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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 16, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - August 16, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             OF CvJHK NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME H I T 0 ri Y A N 0 ARCHIVES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHIOKS VOL XL1X ASSOCIATED pttrSS UNITED fgW IJ5ASED WIRES HOME EDITION iTTTTTri MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY AUGUST 16 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 266 SICILIAN CAMPAIGN NEAR END Duffield 60 Manager of Decker Plant Dies j y ILLNESSAFTER HEART ATTACK PROVESFATAL Began Work in 1907 at Deckers Saw Great Expansion in Output Fred G Duffield 60 general manager of Jacob E Decker and Sons died Monday morning at 8 oclock at a Mason City hospital where he had been the past two weeks following a heart attack Mr Duffield suffered a simi lar attack last year spending several weeks in the hospital and recovering sufficiently to return to his desk at the pack ing plant Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon a t oclock at the St Johns Episcopal church of which Mr Duffield was a member In charge of the ser vice will be Father C Burnett Whitehead rector of St Johns Burial will be in Elmwood ceme tery The body was taken to the Patterson funeral home Born in Shenandoah May 28 1383 Mr Duffield came to Mason City with his parents Mr and Mrs S B Duffield three years later and had made his home here since One his first jobs was that of a carrier boy for the GlobeGazette Alter beingrgraduated from the Mason City high school in 1900 Mr Duflield was appointed dep uty for his father then county au ditor This was in the final days of Ihe old courthouse which stood on the present site of the Cecil theater It was while he held this office that the courthouse personnel moved to the present building Mr Duffields next job was that of bookkeeper in the City Na tional bank operated by H E Merrill and Ab Gale In 1907 Mr Duffield ac cepted n position with Jacob E Decker and Sons as bookkeeper and cashier The plant in that year had a hog kill of 44282 compared with the near million mark it has reached since At the Decker plant Mr Duf field demonstrated a theory which he once expressed thus My theory has always been that young people should get into the type of work they like best and then stick to it Mr Duffield went from the po sition of bookkeeper to the sales department of which he was in charge five years He was then made assistant superintendent to Jay Decker a son of the founder of the plrmt Following this experience he returned to the sales department and was placed in charge of the provisions department After the death of Ralph Deck er brother of Jay Decker in 1919 Mr Duffield was elected vice president of the corporation He had general charge of the provisions department until his appointment as general manager in July 1936 by Armour and company which had purchased the plant shortly before Mr Duffield who lived at 303 Second street southeast is survived by his wife two daughters Mrs Brice Thomas Chicago and Mrs T W Grip pen Jr Mason City and a brother K S Duffield who is in the oil business at Kans Included in the long raiiEe of civic activities of Mr Duffield was the general chairmanship of the highly successful 75th anniversary celebration in Mason City in 1928 He was the immediate past president of the Chamber Com merce and a member of board and executive committee Mr Duffield played a prominent part in the Community Chest set up from year to year He was one of the first presidents of the Lions club Mr Duffield served as chair man of the Greek war relief campaign in Mason City in No vember 1940 He was chairman of the Y at C A endowment fund for many years The packing plant head served as member of the Mason City school board from 924 to 1930 was on the board of the Mu tual Federal Building and Loan association FRED G DUFFIELD Russians Push Forward From Earachev on Road to Bryansk Sever Last Main Line of Escape for Nazis m Orel Salient MOSCOW red army divisions pushed ahead from the captured German bastion of Kara chev on the 2G mile road to Bry ansk Monday after severing the last main line of escape for nazi troops trapped in the Orel salient The communist party newspa per Pravda said that the soviet forces were cutting through dense forests acting to prevent the Ger mans from organizing adequate defense lines on the Desna river Karachev fell Pravda said when four Russian divisions stormed stronjr nazi fortifications on the hills commanding the ap proaches to the city and then pursued the tleeing nazis into the streets of the burning town The occupation of Karachev closed the main line of escape for Germans remaining in the Orel salient following the Russians lightning drive westward The size of the enemy force en circled could not be estimated im mediately but earlier dispatches indicated that the Germans failed to retire a large number of men and war machines from the Orel front before the base at Karachev was cut off Tass reported the battle for Kharkov had reached a climax The Germans were said to be throwing troops into the bniile as soon as they could reach the front and resistance was increas ing Karachev lies on the brink oi an immense forest covering Bry ansk from the cast The Oermans had based all their counteroffensives in the Bryansk sector from the vital rail junction of Karachrv and intended o hold off the red army here long enough to erect impregnable fortifications alone the Desna river Soviet troops which were hin dered by bad weather advanced over muddy forest roads often forced to fell trees over swamps m their path Pravda said the out standing feature of the battlca for Karaehcv was the close coopera lion between soviet unit ad vancing along different routes Soviet troops attacking Khar kov from newly captured Chug uev have advanced to within four miles of the great industrial city while other forces on the north were about one mile away from the citys outskirts Tass said the battle was devel oping with great violence and the red airforce was throwing great formations of planes into the fight Other troops cutting ever deep behind Kharkov to the west seek ing to isolate all German forces in the Kharkovarea have reached a point 28 miles northwest of the city RECOVER BODY OF RIVER VICTIM Leland Aberg Located Mile Below River Dam The body of Leland Aberg 21 who was drowned in the Turkey river south of Cresco Friday at 8 p in was found about p m Satinday after being in the water more than 20 hours The body was found bja grou of men who had searched th rivcr from bank to bank about a mile below the point where it disappeared in a whirlpool near the mill dam The men wading in the deep water found the body lodged against a tree which had fallen into the water near the shore of the river The river water had been drained by opening the floodgates of the dam assisting the search ers in recovering the body Funeral services were io be held at the Evangelical church at Cresco Monday afternoon with the flev A L Walker pastor ol ficiating Burial was lo be in the Vcw Oregon cemetery The yoimgmLtn is survived by his parents Mr and Mrs Theo dore Aberg and three sisters Report Milan Swept by Panic and Huge Fires After RAF Attacks With Blockbusters Thousands Parade Through Streets in Peace Demonstration BULLETIN1 LONDON IIP The Vichy radio announced that allied planes had attacked Paris Mon day morning lor half an hour The broadcast said two sections in the Paris area had suffered heavy damage with numerous casualties The Paris radio said that AngloAmerican planes attacked the Paris area and that 48 persons had been killed in Seine Province LONDON fhan 100 twoton bcjmbs were dropped on Milan Sunday night the air min istry announced Monday as neu tral sources reported the city swept by panic and huge fires Fires started 24 hours earlier were still burning when our bombers arrived the air ministry reported Reconnaissance photo graphs showed three oil fires burning in one factory Milan defenses were reiiurted stronger Sunday nieht than ever before but the flak was not severe The Germans put up nieht fiehlers over France to in tercept the bombers but at least two were shot down bombers raided Berlin reported intense antiaircraft and great con centrations of searchlights Dispatches from Switzerland said thousands of Milans inhabit ants paraded through the rubble littered streets of the ruined city Monday morning five hours after the RAF bombers Jett in a dem onstration fov peace With debris 15 to 30 feet high in the streets Milan has virtually ceased to ex thesc dispatches BODY IS rECOVKHED DYEKSVILLE body of Lloyd Digmm 18 who drowned in the Mississippi river Thursday was found at the en trance to Frcnlrcss lake Sunday morning Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Cooler Monday afternoon Monday night and Tuesday forenoon IOWA Cooler Monday night Continued cool Tuesday fore noon M f N N E S O T A Continued coo norlhivcst Cooler south and cast portions Monday night Rising temperature Tuesday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 7 Minimum Sunday night 52 At 8 a m Monday 55 YEAR AGO Maximum 77 Minimum 43 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 85 Minimum Saturday night 60 At 3 a m Sunday 61 Precipitation 137 inches YEAR AGO MaNimum 78 Minimum 57 ist as said Carrying forward the attack a strong force of heavy bombers Monday fleiv over the coast of Britain in a twohour long for mation accompanied by a proces sion of fighters They returned shortly before noon and1 smaller bombers took up the attack Sunday iiijthts attack on Mi lan was made in the bright liffhl of a full moon Targets in the city and the suburbs were Plastered with bombs which set fires visible at the Swiss fron tier hours after the attack was ended Tile first wave of heavy HAF bombers roared in over Milan just leu minutes before midnight The entire action lasted an hour Swiss dispatches said thousands of refugeeswere fleeing the stricken city in confusion while armed guards futilely attempted lo contain them The mosquito attack on Hie German capital details of which were not immediately announced gave Bcrlincrs a taste of things lo come Travelers reaching tlic Suiss fronticr from Milan asserted hat two towers of the cathe dral had collapsed IheSorrcs co palace was destroyed and the royal palace damaged In the battered Seala Farina freight yards they added rails stuck up like uprooted trees The attacking planes drove through heavy antiaircraft fire to reach their targets I Reporting on other operations the air ministry said Aircraft of the fighter com mand on intruder patrol attacked enemy air fields and railwav tar pets in France and the low coun tries One enemy aircraft was de stroyed The air ministry without sav in whether heavy craft or mos quitos or both were meant said 10 bombers failed o return anci two fighters were missing The German air force mean while lashed a south coast town which was later identi fied by a Berlin broadcast as Portsmouth wilh the heaviest assault in two years Sunday night and lost five of some 25 raiders sent over in this anil other scattered raids on coastal towns The raiders came in singlv scattering their bombs over wide lyseparated parts of the city and causing fairly heavy casualties in luding a number killed The heaviest damage wns in dicted in the working class sec tion of the port which was hard hit in previous raids There was no letup in the air assault Monday morning as great formations of heavy allied clay light bombers roared across the channel for two hours under strong fighter escort Later in the day medium bombers and fighters Uiuk up the attack At one lime for mations of bombers swept out at rooftoy level with squad rons of fiffhlers at greater height This attack seemed di rected at two targets as one force went south and some southeast The new HAF blow sustained a steady BritishAmerican air offensive that included raids Sat urday night on Milan and Berlin on the axis airfield at St Qmer France in daylight Sunday and on six enemy airdromes in France and Holland at dusk Strong forces of flying for tresses roaring across the chan nel at the latest hour they ever have raided Europe blasted the six airfields officially described by the u S eighth air force as Germanys most important op erational fighter airdromes in western Europe American ma rauders hit StOmer Fires again were visible in Mi Jan early Monday and bomb blasts were audible in the Swiss frontier city oC Lugano 35 miles away The airfields bombed at dusk Sunday night by the flying for tresses escorted by U S thun derbolts were located at Poix Amiens Lille VltryEnArlois and Mervillc in Fiance and Vlis singen in Holland Searchers Fail to Find 2 Colfax Boys COLFAX workI Anthony ing all night with boats and rakes i whicli ca did not find John Dolinsek 15 and Bill Talsma 13 farm boys feared to have been drowned in South Skunk river near here Sun day afternoon The Dolinsek and Talsma youths went wucling while four younger boys who accompanied them to the river hunting bank went watermelon NEW PLANS FOR WAR STRATEGY ARE DRAWN UP Will Be Submitted to Churchill Roosevelt at Quebec This Week QUEBEC Que Roosevelt will come here sometime this week to begin his sixth formal war lime conference with Prime Minister Winston Churchill which it was indicated Monday will cover far wider fields than previ ously believed 11 was learned on competent authority in Washington that the American and British military staffs at work in Quebec were drawing up an entirely new set of war plans lo submit lo Mr Roosevelt and the prime minister This did not mean it was said that there had been any change in the basic strategy of the many first then Japan Churchill returned here Sun day and it was revealed by the white house in Washington he and Sir Roosevelt had been together for three days at the Roosevelt estate at Hyde Park Mr Roosevelt was back in Washington It was presumed that the two leaders had had preliminary talks presence o Mrs nobseVell and Churchills daughter Mary suggested that the social had been at least one reason for their meeting there Within three minutes after re turning to the historic citadel a British spokesman said Churchill was in the map room busily at work He later saw Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King and the British chiefs of staff Sir John Dill head of the joint state mission in Washington also ar rived Weekend developments made clear the wide field to be cov ered by the conference Among them was the definite disclosure that British Foreign Secretary Eden would be here used many to feel that United States Secretaryof State Cordell Hull or UndcrSccrelary Svimner Welles would come too From this it was concluded that the agenda roughly will be divided into three Paris Military considerations which Many Bought Gas Before Coupon Cut DES MO INKS lions with other mid western mo orists were on the threugal on standard Monday but many of them bad a weekend gasbuy ing fling to inaugurate it Announcement by the OPA of a reduction in the value of A B C gasoline ration coupons from four to three gallons at i m Monday led to the biggest Sunday gasoline business in many months In Des Monies one tilling sta tion operator said the rush even exceeded that on the eve of gas rationing last Dec 1 Several said their SatmdaySuiulay vol ume was four times that of a week igo Filling stations in the Daven portRock IslamlMoline urea re lorled their Saturday and Sunday Business was the largest since ra tioning became At Waterloo Saturdays busi ness was treble the normal for re cent months and Sundays was almost as heavy A Cedar Rapids station ran out of gasoline Sunday and all sta tions reported business dead Monday Im going fishing one opera tor said When the younger boys returned in half an hour they found clothing of the older boys KIIlKD IN CRASH SAN ANTONIO Tex Harold E Deacon 17 will come first and will be secret until they are transmitted into concrete action the Immediate political problems which will be encountered as the armies move into new cnemv ter ritory Long range political problems p j Vikoly to be encountered as the al oe convm illtr action he wu Accidentally Knocked Unconscious Wealthy Woman Dies in Pool PHOENIX Ariz tally knocked unconscious Mrs Gloria Gould Barker member of the prominent Gould family tum bled inio the swimming pool of her palatial desert home Sunday and drowned Efforts of doctors failed to revive her Paul V McCaw justice of the peace and exofficio coroner said death was due to drowning and evidence indicated she had slipped and struck her head on the edge of the pool Wallace MacFarlane Barker her husband and their butler found the body nfter she had been missing only 15 minutes the sher iffs office said MacFarlane is head of the Phoenix war price and rationing board and has lived here about 10 years They moved to their desert home 10 miles cas of here four years ago Mrs Barker was the vmmnesi daughter of George and Edith Kingdon Gould of New York ami granddaughter of the late Jay Gould famous financier of the last century IVhen bujinff a pack of cigarcts contribute Sc to Cigarcts for Servicemen to buy pack lor a man in service overseas ceed to Moscow to discuss what has been done with Soviet Pre mier Josef Stalin Some significance was attached to the arrival here of Lewis W Douglas shipping administrator in the United States who is pre sumed to be confcrrine with Lord Leathers British war transport minister and Canadian shipping men NAZIS FLEE TO LEAVE ITALIANS TO FACE ALLIES Yankees Overrun Axis Rear Guard Only 14 Miles From Messina ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA Allied vanguards closed io within ar tillery range of Messina Monday and although Gcrniiiu shore bat teries opened up against the Brit ish eighth army from the Italian mainland it was officially stated Unit the out of the campaign is at hand Tin U S seven Hi army swiftly overran axis rear guards In the vicinity of Mi lazro M miles west of Messina y y The British sinici northward through Taqrmiiiii to a point 15 miles south uf Mussina There a field dispatch said the forward elements were shelled by the longrange nazi rifles emplaccd along the toe of Italy ID guard Messina Strait The 15inch batteries have a range of 20 miles V The Americans pushing up between 12 and J5 miles ad vanccil well beyond ISarccI lona lit within heavy artillery range it Messina and it was assumed ttiit this main escape hatch was already under ground fire as well as aerial bombard ment BarccJIona ties six miles nouUi iouthwest of Milazzo and miles west of Messina The Germans were in flight All indications are that the nazis have pulled out even their delaying parlies and left Italian units to face IIic climactic British aiid American push The U S Seventh army and the British Eighth army raced forward as rapidly as blownup roads and diminishing resistance permitted The campaign stiil was less than six weeks old V Tim British captured Taor iniua strategic harbor and road junction on the east coast 28 miles by road train Messina Casligliime eight miles inland anil the town of Admitting that axis forces are quitting Sicily the Berlin radio declared nevertheless in a broad cast recorded by NBC that the Messina Strait was heavily auard cd and firmly in German hands AngloAmerican attempts to stop the ferrying service to the Italian mainland will be futile it said American seventh army units pressed forward in the central sector cast of the com munique said A rapid American thrust to the neighborhood of on a promontory about H miles west of Messina has denied the my ttiu use of this important MESSINA BECOMES A of the most gripping dramas of the war is unfolding in the Sicilian town of Messina where two miles across the strait lies the mainland toe of the Italian boot As many as 80 ships now are ferrying German troops across this water in a desperate try at evacuation from the island A concentra tion of oOO antiaircraft guns throws up a ceiling steel here equal to any defenses of the Ruhr but American planes daft in daily to blast the escape ships Shore guns duel with allied vessels raiding strait map inset arrow   

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