Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, August 18, 1943 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 18, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME or MSTOHY AND AftCHIVCS j A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NflGHIORS VOL XL1X ASSOCIATED KIRS HOME EDITION imrrn E LEASED MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY AUGUST 18 1943 TfflS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE CRUSHING AIR BLOWS FALL ON AXIS tosses In Sicily Total 167000 H County Bond Quota 225 Jap Planes Caught I M 3RD WAR LOAN Quota Nearly Double April Drive Figure Cerro Gordo countys quota in the 3rd war loan drive stalling Sept 9 is 52044000 County Chair man F C Eighmey announced Wednesday The figure is almost double our quota in the 2nd war loan drive he pointed out but suc cess of the Sicilian invasion and imminence of the continental in vasion has boosted the need i vi in ivmu we to shorten the var drive scheduled to start Sept 9 for the boys on the fighting front and continue through the month we at home must dig deeper to will be from non help them now DRIVE TO OPEN SEPT 9 IN U S Plans for North Iowa Campaign Made at Clear Lake Meeting Iowas share of the 000 quota for the third war loan And the deeper dig the better will be the nations finan ial condition when the boys come banking sources V L Clark exe cutive manager oi the Iowa war finance committee announced at UiUiUU1 llre UUys come a Clear Lake meeting with North to see how we have Iowa campaign Jeaders been managing in their absence The money is here he insisted calling attention to the 25 per cent increase in bank deposits since Jan 1 1942 Those de posits increased at the same time we were putting savings also into war and buying land The quota for the state is nearly double that of the 2nd war loan drive in April Mr Clark pointed out to represen tatives from six counties who met with him and his deputy James A Cummins also of DCS Aloines and Fred A Heiieman TMason City regional chairman 11 is not necessary to explain the quota the Iowa chief added but he pointed out that the 000000000 national quota is less than a third of the 50 billion dol lars the war will cost during the last half of 1943 He also pointed out thatdespite bond purchases of 5400000000 in County Quotas 721000 2644000 Butler Gerro Gordo Chicfcasaw Emmet Floyd Franklin Hancock Hardin Howard Humboldt Mitchell Palo Alto Uinnebaso Winncshiek Worth Wright 596000 722900 842000 751000 1057000 564000 670000 1153000 7 07090 684000 600000 8 SB 000 454000 851000 Eighmey Mason City H C Arm strong Britt H L Strong Hum bolt Burt J Thompson Forest City and Russell R Smith Eagle Grove Eugene Murtagh Algona was unable to attend Other workers who sat in on the meeting included V D Koons Carl Frick and F D Reibsmen all of Britt J F Miller R G Nelson and B B Watson all of Humboldt C A Phillips and F L McMahon both of Algona Howard A OLeary Mason City Owen F ConwclC Goodell F A Arnold Ktemme L E Beer and R C Allbaugh both of Eagle Grove Larry Day and Paul R Henry both of Clarion and S R Torgeson Lake Mills Iowa since Jan 1 1942 bank deposits have increased S271 838000 The rural counties have shown the largest proportionate increase in bank deposits Mr Clark de clared and farm communities con sequently will face an intensified bond selling campaign He listed the following increases in bank deposits in the last 19 months lor the G counties in the region Cerro Gordo 248 per cenl Hancock 514 Humboldt 571 Kossiilh 741 IVinnebaeo 353 and Wrichl 547 Plans for the campaign the largest ever launched by the United States treasury call for an actual housetohouse canvass of every home in Iowa both rural and urban Mr Clark said Slogan the 3rd war loan drive will be Back the Attack With Bonds Mr Clark reported and added that the slogan meant extra bonds in September for every family Every American citizen who has any money at all oven barest living expenses will be expected to participate he de clared There arc five good reasoi i buying war bonds he asserted 1 To help your country It takes planes tanks ships equipment and supplies to win a war and they cost money The people must take the necessary money out ot earnings and accumulations and put it into government securities not such a sacrifice when you consider that we get all back with interest 2 To back up our fishtinc men There are tew people in America today who dont have a son hus band father mother sister or friend in the service In the lives of the men st the front lies the very salavation of the country All the people at home are asked to do is to help pay part of the cost Pvt Mike Rampa Jr from his tools they need fSnt wife during their honeymoon Wlth Rampa got a sixhour leave with 3 To help keep prices down all ot us stop spending and UA u omf aHeuuiiig ana mumiujj anen nis wile start investing every cent over year old sister got lost For essential expenses the country hours he helped look for the child will soon be faced with a serious He found her finally at serious inflation 4 To build a nestejtx It is only common sense to think ot the and other investments too he added Out of the quota cor porations are expected to absorb 5850000 Mr Eighmey continued leaving 51794000 as the share of individual purchasers Organization work for the drive in this country already is well under way the chairman revealed and the opening gun will be loaded and ready to fire on Sept 9 period after the war when ac cumulated savings will really count7when the money will be needed for necessities comforts and luxuries 5 To insure the peace When the war is over and the service men and women come back there may be more people than jobs there may be less money and more things to buy During that period readjustment those with money in government securities will have a decided advantage Mr Clark discussed the quotas assigned with the North Iowa men and introduced to them the campaign materials to be used He also discussed organization methods and publicity Those attending included PLAN NEW MEDICINE FOR JAPS moves againstJaps are the subject this discussion between Admiral William FHalsey left commander of the south Pacific forces and Maj Gen John H Hester commanding general of the Russell islands occupation force They are seatedin a jeep on one of the islands of the Russell group in where Americans arc still advancing U S M C photo bombs dropped from tors flying fortresses Mitch ells and Bostons A dispatch from Associated Press War Correspondent Vern Haugland from somewhere in New Guinea said heavyweight bombers ot the U S fifth air foice dropped more than 100 tons if bombs in their predawn strike on the Wewak area and encoun tered heavy antiaircraft fire Seven or eight hours later Mitch ell medium bombers escorted by lightning fighters struck a second hard blow and met feeble anti aircraft fire and scant fighter op position NAZI SUGGESTS JUST PEACE Says Reverses Chastened German Extremists By UNITED PRESS A Berlin radio the openly suggested commentator a negotiated vov luuiuueu ine openly suggested a negotiated following county chairmen F C I peace Monday night and said the Eifjhmev iVfasnn AIY riftrmtin German Air Force Is Staggering Spaatz Tells U S Flyers ALLIED HEADQUAHTERS IN NORTH AFRICA Ger man air force is staggering Lt Gen Carl A Spaatz declared in an ions for addrcss to American flying fort ertnrl ress crews returning from their bombings of French air fields Tuesday north Marseille The commander of the northfest Afri uiej cosi money jne people must 5alValT torces credited American take the necessary money out ot dauSnt precision bombing with mnirnT part of the decline of the German air force This he said has rev olutionized warfare Double Feature Movie Keeps Soldier From Wife on Honeymoon PUEBLO Colo was a double feature movie that kept Tuesday to get married That took 30 minutes Then his wifes He found her finally at the movie But the honeymoon was over I didnt expect Niagara Falls he said But gee whiz German people would gladly1 dispose of some nazi leaders once the war is ended The broadcast directed to North American listeners was recorded by the CBS and NBC short wave listening stations here The commentator who called himself Bill said it is quite possible that the suffering sac rifices and reverses of recent months have chastened German extremists and made the people generally better disposed to accept a practical workable and just peace but this doesnt mean un conditional surrender Signs are increasing that the war may have reached a crucial a most dangerous turning point a point beyond which the hope of checking the conflagration before it menaces western if not world civilization itself will steadily diminish If the statesmen and the peo ples of the world are able to bring a proper end to this war by a rea sonable just and generous peace no great political transforma tion would be called for and in view of technological progress re covery rapid7 would be reasonably The commentator said it was the reaction to defeat and the in justice of the Versailles treaty that gave rise to totalitarianism some of the leaders of which the Ger mans would gladly shake off once they were themselves free of out side menaces Badoglio Says Sicily Will Be Won Back By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Italian Premier Marshal Pietro Badoglio told his people Wednes day night in a radio address that the numerical superiority of lie enemy hns forced us to abandon Sicily but pledged to the Sicilians that they would be returned to Italy The speech lasted less than three minutes While it was addressed to the Italian people as a whole it was directed particularly to the Si cilians and the premier said Sicilians dont despair A peo ple cannot perish if it keeps its faith You will keep your place in the affections of the Italian people salute the heroic Si CARDS PHILLIES SPLIT 6063 SPORTS BULLETINS PHILADELPHIA P T h e Phillies beat the SI Louis Car dinals 6 to 3 in the second game of a swing shift doublehender be fore 18000 in Shibe park Wed nesday after dropping the open er 6 to 0 The Phillies scored five runs in the first inning of the afterpiece INDIANS DEFEAT 9g CLpvp n i lc CLEVELAXp Blasting strip JrifHSh t Jeff Heaths tirstmmng homer Report Mayors of 3 Italian Cities Quit NEW YORK British radio reported Wednesday that the mayors the Italian cities of Milan Como and Verona had re signed in protest against Ger man interference in Italys inter nal affairs The broadcast vas recorded by CBS When buyinr a pack of cicarets contribute 5c to Cfgarets far Servitenienv ta buy pack fer a service aveneas e to defeat the York Yankees 9 to 8 in the I morning game of swing shift doubleheadcr Wednesday Joe Gordon hit his llth homer for the Yanks to start their last inning attack Nazis Execute Serbs in Reprisal Moves LONDON Jugoslav peasants have been executed by the Germans at Kraljevo Croatia m reprisals for the blowing up of a bridge and 12 boys from ihe same town were shot for illegal resistance the Jugoslav govcrn mentincxilc said Wednesday on Ground in Sweeping Victory in New ALLIED By C VAXES McDAMEL HEADQUARTERS IN THE SOUTHWEST ctt and prisoners PACIFIC Japanese aitforce was dealt its most humiliating defeat of the war Tuesday at Wewak New 3 Guinea where 225 of its planes were caught on the ground e by allied bombers 120 destroyed 50 severely damaged and an estimated 1500 air personnel killed Only seven of the enemy plants even got into the air and three were shot down Out of some 200 planes in the raiding party only three were lost This staggering blow virtually stripping Uie enemy of his air strength in central New Guinea was dealt by 10000 Numerically the opposing forces were about equal in strength but one was jn the afr and the other was not Gen Douglas MacArthur commented jubilantly Nothing is so helpless as n plane on the ground It was the opening battle for aiisupremacy over central New Guinea said Maj Gen Ennis C Whiteiicid commander of the ad vance echelon of allied ailforces in the southwest Pacific The surprise was complete and devastating Allied reconnaissance planes had detected the Japanese massing the greatest force of planes they ever had assembled in the Wcwak area Obviously the enemy intend ed to make some surprise move in support of Japanese jungle troops now falling baelc slowly before Americans and Australians near Salamaua Nipponese air base 350 miles down the New Guinea coast from Wcwak The surprise worked the other way The first of more than 10 waves of American and Aus tralianmanned planes appeared over the four airdromes of the Wewak sector during the dark lirst hour of Tuesday Hour after hour until into day light the flyers crisscrossed the spreadingareas of smoke and flame Many of the enemy planes were standing wing lip to wing tip perfect targets Sixty Japanese bombers anci fighters were found warming up on the Borum airfield The crews were inside Ground attendants stood nearby Fragmentation bombs swiftly turned the scene into one of fiery wreckage and the Japanese flyers to get off the death Some ot frantically tried m ground Allied bombs and bullets transformed these planes into burning coffins After the bombers were through attack planes and fight ers roared low to pour out cannon and machinegun fire They scored heavily against enemy personnel sonne Appearance of allied fighters in UVU iijiiiiLis dlccd strongly that a fighter air has been established con by closer to the northeast New Guinea coast than Port unea coas than Port the Cleveland Indians just man Moresby which is across the Owen aged 1 to survive a fiverun rally Stanley mountains and more thaS hC mies southwest of it United States forces have occupied Vclto Lavella island Below across the Kula ffulf oil N e w Georgia Wednesdays communique reported new ground successes within three miles of the trapped Japanese garrison at Bairoko harbor Other planes bombed Japanese installations on Buanga island two miles west of the captured Munda airfield Five hundred miles above Dar vin Australia lludsons and beaufighters manned by Austral ians set an enemy troop transport afire in the Aroc islands and killed at least SO troops An 8000 ton enemy transport and a medium cargo ship were attacked by bombers near Mew Ireland Tuesday Official quarters said no land ing has been or attempted on Bnanga Island and no an nouncement to that effect hud been yivcn Bnanga and Karapalah two islets in Wana Wana lagoon 2 and 5 mites respectively noi ill west of came into he Mew Georgia battle picture for the first lime Wednesday when navy torpedo and dive bombers attacked c n c in y installations there Elaborating on this mention in MacA i1 h u rs communique a spokesman said that formations of avengers and dauntless dive bombers bombed Japanese batter ies on these islands The enemy had been shelling American posi tions around Munda Reports from the south Pacific did not indicate how or when 1he Japanese got to Baanga and Ka rapahtah but observers saw the possibility that they had fled across the lagoon during the as sault which reduced Munda air drome early Wednesday morning 4 Engined Bomber From Kearney Crashes All Aboard Killed KEARNEY four cngincd bomber from he Kear ney army air base crashed and burned in a cornfield near Wood IJiver Tuesday afternoon and all persons aboard the plane which normally carries a crew of 10 were believed killed The base public relations office bcrs parachute rom the bomber The last flyers to leave the lartct areas looked back on fires which still could be seen bla7 ine when the planes were 150 miles on the homeward trip Seven hundred miles to the cast in the Solomons the American airforce struck hard at Japans base at Vila on Kolombangara is land the night of Aug IS Flying fortresses Mitchell me dium bombers dauntless dive about a half mile from the crash scene noted the plane apparent ly was in trouble Thompson said it made a sharp turn and then nosed downward landing out of his sight after which he heard an explosion and saw a puff of fire Flames de stroyed the plane and wreckage scattered over several hundred yards of the cornfield while corn within a radius o 50 to 75 yards was scorched by the flames related he U Eisenhower HIT ALL SIDES OF NAZI TORT ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA Gen Dwight D Eisenhower announced Wednesday that axis losses in the Sicilian campaign up to AUJJ 10 totaled 1G7000 killed wouncl The commander in chief said losses while crossing the He estimated that the Nazi commanders had between 70 000 and 75000 troops 011 the island of which at least 110000 were lost not counting the number drowned in the evacu ation The enemys losses in tanks de stroyed or captured up to Aug 10 was given as 2I0 Allied casualties for the entire Sicilian campaign were estimated at 25000 men Gen Eisenhower said The generals report said at least 502 enemy guns were de stroyed or captured up to Au ust 10 Axis plane losses were more than six times the allied losses being 1431 for the axis to 2IT for the allies from July 1 to Au usl 17 The general said in a prepared statement marking the end of the battle ot Sicily The enemys proud boast he would drive the allied forces into the sea wherever he met them in Europe seems to be as empty as the promise to the German peo ple that not one bomb would fall on their cities The allied armies have twice uithin the last few monthsIH flicled severe defeats on the socalled invincible German army in each case at very small cost tn themselves h e Sicilian campaign is standing testimony to the suprem acy of the allied navies in this area of the mediterranean to al lied air supremacy and to the de termination of allied land forces to engage and defeat the enemy wherever they may encounter him Our troops have done every thing the best troops in the world could have done he sairi As an American 1 take Hist as much pride in the British eighth army as any Briton Now weve brought up nn American army that is a worthy partner of the eighth army Gen Sir Harold Alexander he pointed out now has a powerful onetwo ability to swing two real armies as he sees fit Both armies are ready to go at any minute he added We can count on them with complete confidence Surgeon Plumber and Mechanic Join Efforts in Performing Operation LEON UR A s u is e o n a plumber and a mechanic got to gether in performing an opera tion on the arm of Jake Oxford 65 Oninsvillc Mo Jake was fishing in the Grand said announcement of casualties river when he fell off a log and would be made after next of kin An eyewitness Walter E left arm from wrist to elbow Thompson Wood River farme caught his arm on a 12 inch fisli spear The spear penetrated his 2ft arm from wrist to elbow A neighbor took Jake to a hos said he had seen no crew mem pital where a mechanic sawed off the eye of the spear with tools vr h tlJU Wllll IO Thompson his wife standing obtained by calling a plumber Then the doctor operated re moving the spear bombers bombers and avenger escorted by torpedo fighters vj llgjllltls pounded the airdrome installa tions and gun positions Vila now is threatened with from above and below Above Claims Wife Let Air Out of Tires on Car DALLAS husband ask ing a divorce told the judge his wife wouldnt cooperate in mak ing a living In the morning the plaintiff said she lets air out of my tires and I have to push the car a block to the filling station Its awful aggravating when the weather is hot The divorce was granted Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Warmer Wednes day afternoon Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon IOWA Warmer Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon MINNESOTA Warmer Wednes day night and Thursday fore noon Widely scattered light showers extreme northwest portion Wednesday night and west and north central portions Thursday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 72 Minimum Tuesday night At 8 a m Wednesday 63 YEAR AGO Maximum 03 Minimum Precipitation 223 41 Bombers Lost in Concentrated Assault on Nazi Research Center Ky ItOGEIl GREENE Associated Ircss War Editor A thunderous air offensive that hit every flank of Adolf Hitlers European ranging from the eastern Mediterranean through south ern France and Germany to tlie English channel invasion the Ger man high commands frantic hunt Wednesday on the tion Where will the allies strike next With the iS day con quest of Sieily written into thepuges f history many hundreds of allied bombers turned their fury on ouuupied Greece Italy 1Vance the rcich Belgium and Holland in probably the greatest overall offensive of the war The British aitministry said RAF mosquito bombers attacked Berlin duringthe night while the RAKs giant blockbuster raiders struck the Gorman research center at Poenemuende GO miles northwest of Stettin fortyone bombers and 1 fighter were lost in the nights operations A German broadcast said iso lated nuisance raiders attacked Berlin and listed more than 30 planes shot down In daylight Tuesday American flying fortresses making their first shuttle raid from Britain to North Africa thrust deep into the southeast corner of Germany near Munich and dropped their bombs on the nazis second larg est Messerschmitt factory at Re gensburs The planes flew on to North African bases to com plete a mile journey Other flyiiifc fortresses foucht through the stillest fighter op insilion in weeks to blast at the 2icrc ball bearing plant at Schwcinfurt near Frankfurt ItcturniilK flyers said that smoke from the plant billowed 20000 feet in the air Simultaneously U S medium bombers and RAF liahtcrboinbors attacked German iir bises in northern France Belgium and Holland Squadrons if thunderbolts and spitfires which supported the day light operations were credited with shooting down enemy Jiflhters while SG allied heavy bombers I fighterbomber and 5 fighters were reported missing V At dm same lime flyjnjf fortresses from north Africa made their first raid on south ern France bombing German airfields at Istrcs Ic Tube and Salon 25 miles northwest of Marseille Other allied targets in i 24 hour period included Lc Bomget airdrome in Piris the 72acrc ballbearing plant at Schwcinfurt near Frankfurt nazi airdromes at UlleVcndoville Bryas Sud and Poix France the rail terminal at Calais airfields in Holland and Belgium Cape Bonifati and Port Scalca on the Italian mainland the harbor of Greece and shipping in the Aegean sea U S fortresses strung bombs across a park or 150 Ger man planes ncur Marseille it was announced An Italian communitiue siirt allied raiders also pounded the region of Naples Italys biggest port inflicting damage of some importance The communique said 193 persons had been killed and 109G injured in three recent raids on Milan Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers headquarters said allied war planes kept up their heavy at tacks on the heatcn German and Italian armies Tuesday   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication