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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, July 28, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 28, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION ITITTTTI VOL XL1X AND UNITED PBESS FUU FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 28 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS NO 250 INSURRECTION REPORTED IN MILAN New Record RAF Raid Rocks Ham burg TOPS PREVIOUS MARK OF 2300 TONS ON PORT 6th Raid in 72 Hours Indicates Determined Move to Destroy City LONDON royal air force dropped more than 2300 tons of bombs on Hamburg Tues day night in the biggest raid of the wav and the sixth in 72 hours on Germanys first port and sec ond city the air ministry an nounced Wednesday night For the second time in four nights the battered and blaz ing Hamburg rocked under the greatest weight of bombs ever loosed against a single target the air ministry revealed an nouncing that Tuesday nights tonnage exceeded the 2300 tons with which the annihilation as sault on the city was launched The two record onslaughts bracketed four of lesser impact including two flying fortresses constituting what appeared to be a determined effort to destroy the great port city The new alltime high in tonnage dropped by a single raiding fleet was achieved in a thunderbolt assault packed into 45 minutes of furious bombard ment by a massive force of British bombers TneKAF achieved a hew peak of efficiency at a cost of18 bomb ers lost over Hamburg and in sub sidiaryattacks on the Ruhr Air Marshal Sir Arthur T Har ris chief of the RAF bomber com mand in mapping the second rec ord attack on Hamburg planned to shave five minutes from the lime of the 2300 ton raid Satur day night He succeeded and the air ministry explained Every such cut in the bombing period means greater destruclioi and greater safely for the men and aircraft The Germans were reported reinforcing the defenses of Hamburg as fast as possible Tuesday night the airmen ran into more searchlight beams and antiaircraft fire than ever be fore German night fighters at the same time risked being winged by their own ground barrage to engage the bombers over the target As the greatest air offensive o all time went through its fifth day with allied planes swarming ceaselessly against the continen photographs of stricken Hamburg revealed that fires were raging in the dock area at noon Tuesday There was light to guide oui bombers to Hamburg again Tucs day night an official statemen said but the great pall of smoke which had hung over the oily fo days had dispersed New photographs amply con firmed the great extent and im portance of the industrial dam age Visibility was good Tuesdaj night and the British crewmen saw a huge warehouse near thi docks ablaze They were con vinced that the new raid was even more destructive than that o Saturday night SmoVr boiling up from the in V ferno lhat was Hamburg was ense up to 16890 feet One light commander said he saw bout three times the number if fires visible Saturday nijrhl All were well concentrated said Smoke ivas rising up 21 0 feet from the docks There was no letup in the a ed attack as strong formation fighters and fighterbomber intinued the assault in dayligh ednesday shuttling forth an across the sunny channel t low countries The attack past midday The German high command i communique broadcast by th Tlin radio said that strong en iy formations continued thei Tor attacks on Hamburg Tucs night There were furthe iastations and conflagration Used in several parts ot th I y The population again suf ed losses claimed that 47 of the at j1 king bombers were shot down it I Buy Har and Jmps from yonr GInbeGazelte 7 ter boy DOUGHBOYS VIEW OP A PINCERS is the view seen by many American doughboys as the U S soldiers engage in an enveloping move against Caltanissetta in central Sicily The troops aie shown filing down a mountainside Germans Preparing Last Inhabitants to Dig Trenches Near Front MOSCOW Ger mans are burning villages im pressing the inhabitants into labor angs and forcing them to dig trenches and dugouts for the last desperate defense of Orel on the central Russian front red army dispatches declared Wednesday j A Russian communique re ported lhat Field Marshal Guen ther von Klueges army was continuing to fall back as the Soviets pressed in on three sides of the big nazi base Savage battles were b e in g fought or the sector northwest ot Orel where the Russian troops were cutting in toward the Bry ansk railway The exact locality was not identified in the Russian dispatches but it Was believed to be in the vicinity of the Orel Bryansk railway which the Rus sians have had under artillery fire ince the capture of Studenkovo The town is five miles from the railway which is the only avenue of escape for German forces fac ing encirclement in Orel It was believed that the red army artillery barrage has seri ously hampered if not halted traffic on the railway but there is no indication from the Russian reports that the line has yet been cut Resistance was stubborn the Russians said declaring they had switched to flank attacks and encirclement moves when unable to penetrate German de fenses in frontal assault The midnight communique rcr ported the capture of 50 more villages as the soviet line id vanced from two to four miles closer to the encirclement and capture of Orel The red army war machine captured an important hill and several villages on the drive north of the city toward the Bryansk railway the communique said killing about 400 Germans and smashing 14 tanks and four ar mored cars East of Orel the Germans launched several counterattacks which were beaten off the Ger mans leaving 800 dead and 18 tanks and six selfpropelling guns on the field the war bulletin added The nazis were reported striv ing to hold an intermediate line south of Orel to bar the way lo the iight flank of the Russian pincer movement but were giv ing ground under red army pres sure On the Belgorod front at the fool of the Kursk bulge 165 miles from Orel action was limited to what the communique described as active reconnaissance opera tions Sabu Switches From Elephants to Planes SANTA ANA Cal has switched from elephants to airplanes The youth who formerly played elephant boy in the movies is at the army air force west coast training center He will be come a mechanic The name Sabu Dastapir Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Strolls Out of Butcher Shop With Side of Beef Arm YANKSCAPTURE CEFALU DRIVE AHEAD IN SICILY Advance on Strongly Prepared German Line in San Stefano Area By DANIEL 0E LUCE ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA troops of the seventh army sweep ing eastward toward the Up of Sicily have captured Cefalu 90 miles west of Messina Strait and are advancing against strongly prepared German defenses at San Stefano it was announced at al lied headquarters Wednesday V The Americans are stashing forward on a deep front xlorg the north coast and have also captured Alimcua 25 miles southeast of Cefalu and four other towns behind a line from Cefalu to Alimena The other four arc Pctralia nine miles north oC Alimena Collcsano nine miles southwest of Cofalu Calteveturo 17 miles southwest ol Cefalu and Polizzia just forward of Calteveluro The battle ol the bridgehead ha reached the slugging stage as Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers headquarters communique an nounced that Canadian troops in the center of the front also had made progress in hard fightini and against bjtter opposition James H Harding 85 One of Earliest Pioneers Dies OldTime Story Man Had Lived Heve for Period of 83 Years James Hamilton Harding 85 one of Mason Citys oiliest mstor ans died at a local hospital it 45 oclock Tuesday afternoon ollowing a fall in his home Mon ay night He had been a resident f the city for the past 83 years A former railroadman with a ense ol humor and a twinkle in lis eyes who as he said at one ime had watched Mason City outof short pants and learn 0 strut around in long ones had 1 story to tell but it is still out here in his notes and pictures in he quiet little sitting room of his ionic at 935 North Federal avenue for he was oixe of those men who DENVER Henry G Bress said Wednesday he just sat there drinking beer and thinking how awful meat rationing was and how herd like to have a thick juicy steak So the Denver war plant work er strolled to a butcher shop and came back out again with a 78 pound side of beef under his arm worth some 800odd ration points Police found him at his home slicing the meat Judg John fined Bress S2a and ordered the meat returned to the butcher shop F R Will Give War Report at Wednesday Night Half Hour Broadcast Will Be Made Major Importance Indicated WASHINGTON a backdrop of allied might pound int forward on all major fronts and the political demise of Be nito Mussolini President Roose velt drafted Wednesday his first war report to the American people in five and n half months The president will broadcast for half an hour on all networks Wednesday night at oclock central war lime md the white house labeled the address of major importance 3f SJi if Mr Roosevelt told his press radio conference Tuesday he would talk on the war and he made it plain he considered war activities at home and in Ihe actual theaters of combat of parallel importance a hint on the scope of Wednesday nights speech He was in a position to paint a glowing picture ot events in Uic Mediterranean the Pacific Russia and from the skies over Europe But words of caution appealed in order from tlie chief execu tive on what has been happening here to wages prices manpower internal disputes in the govern ment as well as on an admitted possibility that war production goals for 1943 may not be at tained Not since Feb 12 when he spoke at a dinner ot the white house correspondents association has the chief executive presented a comprehensive review of the war to his countrymen Allied armies then still were trying to exterminate enemy resistance in Tunisia and the president prom ised that the consequences of victory here would be actual in vasions ot the continent of Eu rope1 In the ensuing months the victory was won in Tunisia Sicily was farjtely subjugated fell fron power did not days wish for tiie good old prospects appeared that might become the first axis Power to be forced to accept the unconditional surrender the al lies have decreed for their foes Obliquely Mr Roosevelt indi cated Tuesday that there would be no receding from that policy of unconditional surrender de claring that Secretary oC State Hull already had covered the matter in saying he had seen no intimations and expected none from the white house or war de partmcnt that Ihe policy would be altered H Mr Roosevelt had any opinion to express on the down fall of Mussolini lie was saving it for Wednesday nihf He die tell his conference that neither the white house nor the slate dc parfment had authorized a broad cast by Ihe office of war infor mation OWI which referred to Vittorio Emanuele of Italy as the moronic little king and his disapproval was palpable In New York Samuel Graf ton columnist for the New York Posu whom the OWI quoted in its broadcasl issued the follouiiiR statement after hearing of Presi dent Roosevelts disapproval The phrase moronic little kins seems to me a rather tem perate reference to the of state which has declared war on my country but in view of the ominous indications that Enr and America may accept Ihe Badoglio government can only say thai perhaps the mo ronic little is smarter than I thought There was some thought that the chief executive might have been providing a bit of a preview of a section of his address when he stressed to reporters the breadth of the war effort Declaring that too many people went for slogans and tried to simplify things too much he said you could not put the war abroad on one side of a line cJnuvn down the middle of a piece of paper and put the home front on the other because it all ties in together was stapHed before Catania In the eastern sector for the ISth successive than it stopped either at El Ala mein In Egypt when it took up the offensive or at the Marcth line in Tunisia Announcement of the fall o Cefalu came at least 36 hours late and while there were no more of ficial reports on progress it wa plain that the heaviest America forces were being drawn up for ai allout blow along the north cons The Germans still were gettin Jn reinforcements and it was dis closed that the bulk of two Ifal tan field divisions had into the bridgehead from the wes This appeared to trim down prev ious official estimates that 11000 axis soldiers had been trappec since the start ot the campaign Over 70000 was the last officia count of prisoners Front dispatches said the Germans were completely in charge of the strong Etna line running from San Stefano to Nicosia Agira Catenannova to the Dittalno river and had put Italian survivors of two child divisions which escaped the American encirclement of west ern Sicily to diKKiiie trenches and pernarint road blocks The same reporl however said that political developments do not appear yet to have interfered with theGerman habit of sand wiching Italians in at the front line It is believed lhat only a small number of Italians actually con tinued as combat troops The Canadians driving north east Ilirough difficult country were meeting strong opposition and engaged in bitter fighting Wednesdays communique de clared More prisoners have been taken it added without specifying the number Mr Hardingr was born July It 1858 at Gallon Ohio He came to Mason City in 1860 was reared here and spent the re mainder of his life here He re membered iMason Citys history not for its historical importance but for its human of the humorous tragic and com mon place little happenings through the years that groove heir furrow in a mans memory X There was the John Henry raid1 following the Civil war but the thing he recalled most vividly about that was the fact that his father Squire Harding had to tie the barrel of his rifle to the stock with a while rag to hold Hie thins together when the posse went after the hellrnisers Yes Harding knew all of Mason Citys stories Enough for a dozen books The coming of the railroad blizzard of the early 70s when he and his sister were led home from school tied to a rope early day memories of driving a stage for adollars Say ing on a new school building to earn money to buy his folks their first coal stove and four tons of coal V But Harding never allowed his train of thought to switch on to a narrow gauge line He contin ued hihistorical reading to the last remembered the old actors and plays and did a bit of dauh for recreation He was in the retail furniture business for five years here was on the road as a salesman was a sign painter and was employed on the railroad in various capaci ties throughout his life A member of Ihe I O O F lodge and the Railway Carmen or America he liked association his fellowmen Surviving Mr Harding arc his wife Lizzie two sons Wesley J Harding 1302 Pennsylvania ave nue southeast and Brett William hicago a daughter Mrs Richard Felix Fairmont Minn and three grandchildren Madelyn Roberta and Dorothy Chicago One sister Mrs L P Eversz Eagle Grove nac tsvo nieces Mrs Charlotte LookingUmd Clear Uikc and Mrs Ashley Cedar Rapids also survive lie preceded in death by his fivsi wife Ida A Harding in 1912 lie later married Sirs Lizzie Rossum 2S 1917 who survives him JAMES H HARDING one son Stanley L Harding in 192C Funeral services will be held ill the Patterson funeral home at oclock Thursday afternoon with the Rev Almon J Brakke pastoi of Our Saviours Lutheran church officiating Burial will be at Elm wood cemetery 52 From Albert Lea Go to Minneapolis to Give to Blood Center MINNEAPOLIS jnun sponsored by the War Dads grout of Albert Lea brought 52 vesi dents ot the community her Wednesday to donate a pint c blood each at the Red Cross hloo donor center The group mad the trip in 10 automobiles Leac ers said majority of the club members had made several pre vious donations Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Scattered thundcr showers Wednesday afternoon and Wednesday night not much change in temperature Wednes day afternoon Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon IOWA No decided chungc in lem pcratuve Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon c x e e p t slightly wanner in northeast portion Wednesday night Scat tered thundershowcrs in north and east portions Wednesday af ternoon and evening and in northwest portion Wednesday night MINNESOTA Scattered showers and thunderstorms Wednesday night and in eist and extreme south Thursday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 87 Minimum Tuesday night III At R a m Wednesday 63 Rain Wednesday forenoon 120 inches REPORTS VARY ON NAZI TROOP MOVES IN ITALY Rome Radio Announces Dissolution of Fascist Party by New Cabinet BULLETINS LONDON Home said Wednesday night that the new Italian government has only one MADRID UR Travelers Trom Italy said Wednesday that the Germans had established a headquarters at Bolzano near he Brenner pass for defense of northern Italy and were strengthening their army and strategic points By ROGER GREENE Associated Press War Editor Bloody insurrection verging on evolution was reported to have irokcn out at Milan in northern taly Wednesday as the Rome adio announced that complete lissolution of Mussolinis 21 year old national fascist party had been ordered by the new Italian gov ernment f Meeting under the presidency of Premier Marshal Badoglio the cabinet also voted to abro gate the law under which the fascist grand council became an organ of the slate declaring the law was incompatible with the return to constitutional nor mality Simultaneously conflicting re ports from Madrid and Algiers told of German troops on the move in Italy An Algiers broadcast saidnazi forces were heading northward throughItaly while Madrid ceived word from Rome that Ger man troops had been seen moving south through the Italian capital Monday He was also preceded in death bymostly in n half hour period The Wednesday morning rain which measured 120 inches ai the KGLO transmitter and 111 at the Crystal S n g a r company fell Americans Raid Kiska 19 Times in 2 Days Wake Again Attacked BULLETINS I O N D O X V The Swiss radio in a broadcast recorded Wednesday night bv Reuters said the situation in Milan had deteriorated and armed forces have ALGIERS The news paper Dcinieres Ivouvelles re ported Wednesday thai Italian Premier Pietrp B a d o g 1 i o had started armistice discussions with the allies through British and American representatives at Vati can City The report credited to sources in Switzerland lacked any other confirmation if MADRID WPI Esslestiastical circles said Wednesday that it was understood the British and linited States legations at Vati can City asked their xovern menls for instructions regard ing the allied attitude toward immediate peace with Italy WASHfNGTOiV forces of the Pacific commaml ing Japanese defenses with unprecedented fury made 13 on Kiska island in the Pacific Monday mid Tuesday the navy reported Wednesday and again raided Wnke island in the central Pacific The 19 raids in two days an nounced in 3 navy communi que raised to 40 the number of attacks which bombers and fighterbombers have made on embattled Kiska in a fourday Period The island has been raided 60 times this month as airmen blasted the way for expected strik Italian frontier reports pic tured Italy as engulfed in a wild scries of demonstrations and riots marked by cunfire and bloodshed in nearly a dozen cities of both northern and southern Italy It vns too early yet to put a abcl on the upheaval but reporls indicated it was a spontaneous rc olt by warweary Italians by communists long driven under round and by fascists fighting for survival Dispatches said mobs swept Ihe streets of Milan birthplace of fascism shouting Liberty We wanl pence All workers were reported to have left their jobs and the sit uation was described as extreme ly grave The newspaper II Corrierre Delia Sera reported that fas cists in the Alilari suburbs bar ricaded themselves in unil fired on crowds of civilians and soldier conquest of the enemy stronghold by American amphibious forces The raid on Wake Island was intercepted by 25 zero fighters but the army heavy liberator bombers destroyed seven of the Japanese planes probably destroyed live and damaged three others Four clays earlier a liberator flight had destroyed nine zeros probably destroyed four and dam aged five out of 30 which sought lo prevent a raid Never before had American bombs Fallen on Wake island in raids so close together Prior to the attack last Saturday Ameri can bombers had not made the 2400 miles round trip from Midway to Wake since May 15 The navy communique said that despite fighter rcsisfance and anti aircraft fire bombs placed on designated targets without any American planes being lost or cas ualties to personnel in the Tuesday The newspaper said the fight to wipe out ncsts of fascist defiance long difficult and bloody with some ot the followers of ex Prctiiier Mussolinis regime stilt battling authorities Inmates of the great Milan prison of Ccllulare mutinied and burned part of the prison in an attempted break One prisoner was killed and many were wounded Bombtorn Naples was also the scene of fights in which several were killed and wounded as the people celebrated the fall fas cism Other cities in northern and southern Italy witnessed con tinuous demonstrations llalys role in the war took on a deeper tinge of mysVcry Wed nesday amid a new flurry ot peace rumors speculation that attacks Turkey might act as mediator and nn Algiers radio report that German troops were moving northward through Italy possi bly abandoning the Italians to their fate The status oC Holy under Pre mier Marshal Pietro Badoglios new regime was clouded by a host attack The North Pacific actions against Kiska totaled 13 Monday nnd six Tuesday Both days action ap parently were highly successful The navy reported that in the Monday operations numerous fires and explosions were observed One American plane a warhawk fighter was lost But its pilot was icscucd by 1 navy Calalina patrol of conflicting reporls 1 In London Prime Minister Churchill replied with a crisp no sir when asked in the house of commons whether any reply had been received to requests for the unconditional surrender of Italy 2 Dispatches from Istanbul told of a hasty and mysterious conference at sea between the Italian and Turkish foreign min isters suggesting that Turkey might serve as a gobetween in peace or armistice negotiations 3 Madrid heard that Italy would continue the war on the side of the axis only if Germany J bomber Spolty weather prevented gave adcqaute aid for the defense full observance of the attack Tucs of southern Italy against the day but it was officially reported Ihreat of allied invasion lhat hits were made in the Japa Swiss dispatches said the nese bivouac area Germans were preparing a strong   

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