HOTEL is REOPENED Chicago Stevens ho tel reopened its doors to the pub 1 UULlin 111 TC POT be maintained Furthermore he I carrier boy I rooms available states covering district 14 re ported nearly all of the areas 2 000 workers out complete shutdown involving 8000 work ers Stoppages Costly to Steel Output Washington With coal production near collapse district leaders of the United Mine Work ers gathered for a crucial policy meeting Monday at which ihey face thechoice of ordering a re turn to work or provoking de cisive action by President Roose velt Although UMW President John L Lewis gave no hint of his plans the outlook favored a back to work order by he policy commit tee But how soon and lo what extent such an order would be obeyed was more uncertain The best possible results cpud not mean normal produc tion before Wednesday and government officials are not that optimistic They are fear ful ot ivildcal or unauthorized stoppages which already have proved costly to the nations steel production schedule Fuel administration orders con trolling the distribution of coal for home use indicated prepared ness for any eventuality while the war production board revived talk of a nationwide cut in elec tric power lo conserve coal Delivery of anthracite already has been barred to any domestic consumer having more than 10 days supply The fuels adminis tration also has forbidden retail delivery of more than half a ton to n customer Alabamas mines which feed the fires of major steel producing plans were hit earliest and hard est in this 4th coal crisis in j j months On Saturday only 1601 of the states 22000 miners were on the job In West Virginia the largest producing state the word passed by local unions iras No work tomorrow Many anthracite collieries had voted lo be idle Monday because of All Saints day traditional miners holiday At the bottom of the walkout was general dissatisfaction among he miners over the dis position of their wage demands the expiration of their working orders Sunday mid nigM The policy committee ending a general strike last June fixed a deadline of for work without a contract A threat lo quit sooner if the mines were turned back to private ownership was not earricd out I President Roosevelt asserting of more than two thirds of the Nogaisk steppes above the Cri mea and smashed ahead toward Kherson at the mouth of the Dnieper Soviet armored and motorized spearheads cut deeper inlo the heart of the fleeing Germans leaving behind tens of thousands of nazi stragglers to be mopped up by the cavalry and infantry The battle oC the Nogaisk steppes appeared slated to go down in history as one the mostdisastrous defeats ever suf fered by the German army Khakovka the main crossing of he lower Dnieper also was bypassed by the speedy soviet advance toward Kherson but an other Russian column was mov ing toward the city from 15 miles to the east The Russians were almost with Big 4 Agree on Plan for Peace f Death Blow to German Propaganda London Britain hailed the sweeping declarations from Moscow Monday as the death blow to Germanys most ef fective propaganda weapons and rs a very considerable contribu tion lo hastening Ihe end of the war1 After reading the communique on Hie tripartite decisions in a conference room packed with scores of journalists from all over the world a foreign office spokes man said that this evidence of collaboration both during and af ter the war knocked the props from under nazi propagandists who have encouraged their dupes to expect dissension among the allies The historic conference and its concrete evidence of harmony among the United States Great Britain and Russia was hailed as a source of very considerable gratification to all fiee peoples of the world A spokesman said that in he European advisory commission you tee the beginnings of prac tical collaboration and the fore runner of a general internation al organization for the mainten ance of peace ft seemed apparent that the question of an invasion of Europe bad been settled He said he was not at liberty to discuss if when or where Presi dent Roosevelt PremierMarshal Joseph Stalin and Prime Minister Churchill would meet suggesting perhaps that the 3 chiefs of state would not meet soon The communique explained that the new council for Italy would supplant the present Mediterran ean commission Unity of Action for Defeat of Foe Pledged at Moscow Conference AP Closer cooperation on the battle 1routs and united action in the peace to follow victory through eventual creation of a general international organi sation were pledged at the historic Moscow conference bv the Linifced States Britain and Russia China joined in on the peace move Attended by Secretary of Stale Hull Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden of Britain and Foreign Commissar Vyache slav Molotov and their staffs the conference was the first of its kind A tripartite communique issuedat the conclusion of 12 meetings running from Oct 19 through Oct 30 said the con ference was marked by frank and exhaustive discussions of the measures to be taken shorten the war against Gerternational organization based on many and her