Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 23, 1943 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 23, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                DES KOINES IA NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME Associated PrM5 and United Press Lcised w MASOX CITY IOWA SATURDAY OCTOBER 23 1943 THE NEWSPAPER THAT flight of on a rolling field in Markham vallev behiud l attack by across river case While some men wlio ha nesses others tree tops after leapi jump has been attempted in battle and the first cific area c niht smoke to paratroopers land ier which screens ie important Lae their eliute har J Others float iust vas tlie lowest that a mas use of paratroops in the Pa RAF Pounds Kassel 44 Heavy Bom bers Missing BATTLE MANY NAZI PLANES Frankfurt andCoIogne Also Hit at Night By ROBERT STURDEVANT London great force of uV fought their through many nazi fighters to deiiver tiated attack ou the Germa C0nter Kassel u UL m the Brit ish raid of the month Fortyfour heavy bombers failed to return but the 4eneined Planes fought back stubbornly sending several fighters hur tling from the dark skies A smaller force of heavy panes struck at Ihe same time at Frankfurt making it thc 2nd raid in 18 days on that indus trial center and mosquitos rounded out the nijhts bomb ing attacks with an assault on the Cologne area A lle neavy bombers again r agan their terrific punches at German industry to the day and attacks that American and fighter planes have been conducting against nazi commun ications and fighter fields Ger man raiders stabbed at London lor the th successive night clron ping a few bombs Not since an RAF armada hi Berlin on the last night in Aug ust had British bomber losses bee so severe Fortyseven aircraft failed to return from that raid The Berlin radio increased the figure of Friday nights British losses io 48 shot down over south west Germany The lesser attack on Frankfurt more than 400 miles from Berlin was the 39th of the war on that big automotive rail and rubber cenfer While the official report men tioned that bad weather was encountered during the 400 mile roundtrip to Kassel it said that visibility was sood over the target and hat 1st reports indicated the explosives had been concentrated indicating that thc RAF probably had equalled or even exceeded the 50 ons of bombs a minute dropped during the last Kassel raid on Oct 10 Kassel which is 100 miles northeast of Cologne is one of Germanys key aircraft tovus and also the site of the Henschel Lo comotive Works largest of its kind in Europe The city has a big assembly works for Mcsscr schmitt UMW to Make Intense Effort to Get Miners Back on Job u ILJlVi 111 Kill that unless production is resumed JJIUHLHLIUII is resumed it appeared the board would have to refer the case to thc white house Referring the case lo President Roosevelt presumably w o u 1 d mean the government would take control of the mine Davis suggested and union of ficials agreed that telegrams be sent to all local leaders notvi in vv tl j tt f them to visit miners personally personally mcl ask them to get back on the liear George Flood Editor at Emmetsburg Dies Emmctsbur ijp George Flood 45 editor of the Emmets burg Reporter for 16 years died Friday of a heart attack He is survived by his widow and his mother Mrs James Flood and 4 sisters a iear Uiomas Kennedy secretarv treasurcr of the UMW and wil MUch district president told the board they hatl been leaving nothing mdone in an effort to end the wildcat walkout by 20000 Ala Oama miners The board had called union of icials to explain why the miners acl not obeyed a WLB order of ast Saturday to return to work Strihc lhe he tvini nu IT uoara uial he thought the surrender of govern monfiT control Ocl VJA lpl not a major factor in the walk out but did thi a contract had influenced man J mmers to walk out Appearing with Kennedy be fore the WLB was John Hann ratly Alabama union official mnwii iiniuiai Lewis is ill at his home in Alex andria Va Claim 33 Allied Ships Sunk So Far in October London Berlin broadcast said Saturday that German sub marines have sunk 33 allied mer chant ships thus far in October and seriously damaged an addi tonall3 broadcast recorded by Tlie Associated Press said 8 of the sunk or damaged ships were British and the others American BOMBERS LASH JAPS WITH NEW GUINEA ATTACK Nippon Concentrations of Troops Blasted in Big Aerial Display Allied Headquarters In The Southwest Pacific was strewn among concentrations of Japanese soldiers and their quar ters were levelled Thursday by 221 tons of bombs in thc biggest display of American aerial de structivcnoss ever concentrated in a single day of the New Guinea jungle war Reinforced enemy triiuns at