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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 23, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 23, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HIST03Y AND OES MOiNC THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL XUX MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS WlST HOME EDITION mini MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY AUGUST THIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE J t liJiO cjucoc Of TWO SECTIONS X7 RUSSIANS SEIZE KHARKOV Allied Airmen Smash Salerno DOWN 33 NAZI FIGHTER CRAFT IN AIR BATTLES Day and Night Assaults Leave Railroad Yards a Sea of Flames By RELMAN MORIN Allied Headquarters in North Africa mighty allied aerial juggernaut rolled over Sa lerno another important point in the Italian mainland railroad sys tem virtually smashing the city in day and night raids and leaving marshalling yards a sea ol flame headquarters announced Monday Salerno is on the coast south of Naples around which allied heavy and medium bombers left a trail of ruin in railway centers in raids Friday and Saturday The Germans determined to defend the key points of their lifeline threw in about 100 fighters to battle the marauders and their escort Although Mondays allied head quarters communique said 28 of the enemy fighters were shot down at Salerno later reports placed the number at 33 Alto gether 34 enemy planes were shot down Sunday for a total of 5 al lied aircraft lost In the heavy air fighting of the past 4 days 114 enemy planes have been downed it was stated here The marauder squadrons in their Sunday raid destroyed 31 fighters topping the 22 shot down by these bombers in the Naples area on Saturday While the northwest African forces were slashing at Salerno British liberators and Halifaxes from the middle cast bombed Italian rail switching yards Sat urday at Crotone a port on the arch of the Italian boot The British flyers observed ex plosions and fires some near a chemical factory a Cairo an nouncement said Seven allied aircraft were re ported missing from the Satur day nieht and Sunday raids 2 of them from the middle east force British Wellingtons gave Salerno its initial going over Saturdav night and the American medium bombers returned to the same tar gets in daylight Sunday British Wellingtons followed up the marauder attacks on Salerno again Sunday night For the first time A36 invader fighters accompanied the marau der squadrons as escort The Italian com m unique broadcast From Rome and record ed by the Associated Press said lhat great damage was caused in Salerno Home asserted 13 allied planes were shot down at Salerno by German fighters and 5 more at Crotone near Cape Colonna and at the Port of Prevesa Salerno is one of the railroad gateways to the toe and instep of the Italian boot An electric rail line passes through the port Cutting this line would force axis army commanders to route troops and supplies far inland more than doubling the distance required to establish and feed the axis army in south Italy The marauder bombers caught a long string of freight cars in an auxiliary railway yards at Salerno blasled rmmy lo kindling wood threw others oft the sidings and set fire to others Industrial build ings and towering mounds of coal also were reported hit The bombers escorts the pow erful A36 invaders engaged more than 40 German and Italian inter ceptors who were trying to break through and reach the main raid ing force The invaders first were official ly announced in use after the in vasion of Sicily They have been used mainly as fighterbombers and have hung up a successful record while hunting in packs against ground objectives They were credited officially with destroying Z of the 28 en emy planes shot from the sky A running battle between the axis planes and the marauders and invaders lasted 35 minutes af Bftsttsjawa a live Japan 1 samnle ol the de jt CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTER ARRIVEST V Jett Chinese foreign minister is greeted by Canadian Pnme Minister Mackenzie King as he arrived in Quebec for the allied waxconferences Massed Bomber Strength on Bulge of Qhina Indicated Secretary Knox Arrives in Quebec Australian Official to Attend SEIZE HEIGHTS NEAR AIRDROME OF SALAMAUA Yanks Aussies Pound Defenses Preliminary to Final Assault By BRYDON TAVES Allied Headquarters Southwest Pacific Allied troops held heights overlooking the Salamau airdrome on the new Guinea coast Monday after a 2rnie advance American artillery pounded the main defenses of the enemy coastal base with increasing fury as the Yank and Australia Jungle troops tightened lines hemming the Salamaua pen insula preliminary to the final assault A communique announced that the Aussies seized the ridge com manding the airdrome from the south Sunday It brought them to within a little more than a mile ot Salnmuuu town which lips been destroyed by allied bombing and practically against the main defense works behind which the enemy had taken hasty refuge Gen Douglas MacArthurs spokesman said American troops across the Francisco river from By DOUGLAS B CORNELL Quebec The arrival ot Secretary of the Navy Knox and an announcement that Sir William Glasgow Australian high commis sioner in Canada would follow indicated Monday that the Que bec war conference was aiming hefty new blows at Japan There was good reason to be lieve that the allied high com mand might have decided to mass sufficient bomber strength in the eastern bulge of China to play havoc with enemy life lines in the China sea and blast the Japanese mainland itself structioh already heaped on ports and industrial cities of Germany 1 President Roosevelt has pro claimed publicly the determina tion of the allies to send up aerial armadas from China to the Japanese 2 China is known lo have asked that the bomber force now oper ating in her eastern zone be in perhaps 10 times for creased exaclly that purpose survey of air transport facilities operating out of India is said to have shown that it would be possible to supply and service 3 to 4 times the riumber ot bombers presently in eastern China Moreover the end of the Sicilian campaign may release additional transport planes for the IndiaChina ferry route 4 If the war is to be brought t t if i T ls ne brought Knox came infrom Washington lo bear on Japan itself which niiim iif must be done eventually in any event she is most vulnerable to attacks from the west where u the by plane late Monday morning and was to dine with President Roosevelt and Prime Minister F R to Broadcast Talk Wednesday Washington white house announced Mondaythat President Roosevelts address in Ottawa on Wednesday will be delivered at 11 a m and will be broadcast Churchill of Britain Monday night The Australian high com missioner was on the way by rain from Ottawa T V Soong Chinese foreign ninister who flew up from Vashington Sunday went to Quebecs massive old citadel in the forenoon for conferences with the president lasting throueh lunch While Churchill and Prime Minister W L MacKenzie King of Canada arranged a midday drive through the streets of Que bec with a stop at city hall so the people could sec them Mr Roosevelt was hoping o find time to get in more licks on the ad dress he will make in Ottawa Wednesday heavy bombers can make round trip from China 5 The blasting of Japanese shipping out of the China sea would soften the enemys resis tance all around her defense per imeter and help cripple war in dustries at home The China route is used not only to supply Burma the Netherlands East In dies and even more advanced Japanese army outposts but also to bring back to Japan the raw materials of warfare acquired in these conquered regions 6 Secretary of he Navy Knox whose main interest is in the Pacific war theaters where navy men for the most part are in command arrived Monday on the scene of the Quebec conference Soon was brought to Que bec for 1 purpose and obviously he would not have been invited to participate in discussions with Mr Roosevelt and Churchill on the next to the last day of the conference if they merely had bad news for him or if any far reaching decisions on the conduct of the war mained on the agenda in the Pacific re His speech is expected to stress friendly CanadianAmerican re lations and touch on the confer ence here only in the most gen Soone Hew in from IVashine ton late Sunday at the request of President Roosevelt Presi dential Secretary Stephen Early emphasized that his discussions with the chief executive and Prime Minister Churchill of Britain will have to do with the plans for the war on Japan That fact gave support to the oea that allied strategy perfected icre calls for powerful aerial hrusts at the Japanese from bases n eastern China Pure logic nnd these additional acts also weighed in favor of an a 24 hour boat trip on the St the enormous supply of munitions Vi IIMl4JLilJJdr I from planes to bullets streaming broen from allied war plants at a con stantly accelerating rate fclj in Iliij allied war capital were in a posi tion virtually to forget about vol assaults on centers of enemy re sistance i uuuie1 m oermany were or lo Norway wherc 1 u Servicemen to buy pack for nan in service overseas beirh of Alt LANDINGSCanadian and American troops crowd the beach of an Aleutian island as they are loaded on shallowdraft landing craft for the trm to Kialca whch the Japs had evacuated Large supply of fuel at left is for mo ovL units Salamaua skirmishes but were airdrome had new with Japanese units pouring in an ever stronger rain of artillery shells on the enemy positions A 20 plane attack paved the way for a bridgehead across the Francisco by bombing and strafing Kenne dys crossing near the field Fri day The faltering Japanese resist ance followed a neiv assault on the Wewak airdromes to crush again the reinforcements being speeded in by the enemy trying to recoup from last weeks dis aster A Sunday communique said the day before Mitchells escorted by lightnings made a raid at Wewak that cost the enemy 78 more planes Thirtyfour were left burning on the ground while 39 and prob ably 5 others were shot down The cost was 3 allied fighters missing and a few damaged It brought the weeks total of en emy planes definitely at Ucwak to 279 plus 39 damaged or prob ably ruined While the current fighting in the southern Pacific centered in the New Guinea area American troops cleanedout a pocket of enemy resistance on Baanga is land just off Munda on New Georgia in the central Solomons capturing several Japanese field pieces that have been shell in Yank positions on New Georgia For the 2nd time since the fall of the Philippines allied planes on reconnaissance ranged north of the equator Liberators flew to Hie Greenwich island area 850 miles above Buna New Guinea check ing on enemy shipping and at tacking 2 freightertransports DANISH PLANTS Sabotage Continues Despite Kings Plea Stockholm newspaper Svenska Dagblatict said Monday 2 RENEW NIGHT RAIDS ON NAZIS Chemical Works North of Cologne Lashed London Pj British bombers returned to their crushing attacks on Germany Sunday night after ati interval of 2 nights and the air ministry announced that the chemical works at Leverkusen fi miles north ot Cologne were the special target The said that Dusseldorf in tlie Rhineland also was attacked and that 11 British fighters and a number of bomb ers were shot down in random attacks on other objectives in the western rcich The ministry described these as intruder patrols over railway targets and airfields The air ministry said 5 bomb ers were lost in the nights ac tivities Heavy clouds mnde it difficult to see results the communique said Lcvevkusen was bombed twice in 1940 but has not been a spe cific target since Hardly had the night raiders re turned than light bombers and fighters sped out by daylight to day to resume the assaults The night attack ended n lull that had lasted since Thursday night when mosquitoes struck at Berlin Enemy raiders scattered bombs in East Anglia and also rumbled over southeast England Sunday night At least 2 were shot down An alarm sounded in London soon after midnight hut no incidents were reported Late Sunday marauder medium bombers of Ihe U S Sth air force attacked an enemy airfield at Beaumont Le Roger in occupied France Escorting spitfires and tlie bombers knocked down 9 enemy fighters One bomber and 8 allied fighters were listed as missing Stockholm dispatches to Lon don morning newspapers said the Germnns were looking for the in Cuts Off Own Arm Caught in Hay Baler Waterloo Olson 32 working alone on his farm near here look out his pocket knife and cut his right arm off at the elbow when it was shredded and locked in the machinery of a hav baler Then lie shut off the baler and tractor and walked half a mile to the home of a neighbor Hos pital attendants said his condition was good Doctors later amputated the arm again at the shoulder It didnt hurt because it hap pened so suddenly Olson related All I thought of was the quickest way to get out of there Im go ing to keep right on farming This can t slop me Olsons wife is in the same hos pital where she gave birth lo a boy last Tuesday They have an other boy Gerry Dean 3 My wife took if like a troop er the farmer declared y oivnsKit uagoianct said Mi Conference business had been factories had been blown un in cleared away lo the point where Denmark over the weekend dc aO of lie participants incuding spite a joint appeal from Kins at least some chiefs of staff took Christian X and the a 24 hnur honi 111111111 n for a cessation of attacks on Ger It ul ilt ol 1LM a Lussauon OL alt Lawrence and Saguenay rivers man war activities returning here Sunday night The newspaper said an alumi 1 some authorities close num factory at Frcderiksbure had suggested been wrecked and a Copenhaen probably have been mapped out camouflage factory blasted for putting to tasks of destruction German patrol boat wa reported tuG GnOrrnnilR cnnnltr nf nitMfnn i i J e split by an explosion at Knittels near Copenhagen Sabotage also continued against aniiy accelerating rate railways transport ng troop and said the supplies to Danish ports for move supplies were so extensive that ment to Norway the Stockholm mirtaiy experts assembled in this Tidningen reponed Stockholm Despite a new Quisling decree making death the penalty for Nor vay cars rontaimng food were wrecked at Bergen the Tidningen said A report from Norway said being the nazis were taking over hotels and centers RAF to begin attacking Berlin earnest on Aug 25 the darkest night m August The moon will be hardly visible during he follow iiiR 5 or G nights It was felt that when and if a big air offensive begins it may again be a roundtheclock affair with the RAF bringing real night mares lo Ihe Germans and U S airmen making daylight attacks LIGHTNING KILLS IOWA FARMER Mason 56 Sought Shelter Under Tree DCS Moincs Ma son 56 farmer near Ottumwa was killed by lightning Monday while taking cattle lo a field He apparently sought shelter under a tree when the storm broke His body was found later between the tree and a wire fence His widow a son and a daughter survive The thunderstorm in which Mason was killed was one of sev eral throughout the state over the weekend Slightly cooler weather was forecast for loiva Monday night and Tuesday morning with scattered thundcrshowers in the northeasl and east central sections Monday afternoon and early Monday night JUDGE SCOTT WILL RETIRE Served Northern Iowa Federal Court District Washington I7P George C Scott United States district judge lor the northern district of Iowa plans to retire in December the office of Senator Gillette D lowa made known Monday Scott 79 lins been on the northern lown district bench since 1922 He is a former member nf congress having been elected lo the house in 1912 to succeed the late E H Hubbnrd and rceiccted in 1913 He also served m the house from 19171 A native of Monroe county N Y Scoll moved lo Iowa in i860 He was admitted to the bar in 1887 and practiced Inw at Le Mars Iowa I88B190I He has since been a resident of Sioux City He is a republican When buying a pack of cigarets contribute 5c o Cfearels for Servicemen to buy pack for a man in service overseas END CONTROL OF 53 COMPANIES Mines Are Restored to Operation of Owners Washington UP Interior Sec retary Ickes Monday restored to private control mines of 53 com panies which he had been oper ating as coal administrator for the government since May 1 Some of the mines turned back had suffered an interruption in production by work stoppage indicating that they fckes said might have contracts with John L Lewis united mine workers Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Thundcrshowers nnrl squalls Monday afternoon Monday night and early Tues day continued warm Monday afternoon cooler Tuesday fore noon IOWA Scattered thundershowers northeasl and easl cenlral por tions Monday afternoon and early Monday night not quite so warm Monday night and Tuesday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 85 Minimum Sunday night 63 At 8 a m Monday 70 Rain 53 inch YEAR AGO Maximum 72 Minimum 47 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday go Minimum Saturday night 62 YEAR AGO Maximum RQ Minimum fig Precipitation 01 Department officials however would give no immediate clarifi cation on this point Lewis in ending the frd gen eral strike by the UMW in June said that his miners wove to work until Oct 31 only if tlie govern ment retained control of the mines throughout that period The mines were returner ii ac cordance with Ihe SmithConnally antistrike act requirement lhat properly seized by the government be returned within 60 days after restoration of productive effici eiency Although citiing this provision of Ibe act fckes did not reveal his mlcrprelation of the provision or say whether Attorney General Biddle has given him the ruling he had asked on what Ihe act re quires him to do about restoring the mines Approximately 3700 mines con tinue under government control Ickes has been surveying the productive efficiency of these mines preliminary to clotcrmminp Ihe applicability of the provisions of Ihe SmithConnally act pertain ing to the release of the properly Reds Britain Should Be Invasion Base Moscow the com munist party newspaper said Monday that the British isles should be the main base for in vasion of the continent A crushing blow upon Ger many is almost impossible to con ceive without utilizing the enor mous strategic advantage of the British Isles Pravda asserted Invasion from England the newspaper added could be sup ported by a strong aerial fighter force as well as army and navy bombers It estimated 20 times fewer ships would be required to land nnd supply forces in western Europe than would be needed for an invasion from the Mcdilerrau Thinks War to Require Employment of 3rd df All Women Over 14 Chicago war will re quire by the end of the year em ployment of approximately of all American women over 14 Margaret A Hickcy chairman ot the womens advisory committee of the war manpower commission says She told the National Asso ciation of Women Lawyers Sun day that it is important to keep in mind that at present there are no reserves of unemployed per sons in most of the needed semi skilled skilled and professional classifications NAZIS DECLARE WITHDRAWAL BASE ORDERLY Germans Appear to Be in General Retreat Across Southern Russia By WILLIAM SMITH WHITE London Marshal Stalin announced the capture ot Kharkov Monday and the Germans appeared to be in general retreat across south Russia A Stalin order of the day to field commanders broad cast by Ihe Moscow radio and recorded here by the soviet monitor told of the seizure nf the city by storm Tlie German high com mand communique issued earlier in the day had ad mitted the loss of Kharkov say ing that the nazi garrison with drew without Russian pressure Directed to Lt Gen Ivan Konev Gen Nikolai F Valutin and General Orlovsfcy the order said Today Aug 23 our troops on the steppe front with active col laboration from the flank of troops ot the Voronezh and south western fronts as a result ol fierce engagements broke the re sistance the enemy and took by storm the town oC Kharkov Thus the 2nd na tive liberated from the yoke of the Gorman fascist blackguards Kharkov is a for mer capital of the Ukraine In offensive engagements for the liberation of the town of Kharkov our troops displayed high military skill cornage arid ability to maneuver Tlie fall of the city was pre sented by HNIS German news accticy as an evacuation in which the Russian pressure had no narl In a broadcast an noiincitifr withdrawal from he tasc DNB said Kharkov was no loiiKer a valuable center of traffic and supply and declared all important installations there hart been destroyed by the iiazis before they pulled out Kharkov the great industrial center in the Ukraine was last recaptured by the Russians in February and lost by them again in March and hns changed hands times in less than 2 years It represented the major nazi position east of the Dnieper river and has been the base of a salient from which the Germans could thrust out to menace the Russians anywhere from Moscow to the Caucasus Kussinn broadcasts aiul reports from the Germans themselves iii dicalcii violent fighting west ot the city now rising toward per haps some fiitcful conclusions The mixis were at pains to insist that the withdrawal was orderly The Russians have declared lhat German commanders were SMOLENSK Vyaima Spas Demensk REDS GAIN Germans fled Kharkov after having of fered stiffening resistance details area where the Rus sians say the Germans have lost 1000000 killed and wound ed since nazis began abortive offensive luly a Shaded ra German held   

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