satellites in llic iwincipie of the sovereign Europe Suggesting front in inai a iront in olt Europe already had been set the stfs laSe and small for comraimioue said tlie nlamlcnancc of international x cIllIlUSl W1U1 in sight of tne entire left bank of the Dnieper from a point below Nikopol to one below Khakovka The Russian thrust to the Black Sea beyond Perekop fol lowed the capture of Chaplinka 14 miles north of Perekop and more than 200 other villages in a lightning 24hour dash across the Xogaisk steppes The last railway and both highways from the Crimea have been cut The only escape for the uwis still remaining in the Crimea is by sea The Germans were re ported to have built piers nlone the Crimean west coast for just such an emergency but their use i probably will be neutralized bv the Russian Black Sea fleet and the Red air force The Germans attempted 1 counterattack to stem the soviet tide but resumed their retreat at greater speed after losing I 000 men and 1G tanks Nazi troops abandoned their weapons in wholesale lots in their race to es cape Russian flying columns that cut them down by Ihc thousands The enemy is suffering en ormous fosses iu men and ma terials the soviet high corn maud said in its Sunday mid night communique Pursued by soviet troops he is retreating arms and ammunition A large number of prisoners has been taken Soviet t a n k s and Cossack ca ia 1 ry spearheads bypusscd scores of German garrisons and straggling columns in striking for key objectives leaving them to be mopped by infantry One front dispatch said the battle had en tered upon a phase of extermina tion such as the German com mand once had dreamed of im posing upon Russia Car and Train Crash at Milford 2 Killed Milford P Hanson Eureka S Dak and Mrs Theresa Obcnuter Sioux Falls both about 30 were killed when their car and a northbound freight I ruin collided a the south edge of Mil ford Saturday Collective Action j Washington generally hailed the Moscow agreements Monday as a long step toward collective action to insure future world peace but they differed over their relation to the senate postwar resolution Undersecretary of State Ed ward R StcUinius Jr who handed copies of the agreements to the press termed them en couraging and said The American people a great debt of gratitude to Mr Hull for his magnificent contri bution lo Ihe success of Ihe Mos cow conference At the capitol Senator Connal ly chairman of the foreign relations committee and author oC the pending postwar resolution told reporters lhat the portion of the agreement pledg ing the allies continue hostili ties against those axis powers with which they respectively arc at war until such powers have laid down their arms on the basis of unconditional surrender should silence those who hnvc been ex pressing fears that Russia might conclude a separate peace with Agreeing with this latter view Scnntor Wheeler DMont said he hoped the principles of the 4 freedoms enunciated for Italy shall be established throughout Europe ami the world1 1 note no mention was made of the Atlantic wonder why Wliceler said Connally said a portion of the agreement calling for establish ment of a general international organization for the ance of peace coincides with the purpose of bis resolution communique said Advantage was taken of the presence of military advisers representing the respective chiefs of staff in order to dis cuss definite military opera tions with regard to which de cisions had been taken and which are already being pre pared in order to create a basis or the closest military coop eration the future between the 3 countries China was dealt in on a sur prise 4power declaration where by the United States Great Brit ain Russia and China pledged themselves to united action in the peace to follow unconditional sur render of their respective enemies and to establishment oi a gen eral international organization 1ylwS peaceiln secui Weather Report FORECAST Iowa Continued cold with freez ing temperatures Monday night no decided change in tempera tures Tuesday Mason City Continued cold Mon day night and Tuesday lowcsl temperature Monday night in Mason City 2G Minnesota Occasional light snow extreme north portion Monday main and Tuesday forenoon Slightly colder with frceziiiw temperature M o n d a y nighT Iittle change in temperature Tuesday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobcGasclie weather statistics Maximum Sundav 46 Minimum Sunday night 26 At Sam Monday 30 YEAH AGO Maximum 53 Minimum 2 Precipitation 21 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 42 Minimum Saturday 34 U S a m Sunday 41 Rain Saturday 75 inch The Chinese ambassador in Moscow Foo TingShciing signed this agreement on behalf of his government along with Hull Eden and Molotov Documents embodying the Moscow agreements were made public simultaneously Monday in Washington Moscow and London Highlighting fruits of a confer ence which included also declara tions governing the restoration a nonfascist Italy a free Aus tria and n RooseveltChurchill Stalin pledge io punish those guilty of atrocities the 4power document stressed unity of action and consultation between powers with a common enemy Russia is not at war with Japan until unconditional surrender was achieved Set Up Commissions In a joint communique tile tri partite conference agreed lo es tablish an AmericanBritishRus sian European advisory commis sion in London to examine Eu ropean questions arising as the war developed The foreign minister also de cided to set up an advisory coun cil on Italy with representatives j from the French committee Jugo slavia and Greece The council on Italy will deal with day to day questions other than military preparations and make recommendations designed to coordinate allied policy with regard lo Italy The 3 foreign ministers also said that military experts at the conference discussed definite operations already decided and now being prepared to create a basis for the closest military cooperation in the future be tween the 3 countries Other questions besides current problems taken up at the confer ence Ihe communique said con cerned treatment of Hitlerite Germany and its satellile eco nomic cooperation and assur ance of general peace j Frank and exhaustive discus sions of the measure to be taken to fhorlcn the war against Gcr cquality of all peaceloving states ind open to membership by all peace and security 5 That for the purpose of maintaining inletnational peace and security pending the rees tablishment of law and order and the inauguration of a system general security they will consult with one another and as occasion requires with other members ot the united nations with a view lo joint action on behalf ot the com munity ot nations 6 That after the termination of hostilities they wil not em ploy their military forces within the territories of other states ex cept for the purposes envisaged in this declaration and after joint consultation 1 That they will confer and cooperate with one another and wHh other members of the nnitecr nations Tobving about a practicable general agreement with respect o the regulation armaments nod in the pastwar pe On European War China did not participate in the other declarations dealing with the European war They were 1 President Roosevelt Prime Minister Churchill and Premicr Stalin promised that those Ger man officers and men and mem bers of the nazi party who have been guilty of directly or by be taken back to the scene of theii crimes after the there many and her in Eur ope also took place the com inumque declared 4 Power Declaration In ihc 4powcr declaration to which China adhered the nations said 1 That their united action pledged tor the prosecution of the war against their respective ene mies will be continued for the organization and maintenance of peace and security 2 That those of them at war with a common enemy will act to gether in all matters relating to the surrender and disarmament of that enemy 3 That they will take all mea sures deemed by them to be nec essary to provide against any vio lation of the terms imposed upon the cncrny 4 That they recognize the ne cessity of establishing at the ear liest practicable date a general in tried according to the laws of the country concerned Britain Russia and Hie United States agreed on allied policy toward Italy based on a determination to wipe out fascist influence and lo give the Italian people every opportunity to es tablish governmental and other institutions based upon democrat ic principles 3 The 3 also declared that Austria 1st free country to rail victim to Hitlerite aggression shall be liberated from German domination The join 4power declaration obviously left the way open for Russia to remain neutral as far as Japan is concerned but provided a guarantee that neither Russia nor the western allies would sign a separate peace or take other sep arate action against their joint enemies Wrilcrecognizing the necessity of establishing at the earliest prac ticable date n general interna tional organization the 4 powers did not attempt to specify the na ture of that organization beyond tle wellknown American policy of insisting upon equality ot sov ereignty of all peaceloving stales with membership open lo ail such slates large and small Regulation of armaments after lie was left in such a time as the united nations will con fer with one another to briiifr 1 limit a practicable KCM eral agreement In their declaration on Austria Ihe 3 powers said they regarded the with Gennanv as null nnd void and considered themselves in no way bound by nny changes in Austria since then The future or the Balkans may be affected by the next clause They declare that hey wish lo see reestablished a free and independent Austria and thereby lo open the way for the Austrian people themselves as well as those neighboring slates which will be faced with similar problems lo find that political and economic security which is Ihe only basis for lasting peace Then a warning and an invita tion to all Germanys satellites Ausiria is reminded however that he has a responsibility which she cannot evade for par ticipation in the war at the side of Hitlerite Germany and that in thft final settlement account will in   

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