battelbcrg 15 miles northwest of Australianwon Finschhafcn came under he bombstehts of liberator heavy bombers in a raid announced Saturday by General HlacArlliurs hcadquar ters MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS U S Artillery Crushes Nazi Tank Counter Drive at Alif e By WES GALLACIIEK the central sector 5th army troops have seized commanding heights it MMIS announced Saturday This was the first appearance of German tanks in any num ber in some lime but Field Marshal Gen Albert Kcssel rinjis counterattack failed as did a similar effort on the 8th army front near Jlontecilione The Germans now firmly en trenched in their new mountain positions launched a series of counterblows designed to throw the 5lh and Mth armies off bal ance Allied troops not only beat Place all to pieces said Capt George p Dun more bombardier of the first plane over the target i never saw such good bomb ing before Twentyfive iu Ui1Uiii8s were blown up The others were damaged badly Australian soldi of 28 buildings 2 miles to lalcc Luuuru which controls high ground in central Italy In sea actions small units of the American and British navies including U S patrol torpedo boats sank captured or damaged 5 nazicontiolled vessels The tor pedo boats darted far up the LLOYD GEORGE 80 IS MARRIED London David llovd George the whitemaned gem fe Captured Reds Attack Violently as Nazi Lines Crumble secretary ll an soldiers whn uaricci lar the in bitter larue f i h r Les Me ijaht horn from new bsisn in Hi Mii e g ing with this considerable Japa nese force to prevent the enemy from forging a nlc of e rape to the sea later reported seeing mnny bodies of bomb vic tims Never before have liberators struck in such numbers nround Finschhafcn Never before have Japanese soldiers ii the New guinea jungles been pocketed in o such a large human target tor the 4enginetl bombers But military leaders foresee still more heavy ground fight inir in the sector Tllc Japanese reinforcements are believed have infiltrated into Satte it e arca the north after failinE to arrive ui time to prevent the fall of Irmschhafen to the Aussie 9th division Oct 2 The day of the liberator assault M S iedUm caused 1 landslide which obstructed a or Dutch WIIL BUILD ADDITION Des Moines is scheduled to start at once on a masonry addition to a Des Moines ordnance plant building under su pervision of Maj j c Stewart irrny area engineer at Sioux City The J enemyoccupied vil lages ahead of Australian 7th di vision troops moving along the Kamu valley toward Marian Thc owflying Mitcheis wrought their destruction around Bogadjim Ma dang s mam defense outpost Still more American air power vas unleashed against Japanese air bases in the northern Solo lions Three times in t day mcd iim bombers torpedo bombers divebombers and fighters swarm ed over Kara airdrome at Bnin I on Bougainville tearing up the runway blowing up antiaircraft oakeries and destroying 5 parked planes At nearby Kahili fighler escorteci liberators spread fires despite the inteiceplint efforts of Japanese fighters 6 of which were shot down Medium bombers went after gun positions at Bal lale airdrome on nearbv Short land island Other medium bombers struck 4 times at docks supplv dumps buildings and barges at Choiseul island Allied raiding losses re ported were 3 horn from new bases in the Medi terranean to make their raid the air allied homber fleets continued their Balkan campaign bimitiinjr the airdrome at Elcvsis near Athens The allied communique said illi army troops had captured com manding heights in the central sector of their front and arc ex ploiting this gain but diM not identify the avea The heaviest fighting Friday oc curred near Atife captured earlier J the drive up the bend of the Volturno river Kesselring brought up some ot his seldomseen tanks backed up by infantry and artillery and lashed out in what 5th army head quarters described as a vcrv ac tive the AinciIcun guns which caused such great havoc in German ranks par ticularly in the latter phases of the Tunisian fight brought the to a standstill with There is no question now but that he Germans are firmly es tablished in a number of strongly hcld positions all along the front an allied officer declared 7 Bluffs Youths Are Hurt When Car Goes Over 40 Foot Bank Council Bluffs Seven Thomas Jefferson high school youths were injured one critical ly when their car plunged over 40foot embankment imo ihe town dump at mineola lVidav light They were cnroutu home from a football game at Adair Hospital authorities said Sat urday the condition of Jack Mc Gruder was critical He was suf fering from head injuries shock ind possible internal injuries four others were in the hospital John Van Scoy Bill Keteml Uiarles Hronk and Dick Hoist Ives and Kldon Wicdeman prime minister in the last war was quietly married at Hit age of 80 Saturday to MNs Fran ces L Stevenson since ID 13 Miss Stevenson was describee at the Versailles peace conference as the blond bewilderment of Versailles because the statesmen there could not understand such a lovely woman being secretary to a politician She is 55 years old Ihe bride is the daughter of a Scottish fanner and French mother She worked witli Lloyd George nil through the career that reached its yonith when he be came prime minister in ISIG Now Britains elder statesman he occasionally attends the sessions of the house of commons but do votes most of his attention to his Surrey farm DAVID LLOYD GEORGE to Secretary Servicemen lo buy pack for Will Cut Manpower But Boost Firepower in Infantry Divisions Washington wu jc nmlmcnt seeking to step up the cliiciency of thc armv ground forces has ordered inran try divisions reduced in man power and motor greatly increased Melitopol a City of 75000 has been thc scene of street RKhlinK for about 10 days Us fall Lo the Russians virtually closes the escape door for ho ipiniinc trnm rim fVlmr i r it iui ii um me u tinea of Melitopol there are steppcsacrosswhich tlie red army could roll io block any attempt on the part olthe Germans lo flee the Stalins order of he dav ad dressed to Gen Tolbnkhmsaid Forces from the 4th Ukrainian front followingstubborn battles lasting many days have broken tlie enemy s savage resistance and inflicting heavy losses have to Railroad Unions Plan Strike Poll Chicago of tlie 5 railroad operating unions voted Saturday to conduct a strike poll among their 350000 members The action was taken at a Joint meeting of the Rencral chairmen of the 5 organizations after the leaders had voiced dis satisfaction with a proposed wasrc increase of t cents an hour They had demanded a pay hike of 3D per cent The 4 cents an hour pay boost was suggested last month by an emergency board but spokesmen for the unions termed it an in sult The union delegates also form ally rejected thc proposed wayc increase and arranged lo appoint A men from each organization 10 prepare and distribute the strike ballots on a nationwide basis Officials said it iO davs before the balolts are returned but thai thc results mav be known in 20 days Spokesmen reported the vote in favor of the strike referendum was unanimous The general chairman approved a resolution which maintained the ave o gained possession of the town and rail road station of Melitopol the most important stiatesic German de fense center barring the ap proaches to thc Crimea alonthc lower course of Iho Dnieper The major victory climaxing days of bitter seasaw street bat tles threatened with entrapment the Irth German army of 500000 lo 1000000 men defending the Crimea and the territory extend ing vosuvard to the month of thc Dnieper The nazis lost more than 20 000 killed in their futile buildinMo buildmg defense of the town the announcement said German Troops Apparently Groggy EDDY GUMOKE Moscow red army speeding up its marathon offen sive and attacking violently in many sectors was throwing the Germans bad scores of miles Sat urday in the face ot very heavy overall cost of living had risen almost 25 per cent since January 3041 and that foorl costs alone had gone up more than 40 per cent Thc resolution concluded Resolved That the increase in wages recommended by the em ergency board be rojeelrd and the subject matter be referred to 1 membership in the form of a strike ballot for their considera tion of the findings of the emer gency board and the recommenda tions for further procedure in an effort to obtain a satisfactory sct tlemerit of our wage demands The operating unions are the Locomotive Engineers Locomotive firemen and Enginemen Concluc and Switchmen Normally vehicles and in firepower the infantry division so is made up f about 15000 men The unofficial but authoritative army and navy register reporting a sweeping reorganization ot army troop units said Saturday that tnc motorized divisions viii eliminated a separate oruan Infantry divisions henceforth will be transported by trnrp transpori batliilions Armored di visions in thc future will have lank and 3 armored infantry bat talion uith increased artillery strength Thc register said the der dalcd Oct IB provided fo a newtype of light division for ampmbious airborne mountain and jungle fighting Tiie light di visions will lay stress on lich weapons and will approximate an infanlry unit in firepower Weather Report FORECAST iMasou City Not much change in Icinpcrature Saturday after noon Saturday night and Sun day forenoon showers late Sat urday night and Sunday fore noon Iowa Rain Saturday night fol lowed by showers and thunder storms Sunday forenoon warmer east portion Saturday niKht all temperatures above freezing Minnesota Warmer sm central and little chance pciaturc extreme north portion Saturday inshl and Sunday fnrcnoon Occasional rain souih portion IN MASON CITY I GlobcGazcttc weather Maximum Fridav Minimum Friday niaht At 8 a m Saturday YKAR AGO Maximum Minimum FUNERAL PROCESSION Notre Dame Illinois 1 icctly behind the body o his friend and coworker i the state government Behind the governor Uenrv B m Allison speaker of the Iowa house of representatives ctn Jo the lett of Mr Andersen in the picture is Rov who was in charge of the Masonic vite nt thV More than 900 persons attended theservices eluding members of thc Mason Elks Lions 20th Cen tun club and school board which attended in ekjMoto Kayonay engraving Circus Actor Meets Death in Hanging Himself Act west thc audience as thc only man who hangs himself and lives to tell thc story the veteran performer jumped from the platform and was snapped 20 feet into the air as the rope1 stretched its length Instead of acknowledging the ap plause Peters lifeless in ess n rnidiir having reached the end of the firemens and thrill circii Peters a 4i year old civus veti Js cran climbed to the 70 loot bal ambulance cony for iiis usual finale after performing various nets for the SG27 opcninsiiifliit spec tators Knotting a rope made of strands of rubber covered with canvas around his neck Peters prepared to leap After being announced to rushd l lushed the per uii Deaconess hospital where he was pronounced dead Ihe lifesavin trick of thc act circus attendants explained is to Krab thc resilient rope just be fore it becomes taut and take the snap with your hands instead of your neck They said spectators seldom notice the movement in the excitement of thc act Ernie Young who has booked Peters for 20 years said that his friend was trying out a new rope am was perfoiniiiiB his act from a height 25 feet greater than usual Moving believed that Peters grabbed the rope but counterattacks There were sipns from several simthcast of Kremcnchug in the Dnieper el bow both north and south of Mclilopol where thc Russians arc fashioningthe southern arm of a clamp am southeast of Kiev al the Percyaslav bridffc the German com mand was unable lo halt break throughs London dispatches said possi bly ir0000n Germans were threatened with entrapment in the Dnieper bend in the Crimea and around Kiev and Cornel Heretofore by the use of troops masses of artillery and heavy umis of tanks and bombers Ihc naxis generally have succeeded in slowing down thc Soviets after n major breakthrough but Satur day the German line nllhouh similarly reinforced appeared to be crumbling This is the first lime that thc Ocrinaiuhave iiart a real war of attrition practiced on them over a front and Marshal losef Stalin as Ihc master Russian strategist aniicarcd to have them KTOKSJ At present he red army is striking first in this sector and then in another straining the already thin line of German communica tions to shift me and material to meet the sudden attacks Early in the week the Germans main task seemed lo bc to halt ilh and j pl thc red armys majoi in ternI breakthrough in As il appeared lo the Germans lhat the biR objective was in the Dnieper bond Hie ftussinns sud denly struck out uiih fresh vio lence norlh and south ot Melitopol lo the south When ihe Germans shifted troops from the Crimea to meet this threat the Russians next at tacked south of Tercyaslav where it looks as if they had scored an other important bvenkthrouflh The Russians arc driving hard m Ihc direction of the important iron nrc city of Krivoi Rng and arc within 15 miles of that ob jective inside the Dnieper cl how Other soviet nnils branch niK out to the northwest have reached o within IK mjics nf Ananirnka rail crossing on vital lines from Kiev to the Crimea and thc Black sea point of Nikolacv At ihe other end of lie more than r0 mile wide wedae which the Kufsians have driveli vilhin the rivers bend lied Star said the riuMiiiis were attacking an im portant enemy position proleilina Ijncpinozciyhinsk and had closed to viUni 3 f hc tcn lf Ihe IMK inctalUnfiical ccnler nf Dnicpropctrovsk at thc river bend Red Star said that the soviet ihriist had encircled several basic points in the Vcrkhnednyeprovsk area 31 miles northwest of Dnie propetrovsk and lhat the Ger mans were in panic Thc newest Russian MKXCSCS cut the railway between Dnicpro pctrovsk and Krivoi Roc and the Germans have only one line out statistics 40 Dnepropetrovsk that which P Purdue FINAL grnoucc Ihe rope but llnf ii UKU lacked Ihe resilience Kosio N W Ohio State FINAL Army Yale TINAL   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication