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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 27, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 27, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT Of HISTOSY Afi3 AK OES MO THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL L MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS itsi and United Presi Full Five Cents a Copyl Postwar Education of Servicemen Advocated MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 27 1913 President Believes Nation Obligated to Provide Training Washington billiondol lar program to provide postwar educationalopportunities Tor men and women in the armed services was recommended to congress Wednesday by President Roose velt The program was developed by a special committee of edu cators which Sir Roosevelt ap pointed last November when he sirneti into law the drafting of men 18 and 19 years old In sending ii lo the capitol the president urged prompt legis lation to put its broad outlines into operation Suggested by the committee and approved by Mr Roosevelt were recommendations that the federal government make it finan cially possible for every man and woman who has served 6 months or more in the armed forces since Sept 16 1940 effective date of selective service to receive a years training in an educational institution to equip them for gain ful pursuits in peace time The committee and the presi dent also proposed that in addi tion a limited number of service personnel selected for special apt itudes be permitted to carry on their education for an additional 1 to 3 years The federal government would meet not only the educational costs but provide money for main tenance In a message transmitting the committees report to congress air Roosevelt said he believed the nation was morally obli gated to provide training andi education and necessary finan cial assistance to service per sonnel that it was an obligation uhich should ne recognized now and that legislation to that end should be enacted as soon as possible We must replenish our supply of persons qualified to discharge the heavy responsibilities of the postwar world Mr Roosevelt said We have taught our youth how to wage war we must also teach them how to live useful and happy lives in freedom justice and decency While the successful conclusion the war is by no means within sight the president said it may be well said that the time to prepare for peace is at the hcUht of war Setting up an educational pro gram now Mr Roosevelt added would help maintain the high morale of troops The members of the special committee were Brig Gen Fred erick H psborn director of the army service forces special serv ice division chairman Capt Cortlandt C Baughman director of the naval personnel bureaus special activities President Bufus Harris of Tulane university Dep uty Price Administrator Dexter M Keczcr Dean Young B Smith of the Columbia universitv law school and John W Studebaker federal education commissioner The committee decided that while the armed forces could help with training the burden primarily will fall on civilian educational institutions and that the program would be unprec edented both in its magnitude and in the educational designs required It is suggested that all quali fied service personnel desiring to be allowed to obtain a years ed ucation or training beginning not later than 6 months after leaving the service Those who would get additional training would be apportioned among the states ac cording to the number of service men and women coming from the states The financial arrangements which the committee had in mind would give every fulltime stu dent tuition and fees at an ap proved institution plus S50 a month for single persons S7S for married men and for each child to met living expenses Part time students would be al lowed tuition nnd other school fees For those permitted to go on beyond the initial years training the financial arrangements would be the same but with an added plan for federal loans up to a raximum of S50 a month for those unable to meet expenses with the grants provided KEEP BEES IN TREE Griswold they live on a 50 foot town lot Mr and Mrs Guy Cocklin have found a way to keep bees They placed a hive high in a tree bees swarmed there and recently they harvested a supply of honey BILLION DOLLAR Threaten on 2 Fronts PI AN K IIRPFn BY ROOSEVELT Washington labor front rattled with controversy Wednesday with strike threats booming over 2 warvital indus and a result of these developments 1 Soft coal miners received with cold reserve the war labor boards proposer substitute for an Illinois model wage agreement 2 The WLB set Thursday morning as a deadline for re sumption of all coal mining and said strikes in effect then would be certified to ibe president pre sumably as a prelude to a 2nd government seizure of the mines and the invocation of penalties gainst the union under the anti strike law 3 Fifteen nonoiterating rail unions joined the S transporta tion brotherhoods in ordering a strike vote as a protest against government rejection of their wage demands John L Lewis united mine workers president at home with n heavy cold declined comment A union spokesman however re marked that the board has sinned away its day of grace and expressed doubt the substitute plan would be acceptable The union offered the Illinois plan as a model for the entire industry The WLB said it could not ap prove the Illinois plan which would have increased earnings S150 a day for a 40hour week or less It said it could approve increased earnings of a day The boards alternative pro posal would increase the earn ings for a 6day week more than compared with an Sll in crease under the agreement as submitted The earnings for the last 2 days of the week are higher because of the overtime rates after 40 hours These figures apply lo the in Side laborer who gets a basic wage ot now for a 7hour pro ductive day The board pointed out mostminers receive more than that and that average earnings for a6dav week of 51 hours would be about 560 Setting a deadline for the cessation pf strikes the board sent telegrams to Lewis and other XFMW officers saying The nation cannot tolerate such impairment of vital coat pro duction If strikes do not cease by Thursday morninic the board will immediately refer the matter to the president for appropriate action The strike ballot in the railroad case was made returnable Nov 25 The union chiefs made it plain hat whatever the result of tiie poll no strike was to take place until authorized and that all ef forts at peaceful settlement must be exhausted first They issued a statement reviewing their case including the 8cent hourly wage increase recommended by an emergency board in May and the presidents request that they ac cept it Subsequently stabiliza tion Director Fred M Vinson set it aside Marble Rock Youth Killed at Dougherty Warren John Haitdley 19 Mar ble Uock was killed when the car he was driving lcrt the high way about half mifc east of Dougherty at 1 afm Wednesday morning according lo Sheriff Tim Phalen who investigated the ac cident Handlcy was driving east with Duane Knapp 19 Marble Rock on the main highway leading out of Dougherty when the cm crossed the road and turned over on the north side of the highway pinning Hundley beneath it Knapp was not injured in the accident The 2 boys had spent the evening in Dougherty ac cording to the sheriff It vns be lila lieved by officers that a flat tire ing Rome oca or broken steering apparatus both closed Wednesday of which were discovered on the Air warfare intensified This Paper Consists ot Two One NO 16 ARE TAKEN IN 3 TO 6 MILE GAIN fx T 1 or Jvrivoi Rog Tanks Fight Allied Airmen Smash at Greek Airfields Supply Lines in Italy By EDWAKU KENNEDY Allied Headquarters Algiers troops advancing 3 to C miles have taken 2 more towns below the Tiigno river in Italv but fighting generally subsided as the last of the German rear guards were pulled back into the massive new mountain line suard rcports clis Allied Vessels Pour Arms Into Italy for Next Stage of Action By HENRY T GORRELL Bari Italy lib erty ships and other allied vessels are pouring a constant stream of arms and equipment into this southeastern port for the next stage of the European invasion Conell could give no indica tion of what the next stage of he European invasion would be but Premier Marshal Jan C Smuts in a speech in London last week predicted allied forces would ad vance into southeastern the As fast as they are unloaded the ships push off again for norlh Africa and another load There are no prospects of the ships returning home for many weeks possibly months in view ot the urgency their Men nnd equipment also are being unloaded steadily at several other ports along the Adriatic and at Toranto on the Ionian sea but it is Bari which Benito Mussolini used as a springboard for his in vasions of Albania and Greece that sees the most activity Its topnotch lateral highways and railroads are buzzing with mili tary traffic British warships also come and go on important missions the de jails of which cannot be revealed in full However it can be said that they are constantly sinking and capturing German shipping trying to run the gauntlet to Dur azzd Albania car caused the accident Born April 13 1924 at Marble Rock the son ot Mr and Mrs Herschel Handlov Hatidley had been graduated from the Marble the left bank of the Trigiio river Rock high school when 17 years of ase and had beelt with his father in farming since that time He had passed his physical exami nation and was lo enter the armed service in November Surviving are his parents and n brother Max Handley Funeral arrangements are incomplete The body was taken from the Meyer funeral home to Greene Tills is ihc 4th traffic fatality in the county in 1943 It is the 3rd fatality occurring outside ot Mason City 1 having occurred in side the city limits this year FRANK MILES PROMOTED Des IHoines Miles public relations officer for the Iowa selective service has been promoted from captainto major Gunderson Appears at Hearing on Proposal to Lift Margarine Tax Washington Frank L Gunderson testifying before the house agriculture committee in support of legislationto remove federal taxes and restrictions on margarine was asked Wednesday by Representative Andresen R who had invited him to the hearing and he was being paid by anyone Gundecson appearing as n rep resentative of the national research council replied that Chairman of the com mittee author of the measure had invited him and he was receiving no compensation Fulmer interposed that he find invited Gunderson andother wit nesses because were thor oughly familiar with the subject He also has Invited a representa tive of the dairy Interests Fiilmer said in an attempt to get the facts Gunderson testified margarine fortified with vitamin A would be preferable to butter with a low content of the vitamin smashes at Greek airfields and hammering of enemy supplies and transports in Italy The nazis are withdrawing to NAVY S FIGHTING CHIEFS HIGH COMMAND THESE are the 15 top men who rufe Ihe seven seat fat I Uncle Samfive admirals eight viceadmirals one rear admiral and one lieutenantgeneral On this Navy Day Oct 27 they diretf the mightiest seagoing force the world has ever seen The pictures identify them by rank and tetl in what zones or mand tVA stands for viceadmiral RA rear admiralI ATLANTIC FLEET Red VA J M IOQO 5 ttlrv fr near the Adriatic const hcadquar ters said and 8th army units in land on this flank have taken Civita Campomanrro and Acqu avivi Collecroce Both about 7 miles below the Tiignn American troops lo the west occupied high around fating llas sico ridge an anchor of the new German line They established themselves on Mad Dog Hill near Raviscanina and on another ridge near Krancolise The only heavy fighting Tues day was in the 8th army advance to Ihe 2 towns Canadian troops were in the thick of the fighting nnd acquitted themselves well front reports said The German emphasis on their defenses in the center ot Ihe front was undoubtedly based on the realization that the road running from Vinchialuro lo Isernia was of vital importance in buttling their new mountain line An allied advance along this road which runs through the main northsouth valley of the Italian peninsula would threat en Venafro a key point in the new line Withdrawal of nazi rear guard into the mountain defenses might be likened to the pulling up ol ladders by n medieval army as ii gathered behind the walls of it fortress to defy an enemy llireal ciiingto batter them Taking up of a new mountaii line does not necessarily mear the German plan is simply lo to to hold it It is quite likely the will try to raise the siege of for tress Europe by a terrific counter offensive In Ihe opinion of some allied leaders there arc many reasons why the nazis may camblc on such a move One is Hitlers desperate need for a victory lo boost home morale and anoth er is Field Marshal Eruiii Rommels need for a triumph to reeslablish his earlier reputa tion as one of Ihe best centrals this war has produced With no prospect ot major vic tories on the sea or in Ihe air and with winter coming to the Russian front Italy offers virtual ly the only opportunity for the Germans to deliver a smashing blow at the allies U S Mitchell medium bomb ers penelraled across the Balkans again Tuesday to bomb Salonikas Sedes and Hegalo Mikra airfields just outside Greeces 2nd largest city They were escorted by P3R lightnings but no cnemv fighters were met Pilots reported excel lent coverage for both fields by bombs This blow the 2nd delivered against the Salonika buses fol lowed upon attacks npin Herak lion airfield at Crete Monday night by RAF bombers Heavy bombers of the north west African air force were idle Tuesday but allied fighterbomb ers and light bombers stepped up the pace of their blistering at tacks against enemy communica tions behind the lines in Italy and the Germans attempted to retaliate by sending a few FockcWulf ino s raiding over 8th army positions at the north end of the battle line The allied planes ripped up rail way targets motor transport road junctions supply dumps and I troop positions returning without loss t 48 Killed as Stairs i Collapses at Bullfight Merida Mexico ties at Izamnl 40 miles from this city said Wednesday thai 48 per sons had been killed and more than 80 injured when a stone stair way in front church collapsed during m impromptu bullfight The accident occurred Monrfav Previous estimates of the mimbc killed varied from 38 lo 100 ANTIFASCISTS QUIT CONCENTRATION ian iintiiasLisls place their nieajjer belongings in a wajjuu with the aid of i British soldier be lore leaviiiu St tli Bar raccano Italy eomcntnitiou camp after the allies took over Other prisoners who must remain in the camp look on NonFather Draft on National Basis Heads for Conference Wont Delay Drafting of Iowa Fathers Washington re quiring that all available childless men be inducted ahead of prewar fathers was headed toward a sen atehouse conference Wednesday wilh Indications that it is not yet out of the controversy stage de spite virtually unanimous house approval The measure swept through the Des Moiues of house Tuesday while President several hundred prePcarl Har RooseveltwassianirCganother bill bor Iowa fathers scheduled for boosting government payments lo next month is not being held up dependents of servicemen Under because of the latest action of he the new law first fruits of which house of representatives Bri will not be reflected in govern Gen Charles 11 Grahl slate di mcnt checks for several months vector uf selective service said because of the bookkeeping en Wednesday tailed a wife with 2 children for The house Tuesday passed a example will be allowed S100 a bill to defer drallins of prcPearl month instead of the present S72 Harbor fathers unlilall single men The war dcnarlmcnl which and all childless married men emphasized that dependents arc have been called but measure nol required to file new appli has not been acted upon by the cations said that when the senate in the 3000000 fam Gen Grahl explained thai stale ily accounts finally selective service headquarters is completed the difference be cannot alter the Iowa induction tweeii Ihe old and new rates will schedule without authority from he paid retroactive as of Oct national headquarters 26 Meanwhile benefit checks We have received no such or ivill continue al the old rales der he asserted Iowa like all Under the new schedule a wife tller states has its calls to fill alone continues lo receive S50 a uui we mus head and be month a wife with one child S80 reiltlv to those calls with what and those with more than 1 child cvcr mei1 ire available until di rective S20 extra for each addi clecl differently tional child he general said be believed some such fathers wjll be taken The proposed new draft bill would not prohibit the deferment of nonfathers but would require Hint fathers of children born prior lo Sept 12 1M not be called while nonlathers are available for induction A single man de ferred because of occupation would not be available for in duction Immediate beneficiaries of tiie legislation should it become law would be fahers holding socalled nondeferrable jobs The bill spe cifically would prohibit the induc tion of any man because of occu pation nullifying a recent war manpower commission order de signating certain jobs as nonde ferrable regardless of dependency status Efforts lo amend the hill by rcqiiirinsr that tallicrs under 31 years of age he inducted ahead of the older ones and to rcmnve the distinction between prewar children and those born after Sept 12 1942 were defeated Accepted unanimously was a I provision permitting Ihe aminalion of approximately 500 000 discharged service men to cie j termine whether they would be acceptable under now physical j standards That the senate unuld not ac cept tiic house version without controversy was indicated by Senator Hill majority whip who said the measure un doubtedly would be sent direct to conference in an effort to compose differences between Ihe Iwo brandies by virtually every draft board in the slate next Notice Signed by Hitler Hirohito Asks Windows Be Soaped please tallow explo ChicaRo Children soap this window read in many south side stores The notice says Soap arid paraffin arc used in sives If wasted on smoariim property there will be less pow der lo be used against us The la bor necessary to remove and re pair damage caused by pranks is wasted cflorl This u to m lo it friends The mcfsage In Halloween prauKsltrs is signed Hitler and Hirohito When buying a pack of cigarcts ronlriliulr flr li Ciffarcls for Servicemen to buy pack for a man in service overseas Weather Report FORECAST lasim Cily Continued cold Wed nesday night lowest tempera NAZIS TRY TO RETARD GAIN OF RUSSIAN FORCE German Chiefs Gloomy Apparently Preparing Public for New Losses London soviet troops storming the outskiils of Krivoi Hog the German command Wed nesday took the gloomiest tone toward the Russian front since Stalingrad in an apparent effort lo stiffen the public and army alike for an impending military calastrophe A larsc German withdrawal movement in the Dnieucr bend was announced by Ihe Berlin radio ami by their own accounts the nazis were bcinit pounded back from Ihe Mcliopol area all Ihc way to the region west if Smolensk A fircat and fateful fink battle was thundering from Krivoi Hoy important iron and steel center northward lo Kremenchug as Ihc Germans attempted lo retard the advance of Ihe reds But even this big counlcrallack could do no more than score a few iso lated defensive successes nl fear ful cost This was taken to indicate that the Soviets were broadening the base of Inchtriangular salicnl driving down upon Krivoi Rog and the fall of the city key lo ihc whole German defense in the Dnieper bend was imminent Spearheads of one soviet force northern arm of n great pincers designed to cnuap those enemy units still inside Ibe Dnieper river have captured Karnovatka main rail center for he Krivoi Rog area on the north bank of the Sak sahani river a Russian communi que said Although the nails threw fresh tank forces some of them transferred from Italy into Hie defense of the strategic stronghold soviet armor drove them buck and left 2UOU German dead 1711 he battlefield Ihe bul letin declared The southern arm of the pincers uncrating out of Meli limol was said to have uiiiturcd Vescloye 21 miles lo the mirlh wcsl after particularly fierce fighting and was believed surging ahead to close the gap which would seal the fate of the Germans trapped in tiic loop of the Dnieper between Melitopol and Dnepropetrovsk Other soviel columns were fan ning out uf Melitopol into the steppes above the Crimea Tiic Moscow bulletin said they captured nearly 100 towns Tues day in advances of 4 to 12 miles which cost the tiazis more than 3000 killed Southwest of Dnepropetrovsk giins of i miles or more were re corded by red army columns which drove the demoralized Ger mans back further west toward the rapidly closing jaws of Ihc overlapping pinccr armies Fortv thrce towns wore liberated in cluding Uic district center of Solo noye A Mh Russian army Kmtip was blasting its way toward the mcnkaiVikolaev northsouth rail way a possible escape valve for the Dnieper bend and the Moscow bulletin said this force was within miles of severing j the line Tuesday Red a r m y air squadrons ranged up ami down Hie front from KremcnehuK to Melitopol and far lo the wcsl blasting rmifciitra lions of flceini Ger mans They wrecked railroad trains and smashed more than j 170 trucks and carts loaded with war ccar ratins for the ISus river defense wall between 150 j ami Ur miics lo the west Mos cow said i The Russian communique ic I ported only minor recotmaissantr i artillery action nn sectors of front in ihc far north but Bei said Ihe red armv hid bunched an atlack west ot Kri chcv in While Russia Hard fighting was reported noun VISITS tIUSBAND Walter Thore son returned from Santa Barbara Cal where she has been with her husband Capt Walter Thorc son who was a patient in the HOES General hospital receiving treat ment for wovmcls received in ac tion in the south Pacific area AUK Oiptiiin Thoicson has been transferred lo the Shick hospilal in Clinton for further treatment MI Sugar Control Provision i Is Abolished by OPA Washington office of price administration Wednesday abolished a sugar control provision requiring sugar beet processors to hold 15 per cent of monthly proj duction for delivery at direction I of Ihc price agency The OPA re ported the improved shipping sit uation makes it no longer neces sary lo hold bee susiir for emer gency shipment outside normal marketing areas ins positions on the cast side of the Dnieper but neither Berlin nor Moscow had anything to xiv regarding the situation around Kiev Ukrainian capital 150 miles northwest of Kvemcnchus where forces arc said lo nave the German garrison practically Minnesota Warmer weil and 1 isolated north and not quite so cold j southeast portion Wednesday s night and Thursday forenoon Iowa Warmer west and central and continued cold with frosl and freezing temperatures ex treme east portion Wednesday nighl warmer Thursday tore noon IN MASON CITY weather statistics Maximum Tuesday III Minimum Tuesday niiM Jll At 8 a in Wednesday 21 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum i St and Mrs i launu Kanscn sold their 40 acre i chicken farm lo Walter Pike and imrchascd Mrs fa tiicrs Forest View plant yanicns 1 west uf luwn Her f nl h c i Ceoifie CnlbfrtMiti n Alei I Ioa i Minn will continueIn have n intercut in it i   

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