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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 18, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 18, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             OF NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL L THE NEWSrAPEk THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS Associated Press and United Press Full Lused Wires Five Cents a Capyi MASON CITV IOWA MONDAY OCTOBER 18 1913 his Paper Consists ot Two One NO 3 TOWNS TAKEN IN ALLIED ADVANCE Flying Forts Smash at Germans Again FAST MOSQUITO BOMBERS MAKE RAID ON BERLIN Allied Flyers Renew Extensive Activities Against Nazi Europe London flying fortresses smashed in force at nazi Europe again Monday in pac ing the renewal of the allied air offensive which sent traffic over the channel soaring to a high peak ol intensity The 3day lull in the aerial campaign broken Sunday night by light British mosquito bombers which made one of their periodical nuisance and reconnaissance thrusts at Berlin Picking up by daylight a large formation of United States Bth air force fortresses carried out their 1st major operation since the at tack Thursday on Schweinfurt which cost a record high of 60 bombers Watchers on the southeast coast 01 England saw the big Boeings returning from the continent Stragglers were bringing up the rear possibly indicating that the bombers had tangled with Ger man fighters in an air battle of considerable scope A report from the channel area said the sky over the Straits of Dover appeared to be filled with planes which left vapor trails in the bright sunny sky Large forces of allied fighters swept across the channel toward France before the fortresses flejv was at a high pitch Twinengined mosquito bomb ers attacked objectives in west ern Germany as well as Berlin during the night without loss The raid on Berlin was the 84th of the war and the 1st night at tach by the RAF bomber com mand since a similar mosquito raid on Berlin Oct 9 Rounding out the night offen sive other British aircraft laid mines in enemy waters bombed and strafed airfields and railway targets in occupied western Eu rope and hit shipping off the Dutch coast Two barges were sunk off Holland by 1 hurri bomber and Canadianmanned mosquitoes knocked out 7 loco motives All planes returned safely from the moonlight at tacks German planes made another token vuid on London Saturday night and also bombed eastern and southeastern England Alto gether 15 planes crossed the English coast but only a few reached the London area One was shot down A number persons were killed when a bomb demolished 4 houses on an estate near a Lon don football club while at least 2 persons were killed in another London area Rescue squads dug in the wreckage of bombed dwell ing for several counted for persons unac 3rd in Iowa Family Dies From Explosion of Gasoline Stove Fairfield The death o Mrs Chester Roraick 30 brough lo 3 Sunday the toll in the Romick family from the explosion of a gasoline stove in their cabin near here Two daughters Ava Marie 9 and Verna Leola 3 died at th lime of the blast Saturday A coroners inquest is expected to be held sometime this week Funeral services for the mothei and daughters were held Monday MrsHarry Bamberger a neigh bor who was in the cabin and who also was burned has a fighting chance for recovery attendants said Mrs Romicks son Elvin 11 was painfully burned but was dis missed from a hospital Sunday 8 Killed as 2 Blimps Collide Over Ocean Philadelphia navy searched the Atlantic off Barnc gat Light N J Monday for the bodies of 2 of the 8 men killed in the collision of 2 blimps from the Lakehurst naval air station Six bodies have been recovered The blimps 1 on a military mission and the other on a training flight collided in a zero ceiling One fell into the sea white the other made its wny back lo Lakehurst Schilling Local Attorney Succumbs to Heart Attack 1C GRIM THREAT TO NEW GUINEA skull and crossed bones being painted on the tail of T4ie Eager Beaver a U S heavy bomber by Sgt L Baer Brooklyn is no empty boast The plane is the 2nd oldest in service in New Guinea has accounted for 3 Jap zeros 2 cargo vessels and 1 destroyer and had completed 69 missions when this photo was taken Says Army Contract Officer Granted Erroneous Comptroller General Opposes Proposal by War Department Washington War ren comptroller general told the house military committee Mon day that army contracting offi cers had allowed hundreds of erroneous contractors claims in cluding charges for such items as false teeth liquor and juke boxes Warren opposed legislation requested by the war depart ment to Rive its contracting of ficers final and conclusive jur isdiction in settling terminated war contracts He cited 270 cases in which he said claims allowed by the officers had been ques tioned by the general account ing office and recoveries made from the contractors W a r department regulations covering the settlements he told the committee have all the ap pearance of having been put for ward by special pleaders for in dustry Untold billions of dollars are involved in contract settlements he declared and the question is whether congress shall permit the bypassing of the general accounting office in their settle employes wife to n hospital in maternity case 51743000 representing the amount a contractor failed to credit the government following a price reduction on material 5211621 charged for truck rent al when the same trucks for the same period already had been charged for on another voucher The cost of vitamin pills as part of a contract charge A charge for the services of 1 employe for 41 hours in a single day v representing exces sive cost of armor plate S2G3OOfl paid by an employer to his employes in the form of a special Christmas bonus Yet the war department says we are bound by the certificate of the contracting officer in these cases Wanen commented Now heres a sweet one he continued explaining that a contracting officer had ap proved a paymentof S2Z5 for a spare set of false teeth for a contractors employe going to Russia Other items approved by con tracting officers the comptroller said included charges of SI500 each for 191B model Liberlj trucks si600 for 1928 mode dump trucks md 52000 for 191L i model steam rollers merit What is proposed and is now i One contractor Warren siicl actually being done is an arro1 contributed to a local communilv gant snapping of lingers in the face of congress Warren testi fied In the national interest he said heatedly the war depart ment should be peremptorily stopped in its present contract settlement procedures which he said amazed and astounded him I measure my words when I solemnly warn you that these regulations will permit a grand cover Warren continued and will absolutely preclude any chance to detect frauds chest campaign nnd was hailed by the press as a paragon of gen erosity but the charged to the government anc allowed by the contracting officer Sault Ste Marie Digs Out of Foot of Snow Sault Sic Marie Out if Sault Ste Marie and district dug out from a 124 inch blanket o snow Monday after the heavies fall since November 19N Th snow fell since Saturday night In some instances Warren said Dl highway traffic was main the regulations will be actually Inincri boh in the city and sur used to cover up frauds and will i rounding area encourage extreme generosity willi government funds The practice of some contract ins officers of 104 Nippon Planes Are Shot Down Allied Headquarters in the Southwest Pacific air Tien have blasted prob ibly planes out of the apanesc air force in the southwest acific In a series of brilliant victories ridjiy and Saturday announced Monday Lt Gen George C Ken reys flyers shot down 82 planes ind destroyed 12 on the ground Twentyfour more probably were ihot down and 19 probably dc RUSSIANS ROLL FORWARD IN 2 FRESH ATTACKS Clinch Hold on Both Banks of Dnieper Threaten Nazi Front By HENRY C CASSIDY Moscow The red arinv itroyed or damaged oil the ncw offensives s west ofthe Dnieper river Monday round The most 1sided victory was scored over New Guineas Oro bay Friday The Japanese lost 26 bombers and 20 fighters and probably 11 other aircraft Not 1 allied plane was missing though some were damaged Apparently seeking to emulate he allies recent punishing raid on Rabaul New Britain the Japanese sent approximately 62 combers and fighters against Oro Day Their divebombers cnme ill customary surprise tactic the surprise was on the Japanese American fighters in P38s intercepted the first wave and then P40s came roaring into the battle Dogfights rageti from altitudes of 100 feet to 23000 feet The enemy found it impossible io get through to allied shipping in he bny And when those still in the air gave up and streaked for home they found it nearjy impos sible to escape Allied fighters pursued them all the way to New Britain General MacArthurs commu nique said thebig force of enemy planes was virtually annihilated The same day the Japanese 1S bombers and 12 Sight tfs against Finschhafen A small formation of P40s intercepted and shot 5 bombers and a fighter and probably got 3 more fighters Again all allied planes returned Saturday Mitchell bombers covered by fighters swept in over and the adjoining Boram airdrome at treetop height de stroying 6 bombers and 4 fighters on the ground and destroying or badly damaging 12 other bombers One Mitchell was destroyed by antiaircraft fire but accompany ing fighters shot down 16 of 20 to 30 intercepting enemy fighters and probably destroyed 3 others Sixteen Japanese fighters out or 30 to 40 that attempted to in tercept allied raiders on Madanj the same day were shot down Seven were listed as probables and 2 were destroyed on the ground One allied plane failed to return M o D d a ys communique said nothing about the progress of Aus tralian troops advancing upon the Japanese base at Madang o clinch its hold on both banks of the river and threaten the dis ntegration of Die entire German rout Battlelinc dispatches saitl soviet forces were pourinjr through a widening gap made Sunday in the German defenses inside the Dnieper bend in the Kremenchug sector behind Dnepropetrovsk An important new bridgehead was simultane ously established north of Kiev by a crossing of the Dnieper in the Gomel sector and the cap ture of Loev Red army troops consolidated this bridgehead Monday and imshed forward against furious German resistance Both drives menaced the Ukrainian capital of Kiev with en circlement The Soviets meanwhile re ported encountering German re brought from Poland France the Netherlands nnd Den mark but added that they were pushing forward irresistibly The Russians now hold 4 main bridgeheads west of the Dnieper Two below Kiev in the Pereyaslav and Kremenchug sectors and above Kiev 1 immediately north of tht cityand the other 100 miles to the north in the Loev sector The communist parly organ Prowia disclosed the origina crossings were made as soon the Russians reached the iivei without waiting for reserves sup ply bases or engineering equip ment to move up The newspapci added that these forces were nou in a position to press nllout of fensives from completely cquippcd bases on ihe west bank The drive in the Kremesi chug sector along a 28mile front began with a 2hour ar tillery barrage followed by in fantry and tank assaults at 7 a m on Oct 13 after the ad vance guards had first passed the Dnieper A red army communique said soviet troops had pressed forwarc to capture a enemy strongpoinls including the town of Opelnos toyc 30 miles southeast o Krem enchug After reporting a big detach ing movement on the eastern front Sunday the Germans in their sa takin Funeral Services Wednesday Afternoon at Central Church Emil W Schilling 35 attorney died suddenly of heart disease Sunday afternoon at oclock at a local hospital where he had been taken Sunday morning He had made a business trip to Wa terloo Saturday and was prepar ing for church Sunday morning when he suffered an attack and wis taken to the hospital Mr Schilling was born Doc 18 1887 at Plymouth the son ot Mr and Mrs Julius Schilling of that community His father died in 1928 and his mother in 1927 One brother Albert Schilling also preceded him in death Mr Schilling moved to Mason City with his parents when a small boy Heattended Mason City schools and was graduated by Russell from the local high school after which he received a degree from Tolands business college in Mil son City He was for 8 years an in structor at the Hamilton school of commerce In Mason City and taught 1 year at Gates business college ul Webster City He was vice president of Schanke ami company for 9 years dur ing which period he studied law and received a degree from the Blackstonc Law Institute Chicago He was admitted to the bar in 1924 He practiced law for 19 years in this com munity with offices in the For esters building Mr Schilling was married Aug 5 1914 to Miss Clara Halweg who survives him Also survivin K W SCHILLING and the area west of Smolensk They also reported heavy defen sive fighting in the Krcmcnchug sector The naris called the fight ing in the Velikic Lukie sector savage but said soviet attempts willing and din ing nnd fraternizing socially with contractors Wanen said has a tendency to make them more liberal Some of the items listed by Warren as allowed by contracting officers and questioned by the general accounting office with recoveries from contractors in most cases included S35I5166 rep resenting the purchase price of materials that did not meet spec ifications The cost of flowers sent to fu nerals of employes families 527347 in profits by a con tractor for operation of a cafe teria i in insurance premiums Buy Mar Savings Bonds and ion group insurance SUmps from your GlobeGazette Charges transporting an cm carrier boy ployes dog and forsendinE an i State Guard Gets 1 1 Trucks for Transport DCS Sloincs The Iowa state has requisitioned 11 routes trucks from the federal governI ment to be used as transport vc hiclcs Col Arthur Wallace said Monday The trucks will be used lo transpal state guard members in case of emergencies In the past privately owned cars have been used Colonel Wallace said firein a successful foray Size of the attack was not dis closed but it was the first which amounted lo more then patrol caliber since Admiral Lord Louis Montbatien new southeast Aia commander arrived in the far least to prepare for an offensive to drive the Japanese from Burma I Royal air force planes helped the ground forces in attacks ex panding through Sunday Bomb ers raided Akyab and enemyop erated rail and water supply IOWAVS DOWN PLANES Somewhere in New Guinea Oct lowans each knocked down 1 Jap plane when allied fighter pilots partici pated in a great aerial battle yes terday in which If enemy ships were shot down The lowiins are 2nd Lt Donald Y King Cedar Rapids and 2nd Lt James M Mal loy Muscatinc Senator Caraway Pleads for U S School Aid Washington Car away DArk Monday appealed for senate passage of legislation authorizing 5300000000 in federal grants to public schools In one of her rare speeches the only woman senator told her colleagues that 110 schools in her home state had closed because of inability to obtain qualified teachers and 200 others will be unable to operate for normal terms because ot a shortage of funds eir daily communique Monday id violent soviet attacks1 were place in the Gomel sector at a breakthrough were frus Exchange of U S and jap Nationals Will Take Place Tuesday Mormugao Portuguese India American consulate an nounced Monday that the ex change of American and Japanese BRITISH ATTACK AT MAUNGDAW Launch First Thrust of Offensive in Burma BCNITED PRESS British troops were disclosed Monday to have launched the first thrust of the allied offensive against Burma with nn attack on Japanese forces at Maungdaw A New Delhi communique said the nttack started Saturday night under cover of aerial patrols and that Maungdaw 60 miles above Nationals aboard the liners Teia Akyab was blasted with mortar Maru and Gripsholm will take place Tuesday beginning at 8 a in The announcement was made by the consulate after a confer ence with Japanese authorities while the expectant repatriates hung over the rails of the 2 vessels largely awaiting their transfer It was explained that the Japa nese had asked 1 days delay in the exchange to enable them lo finish arrangements for accoin odating their nationals For the Americans it was a 1 day postponement of the holiday they had been awaiting i months and they wcie frantically cagcr to get aboard the Gripsholm to en joy the cheeses meals and sweets which have been the principal shortage during the internment and trip aboard the Japanese ship AngloU S Lend Treaty With Reds to Be Signed London new Anglo American lencllcase agreement with Russia will be signed here Tuesday with Canada joining for the 1st time in signing the aid 17 OF ALABAMAS 81 MINES OPEN 80 Per Cent of Miners Fail to Heed Appeals Birmingham Ala teen of Alabamas 81 union mines were reopened Monday but a survey of the coal fields indiculcd at least KO per cent of the 22000 idle miners had failed to heed the returntowork plea from John L Lewis president of the United Mine Workers of America The list of operating mines in cluded the big dolomite shaft of the Woodward Iron Co with 550 men and the Bradford slope of Alabama ByProducts Corp with 500 Other captive workings were idle They supply coal for the FuelShy Irgn and Steel mills here Despite slowness of the backlo work movement one coal operator suggested that this is the usual picture afler a strike and on the whole the picture is hhpeful All Alabama union mines had been idle over the weekend The miners walked out beginning last Wednesday when Secretary ickes returned the mines to llieir own ers saying Ihcy had no contract with the operators as their work agreement had been made with the government The walkout was not authorized by the TJMW John 1 Hanralty international representative lo UMW predicted a growing march back to the He said he did not know of any local union in session Sun day which voted against returninj lo work NO RUSH TO OBSERVE PLEA IN INDIANA Terra Haute Ind struggled back to work at 2 of In dianas closed coal shafts Monday but there was no rush to obey the resumeproduction plea of John L Lewis United Mine Workers president Less than onethird of Ihe nor mal opeiations force of about fiOO reported at Kings mine of the Princeton Mining est in Indiana However State Labor Commis sioner Thomas R Hutson snid Indianapolis that advices from his observers in the conl fields indi cated nil 17 shafts which closet last Aveck would be operating by Tuesday morning aie ling a brother Henry F Schil Fayette and 2 sisters Mrs Theresa Johnson of San Diego Cal and Mrs Albert Schmidt Grafton Mr Schilling was a member ot the Cervo Gordo Bar association and a member of the council o the Central church o which lie was a charter member and had served as a trustee choii member and in other capacities Funernl services will be held at the Central Lutheran churcl at 4 oclock Wednesday afternoon with the Rev M O Lee in charge The body will lie in slate at the home at 323 6th street southeas from 2 p m Tuesday until 11 oclock Wednesday n o o n which time it will be taken to the church where it will lie in state until 3 oclock in the after noon Burial will be in Elmwood Funeral arrangements are ir charge of the Major funeral home Were Getting Upper Hand Arnold Says Washington Arnold chief II of the army H When buying n pack of cfearcts contribute 5c to Cicarels for Servicemen lo buy pack for a man in service overseas Weather Report agreement which be nouncccl simultaneously in Lon don and Washington 5TH ARMY GAIN IS MADE AFTER HEAVYFIGHTING Battle of MerryGo Round Nature When Formations Stab Deeply By NOLAND NORGAARD Allied Headquarters Aiders Gen Mark W Clarks 5th umy in slashing giveandtake battle lias driven beyond the Vol urivo and firmly occupied the owns Oinccllo Ruviano and Nerrone British 8th army patrols ire stabbing westward into the fXpenninc backside toward Rome illicd headquarters announced Monday Important new allied landings of men and material in recent days have been made on the Ital ian mainland as a part of the steady reinforcement ot Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers forces it was disclosed From both the 5th and 8th army fronts came reports ot numerous Ores in the enemy rear areas This pointed to the possibility that the Germans were destroying supply dumps preparatory to n general withdrawal although there was nothing else to indicate that fur ther allied advances toward the Italian capital from any direction would be made except in the face he most stubborn opposition General C1 a r ks American veterans ot Salerno captured the towns of Nerrone and Ru viano in the high ground domi nating the surrounding low lands after fierce merrygo round fighting in which strong formations from each side re peatedly stabbed deep into the opposing lines creating a fluid situation an area 5 or E miles deep in which units fre quently became isolated British troops occupied Cancel lo importantaxis xair base 8 miles inland and on the north bank of the Volturno river after beating back a massive Ger man counterattack in the course of an advance from the sea It was in that seclor that Brit ish amphibious forces had landed along the Gulf of Gaeta to flank thc German anchor at Hie mouth of the Volluruo The United States troops beat off strong German counter thrusts before battling their way into Nerronc a strategic moun tain stronghold 3 miles northof the river and 22 miles inland Ruviann another valuable position ii hiffh ground in the strategic elbow of the Volturno where it turns northward cc incnted allied control of an area where the allies already had seized Caiazzo and Ambrosi on opposite sides of he river It also was captured after a sharp engagement On the 8th army front righting raged in the streets ot Montecil fone when British patrols entered and found it heavily garrisoned by Germans The British pntrois broke through toward the main British lines only after a violent encounter Monlecilfonc is 10 miles southwest of Tcrmoli on the Aclriiictic coast nncl 4 miles west Guglionesi the last re ported limit of the British ad vance in thai sector Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers communique said the British 8tli army patrols weze maintaining contact with the enemy in the drive west of the TermoliVinch forces speaking as if in reply H discussion of the loss of 60 American bombers over Schwein furt Germany asserted Monday the loss was incidental and added Were getting the upper hand in every theater in this war Now iloul conclude that tlic wiir is going to be over soon or that its about over or any IhiiiR of ihe kind But thit lie are Kellinc the upper Iiaml is clear Arnold said Gerinmiy he said is desperately turning every effort toward fight defend against growing I road ami field reports said allied bombing Japan now has her 5th or Btli team in Ihe air over the soiuh FORECAST Mason City Warmer Monday aft ernoon and Monday night Con tinued warm Tuesday forenoon Rain beginning Tuesday fore noon Iowa Slightly warmer Monday night continued warm Tuesday forenoon all temperatures i nbovc freezing i Minnesota Not quite so cold vidcd t broad review ilie wir norhwcst little change in in the air His dissertation was peratiirc south and cast portions pegged however to the big Unit enemy resistance was increasing n intensity all along that Iront Allied air forces kept up their steady hammering of the ene my both bombers and fighters attacking communications Sun day Sunday night bridges south of Uomc and the cast coast rail commentators were admitted by vvay ncar Pcscara were bombed west Pacific The general arranged a press conference to which half a hun dred Washington reporters news executives columnists and radio special invitation only Rceardless of our losses Arnold declared Im ready to spud over replacement crews for every one at the same time keep up our strength Arnold spoke for ieirly an hour interrupted only occasion ally by a question iud lie pro and Tuesday Monday night forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 6V Minimum Sunday night 11 At 8 a m Monday g YEAR AGO Maximum 73 Minimum 32 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday AX Minimum Saturday night 20 At 8 a m Sunday v 2i YEAR AGO Maximum 7n Minimum u ed States 8h army njr force ruict Oct 14 on Schwcinfuit in which 60 big bombers went down car rying 593 crew members ami at an estimated plane loss in dol lars of S18000000 You cant run a war OH a dollar basis the general expos tulated one point But he added looking about the room if you want to put it on that basis consider the dollars lost in what we destroy The main objective of the allied air war over Europe Ar nold said is to make it easier for ground troops lo go in in the final dash and sands of lives Sundays air attacks were car ried out dcspilc unfavorable weather Medium bombers attacked Alife on the highway above Capua Jn daylight Sunday fighters made sweeps up the east coast toward Anconn 130 miles northwest of Tcrmoli hitting ihe constal rail way and knocking out trains and motor transport Three aircraft were listed as missing from ail operations Two locomotives and a number of railway cars were shot up in the raids toward Ancona In other sweeps up the Adriatic coast warhawks scored direct hits on a bridge south of Caramanico southwest of Chieti Air force headquarters an nounced that the Germans hart lost more than 6500 aircraft in the Mediterranean in the II months since the allies landed in Xorth Africa The official sUle ment said 1245 axis planes hid been found on airfields in Italy most of them smashed by allied raids Of the abandoned planes 697 save thoui were German anrl 566 were Ital ian   

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