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Mason City Globe Gazette: Friday, August 27, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 27, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OtPARTMEHT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVCS MOiNtS U THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XUX HOME EDITION iTTTTTTl ASSOCIATED PUSS AMD UKttED PRESS FU1J UASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY AUGUST 27 1943 NO 276 YANKS HIT NEW CUINEA SUPPLY LINE Reds Give French More Recognition Than U S Britain r BaiEVE UNITY TO BE AIDED BY ALLIED ACTIONS Qualifications by U S Britain Reportedly Based on De Gaulle View Washington soviet unions unqualified recognition of the French committee of National Liberation Friday overshadowed the limited recognition granted by the United States Great Brit ain and Canada Secretary of State Cordell Hull however said at his news con ference that recognition of the committee by the major allied powers affords a sound basis for a thoroughly happy and satisfac tory collaboration on a steadily expanding basis He said informa tion from Algiers shows that lead ers of the committee are pleased and happy with the recognition accorded it The Russian action recogniz ing the committee as represen tative of the state interests of the French republic and pledging to exchange plenipotentiary repre sentatives was not a surprise Soviet officials for some time have been pressing for allied recognition of the French com mittee jointly headed by Gen Charles De Gaulle and Gen Henri Honore Girand The Rus sians had recognized De Gaulles fighting French organization and ft had been anticipated that they would to farther than the western allies which theydid Frenchmen here and abroad expressed gratification at the AngloAmerican action although there were private observations that it seemed unnecessarily in volved Qualified and sharp in tone American and British displeas ure at the activities of De Gaulle who has become the dominant personality in the French com mittee was behind the qualifica tions The statements make it plain that efforts to obtain De Gaulles cooperation along tiie lines desired by American and British leaders have not been suc cessful and that more complete recognition will be withheld until a greater degree of conformity is achieved The success of such a policy will not be determined immedi ately The qualifications will make it possible to withdraw or nullify recognition from the French committee if it adopts a course not approved by the United States and Great Britain But even limited Anglo American recognition was ex pected to advance the cause of French unity and to submerge the factionalism which has plagued Frenchmen every where since the fall of France First evidence of that was an nouncement that the fighting French delegation here would abandon that designation and that henceforth there would be a single representation That theory was also borne out in Algiers where Rene Massigii committee commissioner said too much emphasis should not be put on the restrictions because rec ognition itself was the important thing The essential thing is that it forms a basis for the future work of liberation and I am happy to see references to liberation in the Massigii said They are to be examined not for holes but as constituting a basis for sin cere cooperation The Russian action was inter preted here as blanket indorse ment of the committee as a de facto government It saidnothing about a future French govern ment alter France itseU is eratcd In contrast the British and American statements both recog nized with sympathy the com mittees desire to be regarded as the group qualified to insure the administration and defense of all French interests but added The United extent to which it may be possible to give effect to this desire must however be reserved for consid eration in each case as it arises Great is the inten tion of His Majestys government to give effect to this request as far as possible while reserving the right to consider in consultation with the committee the practical application of this principal in oarticular cases as they arise MOUNTBATTENS ZONE OF arrow indicates expected drive by allied troops to free Burma of Japanese domination a sequel to appointment of Lord Louis Mountbatten British commando chief as supreme allied commander in southeast Asia Shaded area is Japanese dominated The assault is expected to come from India A where allied troops are based Mountbatten U S Military Chiefs Outline Squeeze Play 4 Objectives in Drive From Base of India Dominate Discussions Washington eastern end of a BritishAmericanChi nese squeeze play against japan of the Quebec war strategy being out lined h ertr a t meetings between Lord Louis Mountbatten new al lied supreme commander in southeast Asiaand American military chiefs The itinerary of Britains famed commando chief will take him through a round of staff conferences with army and war department officials Fri day and after a trip to London eventually to Chungking to plot the western phase of the war in Asia A 4fold objective appeared to dominate the developing pattern for the allied effort in Asia Re open the Burma road unshackle southern Asiatic seaports from enemy control and ultimately dominate the China sea and greatly augment allied air power in China itself With the whole program ob viously involving amphibious op erations Mountbatten conferred Thursday with navy officials Secretary of the Navy Knox re marked that the choice of Lord Louis was an indication of grow ing attention and interest to the southeastern Asia theater and to future operations there Speculation turned mean while on the identity of the American army officers will serveunder him It became known that an as yet unidenti fied officer already has been chosen by the commando leader as his deputychief of staff attd that the chief of staff will be British The name most frequently mentioned lor the deputys job is that of Lt Gen Mark W Clark former chief of staff of the army ground forces now commanding the U S 5th army in north Af rica one of this countrys youngest and most brilliant generals who won fame for his submarine trip to north Africa for conferences with French leaders before the in vasion lust November 10 SUBS SUNK OR DAMAGED 13 AirSea Battles in Atlantic Reported New York least 10 Ger man Uboats were sunk or dam aged recently in 13 airsea battles between U Ex army air forces B 24 bombers patroling far out into the ocean the AAFs antt sub marine command announced Fri First Lady in kew Zealand on Hospital and Camp Tour Mrs Roosevelt Voices Message of Good Luck Thanks to Service Men Auckland N 2 Ileanor Roosevelt has arrived in Zealand on a tour of Ameri can military hospitals and camps n the Pacific theater it dis closed Friday Mrs Roosevelt told a press ton erenire she had a very pleasant longest of tier many ourneys as the first countering good weather all the way Mrs Roosevelt said she brought from the president a message of iooii luck and thanks to the serv ce men throughout the Pacific observations confirmed an in timation that hey are doing a rand job she said Her arrival look most of New Zealand by surprise since only 12 days ago she helped her hus band entertain Prime minister Churchill and his daughter Mary at the Roosevelt estate at Hyde Park N Y some 10 000 miles away Though there was no official announcement of her mode of travel it was obvious that she flew to New Zealand Responding to a speech of wel come by Walter Nash New Zea lands minister to Washington Mrs Roosevelt said she brought the presidents greetings I know hed like to be here with me she said Long ago you were kind enough to ask me to sec the work ol the women of New Zealand It is a great privi lege Last autumn I saw the work ofthe British women andIanx pleased now to sec achieve MRS ROOSEVELT ments1 Mrs Roosevelt also expressed day The antisubmarine command said 5 submarines were believed to have been sunk and 5 damaged and 3 were forced under water and thereby prevented from at tacking nearby allied shipping None ol these battles lias been reported previously the anti submarine command said B24s specially equipped for antisubmarine warfare flew as far as 1000 miles from their home bases to battle the submarines the command said and air returned safely although 5 ot them were subjected to severe antiaircraft fire from the Uboats Five crew members in one plane were wounded when an ex plosive shell smashed through the nose the commands formal statement read The same shell shattered flight instruments the hydraulic system and other vital parts of the aircraft but the pilot managed a safe landing at his base The statement did not say how many planes were involved in the jfights and gave no dales pleasure at the opportunity to see so many American soldiers and sailors so far from home Many mothers and wives in the United States are grateful lor the hospitality shown the boys she said We feel you have done a great deal and we alreadv know you well She also was welcomed by Gov Gen Air Marshal Sir Cyril Newall Prime Minister Peter Fraser and other high ranking officials After the brief welcoming cere mony she boarded a train for Wellington the capital She plans to tour hospitals and camps in the Pacific area including Australia as well as inspect womens war work She said she would make a further statement after seeing the activities of New Zealand I women The trip to New Zealand marks the first time that Mrs Koosevelt has left the United States since she accompanied the president on a brief visit to Mexico last spring The trip was twice as far across than 6000 her flight to Britain on Oct 23 1942 as guest of King George V and Queen Elizabeth On that oc casion she visited American army camps and other military and naval installations throughout the ARRIVES IN U gWearing immaculate whites Vice Ad miral tort Louis Monntbatlen British commando chief and newly appointed supreme allied commander in the southwest Pacific steps from a transport plane from which he harried away to confer with Admiral Ernest J V S navy chief in Washington Nazis Invasion of Italy Not Imminent London German over seas radio said Friday that in formation available from the cen tral Mediterranean does not indi cate imminent invasion of the Italian mainland by the allies The broadcast recorded by the Associated Press added that ac cording to present observations allied shipping in the central Med iterranean cannot be described as particularly intensive Buy War Savings Bonds and SUmps from year GlobeGazette carrier British isles and returnee Washington Nov 17 to WELLES SAYS HE HAS QUIT Undersecretary Sends Letters to Ambassadors Washington UR5 S u m n e r Welles has informed ambassadors of foreign countries here that President Roosevelt has accepted his resignation a s undcrsec retary of state it was learned Friday Welies now at Bar Harbor Me conveyed the news of bis r e s i g n a lo be formerly a n nounced by the while house r in enghyPer sonal letters to the various members of the diplo matic corps with whom he had been associated during his long career in the state department The letters were dated Aug 22 I day before issuance of an an RYTI WARNED BY FINNISH CHIEFS Political Leaders Urge Move for Peace Stockholm politi cal leaders advocating moves for a separate peace witli Russia have warned President Risto Ryti tha Finland is sliding toward a dan gerous path the Finnish govern merit progressive de terioratibn of relations with the United States recently has pro duccd especially great concern among the people said a petition submitted 10 days ago to Ryti b members of various political par ties In a surprise move the Finnisl government summoned foreign correspondents shortly before midnight Thursday night to re lease for the first time the lex of the petition It was reported 6 days ago tha the group asked Ryti to invest gate the possibilities of a separate peace but the Finnish governmen clamped a tight censorship on do tails ol the appeal KEY AIRDROMES N ITALY AGAIN HIT IN ATTACKS Flying Fartresses Smash Capua Fields 19 Enemy Craft Downed Allied Headquarters in North Ifrica States heavy nd medium bombers in strong orce renewed their assault on ne Italian peninsula Thursday vith a set of scorching attacks on ey airdromes Flying fortresses mashed the Capua airfields and marauders raided the aerial in tallations at Grazzanise numbers of dispersed planes on the target fields were hit and 15 enemy fighters were destroyed in stiff running bat tles Enemy planes shot down in the 21hour cycle up to Fri day morning totaled W allied headquarters announced While the fortresses hit Capua 17 miles north of Naples on a line and the marauders vis ted Grazzanise in the vicinity ot Sweden Drafts Protest to Nazis Over Sinking of 2 Fishing Boats Stockholm IP The Swedish foreign office announced Friday that a protest to the German gov ernment was being drafted shortl after a communique stated 2 Ger man minesweepers had sunk Swedish fishing boats withou warning The latest protest the 2nd in I days demanding that German halt her attacks on Swedish com mercial and military interest win be presented shortly it wa said The 12 crew members aboar the 2 boats were presumed have been lost in the attack o 5 Swedish craft in internationa waters off the northwest coast o Denmark 2 days ago The incident followed a form protest Aug 18 against the firin upon a Swedish naval torped boat and air force plane by Ger man gunners aboard a Norwegia freighter off the Swedish coas Aug 6 A communique said an invest gallon has been launched by th navy and that the Swedish lega tion in Berlin has been asked t learn from the Germans whethe any of the 12 men reported t nouncemcnt by Welles an state de partment office that he would be out of town for a few days Later it was reported that Welles was resting in Bar Harbor have been on were rescued Naples carried RAF Wellingtons also out night operations in the suburbs of Naples roaring over Bagnoli again with block busters In oilier widespread operations over Sardinia warhawks strafec jower lines motor transport anc Buildingsand destroyed 3 planes on the ground near Guspini anc bombed the harbor at Carlofortc Mitchell medium bombers shatTup the railroad junction at Locri and A3S invaders dive bombed eun positions near Reggio Calabria Seven allied planes were miss ing from all operations The continued air onslaugh coincided with announcement o new bombardments of the Italian mainland by British warships anc the enemys 1st serious attack on Algiers in 2i months A few planes penetrated Al gjers defenses dropping bombu in and near the city shortly before dawn Thd damage was officially termed negligible and 3 of the raiders were shot down Then were a few casualties Fortresses escorted by light nings dropped thousands of fragmentation bombs and many tons of high explosives on Capuas airfields in the same pattern of attack which laid waste the master airdrome and its satellites atFoggia the day before Strings of bombs covered the fields dispersal areas Many parked planes were knocked out and 1 hangar was set aflame as many smaller fires blazed up The fortresses and lightnings were attacked by 45 to 50 cncmv fisliters antl the running battle continued trom the target to 25 miles out to sea on the return trip The fortresses knocked down 8 oC the eneniv and the lightnings 4 At the same lime American Mitchells attacked a satellite field and destroyed several air craft on the ground At Locri on the toe the Mitchells scored direct hit on the rail line from Gioia and other hits on tracks and junctions One warhawk pilot on the visit to Gaspini Flight Officer Robert A Bormillion Columbus Ohio said weve been going over Sar dinia almost daily and havent encountered an enemy plane in the air for weeks We did see some on the ground and knocked out several of them ant Stop Reds West of Kharkov Moscow A5 German troops lave struck at the flanks ot Rus ian forces advancing through the Jkraine in an unsuccessful effort o check the red armys progress vest of Kharkov it was an nounced Friday A front line dispatch lo the army newspaper Red Star said the enemy concentrated infan try and tanks alone the sides of salients which the Russians had driven into their lines and launched a number of stiff counterattacks The red army repulsed the al acks the dispatch said and continued the reckless advance which Thursday covered another i miles A German communique iroadcast by Berlin and recorded iy the Associated Press said Rus sian troops supported by tanks and planes attacked south ami west Kharkov Thursday but Were repulsed with the loss of more than 100 tanks The Germans said their troops made a thrust against the flank of red army forces attacking on the Mius front repelling the Rus sians and inflicting heavy losses and halted soviet attacks near Izyum with a series counter blows A Russian attack southwest and west of Orel did not succeed in achieving a breakthrough despite the employment of extra ordinarily strong air forces the nazi bulletin said It added lha altogether 218 Russian tanks were destroyed in Thursday 4 In addition to Thursdays Sji mile westward advance which the Russians made in the Khar kov rcsioK toxvard the nazis Dnieper river defenses soviet forces were disclosed to have struck due south in a new flanking maneuver The southward column of Gen Ivan S Konevys steppe army pounding toward the key vai junction of Lozovaya killed somi 600 of the enemy and destroyet or disabled 22 enemy tanks the soviet communique said Fightinj was reported heavy Thus the steppe army was moving into position to put ever increasing pressure against llv flanks of tlie German lines reach ing eastward into the Donets rivei basin the sunken boat Weather Report Iowa FORECAST Cooler Friday afternoon and Friday night rising tem peratures north and west by Saturday noon Minnesota Cooler in south and east and continued cool in northwest portion Friday night Rising temperature forenoon Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Thursday 76 Minimum Thursday 60 At 8 a m Friday 60 YEAR AGO Maximum 73 JVIinimum 60 Precipitation 02 Kansas City Laundries to Shut Down Thursday Unless Prices Rise Kansas City doing 90 per cent of the Kansas City laundry business will be closed to the public next Thursday un less the OPA allows a 25 per cent increase in their prices asserted J C Johnston spokesman for the operators Thursday Twentyeight of the citys 33 large plants will shut downex cept for fulfilling army navy and hospital contracts Johnston said When we told the OPA we would have to shut down he re lated they asked us to furnish more figures Johnston said costs of labor and supplies had mounted 40 to 150 per cent HANSABAYIS LASHED BY 100 BOMBER CRAFT 2 Freighters and 64 Barges Are Destroyed or Damaged in Attack By BRYDON TAVES Allied Headquarters Southwest 3acific crushing blow by he largest nllied bombing fleet ver assembled in New Guinea eft a huge in the vital Japa icse coastal supply line at Hansa Bay Friday as ground troops icorcd gains at both ends of the iouthcrn Pacilic front Xearly 100 liberators flying fortresses and Mitchells es corted by lightnings blasted llxnsa Bay Wednesday with 180 tons of bombs raking the area for an hour and setting a 5 milelong mass of flames alonr the shore Of 2 freighters and more than H barges destroyed or damaged by allied flyers during the day 1 ship ot between 4500 and 7500 tons and 15 small cargo craft Jell victim The planes met no enemy aircraft and suffered only slight damage from ground fire The 1st definite news from New JeoTgia in more than a week re vealed American troops had seized nost the shoreline of Bairoko Harbor the last Japanese nest on hat central Solomons islands and had hemmed the garrison into a small area of the beach The posi tion represented a 3mile advance The important Hansa Bay link in the enemys Guinea supply route alone the north east coast lies 250 airline miles north anL west of SaJamiua where allied roops edged for ward for indefinitely stated gains lo increase the threat to the stronglyheld airdrome The bombers set huge fires in the bivouac and dump areas at A war and Nubia plantation ad joining Hansa Bay exploded sev eral ammunition dumps silenced enemy gun positions and set blazes along the shore from Condor Point to Nubia 5 miles south Smoke billowed up 3000 leet Mitchells ranged southward 45 miles to strike at the Japanese MOVE ON indicate lionred army drives on the Kharkov front are con verging on Poltava from the north with the capture of Zen kov eclipsing last winters counteroffensive and from the west where the Russian wedge was last reported within JO miles of the new objective Churchill to Go to Washington Next Week Quebec UR Prime Minister Winston Churchill will go to Washington early next week to resume war conferences with President Roosevelt it was an nounced Friday at the citadel When buying a pack of cigarets contribute 5c to Cigarets for Servicemen to buy pack for a in service overseas points iu Crown Prince harbor a n c Friedrich harbor where barges ami luggers were attacked while single planes hit nl Iinseh harbor on Huon peninsula nearer Salamaua Return of all the planes testi fied to the weakening hold oE the Japanese on the New Guinea coast Hansa Bay is the most porlanl enemy transshipment point between the major bases at Madang and Wewak Gen Douglas Mac Arthurs spokesman said American troops near Salamaua met a Japanese force northwest of Koosevelt Ridge between Nassau Bar and the airdrome Last reports of the fighting put strong allied forces a mile from he field A dispatch from newlycaptured Muiida airfield on New Georgia reported that 16 marine corsair flyers took on 60 lo 70 Japanese 7ero fighters and dvvcbombers over Velln Lavella island to the north Tuesday and shot down at least 9 and probably 10 more without loss The attacking planes started some fires on the island occupied recently by American troops in a report on the same raid Gen eral MacArthurs communique said the planes attacked 6 times and lost 12 of their number Between New Georgia and Vella Lavella formation of allied planes Tuesday unloaded 34 Ions of bombs on enemy barge hideouts and gun posi tions near the major base at Vila on Kolombangara island Ouv ground forces arc slowly closing in on the enemy at Bairoko the communique said reporting action through Thurs day Practically all the aerial activity was on Wednesday before a spell of stormy weather disrupted operations Liberators ranging over the Japanese base at Kavieng New Ireland north of New Guinea destroyed a 7000ton freighter with 2 direct hits and 2 near misses with 500pound bombs A surprise strafing raid by longrange beaufighters on John Albert harbor in the Vitu islands resulted in the sinking or dam aging of 19 enemy barges or pa trol boats When baying a pack of cigarets contribute 5c to Cirarets for Senicemen to buy pack for a in service   

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