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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 22, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 22, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME T OF HISTC8YANO A C H I v f ES liO I HE 3 I A THE VOL XL1X HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS ASSOCIATE PRESS AITO MTOP MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JLLY 22 194iJ THIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE SECTION ONE NO 245 YANKS ROUT AXIS IN WEST SICILY Start Fires FIERCE GERMAN COUNTER DRIVE SMASHED BACK Reds Gain Despite Hitlers Order for Nazis to Hold Orel MOSCOW rein II fprcements rushed into the Orel I breaches by I o r c e c marches 11 counterattacked viciously in des efforts to halt the Russian i onslaught Wednesday but were smashed back as the soviet often ttisive rolledgon to nine miles I jot the German stronghold the I Russians announced officially Thursday In a battle increasing violence I which raged 260 miles south of Moscow the Russian said they beat through masses of enemy I1 tanks and infantry for gains of four to nine miles and overran The London radio said that Hitler bad ordered Orel hinge of the entire nazi southcentral de fense line held at all threepronged Russian drive which threatened to outflank the of 110000 from the north and south Sand menaced it from the east held these positions Driving from the north the Rus sians had reached Buky about 40 miles west of the city and within fivemiles of the crucial OrelBry aiisk railvvay at a point 35 miles nprtlwastbf Bryansk Another col umafronuthe ijorth had toppled froftifallen Mtsensk Soviet forces smashing frontally from the east had driven into Zolotarevo VI miles The southern advance on the city was meeting the tougrhest German opposition and a soviet communique said only that the Russians continued to forge ahead That column ivas last reported west of Malo at a point about 39 miles south of Orel In Wednesdays severe battles the Russians said they knocked out more than 77 tanks and 131 nazi planes in th Orel sector alone and announced that the davs fighting which raged as far south as the Donets river basin had taken a toll of 5800 Germans Wednesdays nazi losses brought the totals as announced by the Russians since July 5 to 3393 tanks rnd 2342 planes destroyed and more than 75000 Germans slain At Belgorod 165 miles south of Orel where the Germans gained initial advantages in their summer campaign which were checked when the Russians began to coun terattack on July 12 the Russians said their forces had again ad vanced The Berlin radio explaining the nazi retreats as part of the high commands plan to force the enemy lo the greatest use and abuse of his forces in battles of attrition where the goal is not to gain ground said 45172 Russians haa been taken prisonr and 4827 tanks and 2344 planes had been destroyed or captured since July 5 Davis Hints Allied Propaganda Planned for Next Offensive LONDON Davis di rector of the office of war infor mation who arrived Thursday to visit the OWIs branch office here Chimed that the propaganda line for the next stage of the allied of Vmsive already was well in mind jut declined to give details j He mentioned the Roosevelt Lliurchill declaration to the Ital ians to surrender honorably or suffer the consequences as an ex ample of what is being done to ward a joint BritishAmerican propaganda program The OWI director said he in tended to confer with Brendan Bracken British minister of in formation and other British as I well as American officials He said he might go on to Africa before returning to the United States PRISONER TS FATIENT DBS MOINES Italian prisoner of war member of a group doing farm work near West Liberty Iowa is a patient at the acrny hospital at the Camp Dodge induction station and re ception center where he was rc oorted recovering i LICATA IN ALLIED Stars and Stripes and Union Jack fly over the door to the cityhall at Licata bicily on the islands south coast after it was occupied bv the allies Natives in front of the hall inspect American jeep and duck newtype amphibious two and a half ton truck Duce Persisted in Refusing to Remove Military Plants Vftftemn SayMicnr Prisoner Total in Sicily Over 40000 WASHINGTON the bombing of Rome Acting Secretary of War Patterson said Thursday that Premier Mussolini resisted all efforts to persuade him to remove military installa tions from Rome and to preserve its immunity from attack by de claring it an open city Patterson said reconnaissance photographs disclosed that heavy damage had been inflicted on two railway yards and railroad round houses a steel works a chemical plant hangars at air bases and a number of parked airplanes had been or heavily dam aged He also told a press conference Allied air strength in Sicily out numbers the axis as much as 10 to 1 The enemy has not more than two or three airfields left on the island and these are practically useless because of constant bomb ing by allied planes There is no truth in the axis claims of heavy allied naval losses Thus far the allies have taken more than 40009 prisoners in cluding four generals command ing divisions while our own cas ualties continue to be relatively light The successful operations of the 7th army are particularly pleasing to the war department because of the five divisions par ticipating in the landing opera tions only the first infantry iiyi sioh had had extensive combat experience in Tunisia The 45th infantry division and 82nd air borne division in combat for the first time in Sicily fought like veterans Weather Report FORECAST MASONCITY Not much change in temperature Thursday after noon warmer Thursday night and Friday forenoon IOWA Showers west portion Thursday night and noith por tion early Friday warmer west portion little change in tcmper east portion Thursday warmer Friday forenoon MINNESOTA Scattered thunder showers west and central por tions Thursday night and east portion Friday forenoon wann er Thursday night and south and central portions Friday forenoon cooler northwest por tion Friday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 83 Minimum Wednesday night 54 At fl a m Thursday 65 iEAR AGO Maximum 79 Minimum 51 SUNKEN HELENA CREWMEN Sh01 S Cruiser Helena which was sunk in KuIa m the Solomons July 56 fay the Japanese smile as they line the rail of the destroyer which rescued them SURFACE LINES PARALYZED BY STRIKE IN L A Aircraft Plants Take Unusual Steps to Get Workers to Jobs LOS ANGELES of thousands of workers hitchhiked used precious A book gasoline rations and jammed special air plane assembly trucks Thursday lo get to their jobs despite a 24 hour walkout which paralyzed one of metropolitan Los Angeles two main transportation lines and brought a hint of possible martial law from the army After quick surveys Lock heed North American and Aircraft plants in the suburbs reported day shift at tendance practically normal as the result of preparations for use of fleets of taxicabs ex pansion of sbaretheride pro grams and use of trucks and trailers over regular street car and bus routes Nonwar plant employes were less fortunate Hundreds of local government and business house workers reported late for work Thousands crowded street corners with upraised thumbs Police reported a marked in crease in private automobile traf fic indicating workers usually de pendent upon public transporta tion were using their new series ol gas coupons Workers congregated at main transfer points and clambered aboard the trucks and trailers normally used for hauling plane fuselages wings and other equipment Carpenters bad has tily constructed crude plank benches and scats The walkout of Los Angeles Railway and Los Angeles Motor Coach employes scheduled to con tinue for 24 hdurs paralyzed ser vice for nearly 1000000 daily riders and seriously affected trans portation to the big Lockheed North American and Douglas plants in the suburbs Mayor Fletcher Bowron appeal eel to private motorists U assist in getting workers to their jobs by following regular transit routes and giving preference to those wearing war plant identification badges The possibility of martial law loomed in event workers pro longed their oneday strike in protest against war labor board refusal to grant them wage in creases Brij Gen R W McQuillan second in command of the south ern California sector of the west ern defense command said that the army already was work ing on the possibility of martial lav to assure transportation for war workers in this center of ivarplane production I commanded a unit at Faid Pass in North Africa when the Germans ran roughshod over American forces and I can tell you what it means to be short of supplies he said The strike limited lo 24 hours duration by the union began after a lastminute attempt to acrt il had failed Workers attending a mass meeting called at the request of the mayor left when Bowron and highranking army authori ties failed to appear promptly In halting service the workers ignored an appeal from Acting Secretary of War Robert P Pat terson for uninterrupted trans portation The work stoppage was called lo protest the war labor boards refusal to grant wage increases Thc transit companies and a rail way labor panel had approved th workers demands for a 13ccnt hourly raise but the WLB cut the increase down lo three cents an hour The strike was called despite the promise of War Mobilization Director James S Byrnes who said he would seek new hearings on the wage demands It was be lieved the work stoppage would provide the first serious challenge to the SmithConnallv antistrike oilt enacted last month Buy ttar Savings Bonds Stamp from ynr GlobeGazette and Seek Kin of Injured Man at Hampton here were trying to contact relatives of Arlie Lloyd Faust driver of a Stanby food truck who suffered a frac tured skull and brain concussion when his truck left U S highway 65 in Hampton and turned over onto its side at 6 a m Thursday Just how the accident occurred 01where the driver lives had not been determined on early investi gation It is believed however that lie tried to avoid a catthat pulled into the highway ahead of him and he lost control ot the truck The truck was loaded with 35 crates of tomatoesand 175 100 pound sacks of beans destined to the GambleRobinson company at Mason City The front end if the truck was completely smashed and Faust was unconscious when picked up and taken to a hospital A truck driven by Virgil Mur phy of Hampton headed south was struck by the Faust truck just be hind the cab but the driver was not injured and succeeded in keep ing on the highway The accident happened nt the inteisection of flie highway and Third avenue southeast CIOandAFL Demand Price RollrBack fcamzed labor notice Thursday it will demand removal of Price Administrator Prcntiss Brown and scrapping ot the little steel wage formula if prices arc not rolled back to the Sept 15 1942 level as stipulated by congress and the administration William Green president of the American Federation of Labor and Philip Murray head of the Con gress of Industrial Organizations joined in this statement Thursday after a meeting between Presi dent Roosevelt and the combined labor war board Green said the threat to seek Browns removal was not made to Hie president but that the labor leaders did emphasis to the chief executive that unless prices are reduced they will demand that the war laboiboard cast over board the little slecl formula under winch wage increases of 15 ped cent are permitted lo com pensate for rises in the cost of living since JanTl J941 Green said Brown and othev price and wage stabilization agen cies had failed to check rising prices with the result that wages are practically ftorcn and prices are soaring1 Labors acceptance of the stabi lization program Green told re porters was based oi the assump tion that both prices and wages would be stabilized Murray said no deadline had been set in their conference with the president but he hoped some thing satisfactory will be worked out by the time the group sees the president again at an early date 150 PLANES HIT JAPS BAIROKO PORT POSITIONS U S Troops Advance to Within Few Thousand Yards of Munda Field ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC il States bombers shat tered Japanese positions at Bair oka harbor above Munda on the north shore of New Georgia is land Wednesday in the heaviest air attack ever made in the south west Pacific More than 150 avenger torpedo bombers and dauntless divers op erating under a strong fighter cover pounded the area in a day long series ot raids One hundred thirtythree tons of bombs were dropped and the area was extensively strafed Ihe daily reportfrom headquarters said It was the heaviest air attack that has been executed by the allied forces in the southwest Pacific area A spokesman added thit U also surpassed anything tile Japanese ever dad clone The communique said the raid was made in support of our ground forces This might in dicate American troops were ad vancing from Enogai Inlet two miles northeast where last week they entire Japa nese garrison BairokOMs thejupjoly base for Munda key Japanese defense point in the central Solomons but allied forces blocked traffic be tween the two points last week Only one sentence was used in reporting the ground action at Muncla Enemy ground forces launched a strong counterattack and were repulsed with heavy losses From Admiral William F Halseys south Pacific head quarters however came an of ficial statement hat If S troops advanced to within a few thousand yards of the airfield and that its capture now is in reach if if if The Japanese their artillery knocked out and their armed strength reduced to mortars ma chineguns incl small weapons were said to be contained in pill box defenses ringing the field it self Over MatUmg New Guinea twinengined lightnings won a smashing victory against a much greater Japanese force The batlle took place during an intensive lowaltitude attack by our bomb ers Enemy planes in force were engaged by our fighter escort the communique said They were defeated and dispersed 19 being shot down and destroyed and 11 probably were destroyed Two allied plaiies were lost but one pilot is safe Sharp lighting continued among advanced patrols in the Komiauim district seven miles inland from Salamaua Buy War Savings Bonds anil Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Try to Cut Route of Aid for Sicily LONDON ffi Tieuters re ported Thursday from allied headquarters in North Africa that the royal navy has bombarded the Italian mainland at Crotone in the Gulf of Taranlo on the instep of the Italian boot Desmond Tiguhe a Centers correspondent with the royal navy in the Mediterranean reported cruisers hurled shells into the harbor area for five minutes in the early hours of Wednesday causing a number of fires The British warships suffered no damages in the raid he said The object of the shelling which had been foreseen in in formed quarters in London ap parently was to cut one of the routes bi whicli the axis might send reinforcements to the foe of the Italian boot for transship ment to Sicily This shipment involves n cir cuitous ioutc down the eastern coastal railway and may be used move intensively since the bomb ing of Rome Gen Dxvight D Eisenhower in a press conference Wednesday in North Africa said the Germans were still sending reinforcements to Sicily The German radio a d d e d Thursday that n day and night shuttle service ferrying axis troops across Messina straits was using 38 fast motor launches If The bombardment WAS the lint by allied surface craft ol the Italian mainland since tbe invasion of SieUy and theSec ond of the war The first naval bombardment of the mainland was at Genoa on Feb 9 1941 It possible that some of Britains newest and largest battleships participated The axis has reported the Nelson Rodney King George V and Queen Eliza beth in the Mediterranean The King George V is of a type com pleted since the start of the war Crotone is about 95 miles south east of the major nuval bnse of rarnnto British submarines have shelled the mainland a number of times CLAIM AIRDROME IN ROME RAIDED Italy Lists Toll of U S Attack on Capital LONDON Italian com munique recorded by the Associ ated Press reported that British aircraft attempted to machinegun an airdrome in Rome Thursday morning and said casualties from Mondays American raid on the capital were 717 killed and 1 5S9 injured The Rome war bulletin said al lied aircraft raided Naples Grns seto 90 miles north of Rome and Salerno south of Naples In Sicily the announcement said the allied forces are attacking in central and eastern sectors svith infantry and tanks Several allied ships were de clared torpedoed off Syracuse as well as one large na u s COLUMNS DRAWING NEAR PALERMO PORT Take Castelvetrano Sciacca Other Cities With Quick Advance BULLETIN LONDON Algiers radio said Thursday night that American and Canadian troops had occupied heights dominat iaer the northern seacoast of Sicily XIS FORCES RETREAT VESSINA Following the capture of Enna in the west had ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA The Amer ican seventh army has captured Caslelveiiano and Sciacca on Sicilian south coast in a thunder bolt drive which has placed there but a little over 20 miles from tin western tip of Sicily allied head quarters reported Thursday These other places also wen raptured in the American sweep San Stefano Quisquina only Jbout 30 miles south of Palermc on the north coast and 40 miles west of Enna San Caterina seven miles west of Caltanissetts and 28 mile south ot the north coast Mcnfi midway between Castel vetrano and Sciacca CallabclloUa the Sciacca air drome The airdrome at Castelvetrano Ramacca 22 miles southwestol Catania also fell to the British The American columns now were approaching Palermo the capital of Sicily with a last mountain ranee guardingthat vital seaport Ciislelvctrariu is50 miles west of Agrigenlo ami Porto Emped oclc towns on the south coast cap tured by the Americans last Sat urday and Sunday Sciacca is about 30 miles West of these two Places The American steamroller was making swift progress in a drive toward Palermo on the north coast herding panicky Italians ind their German allies into the northeast corner of the island and the 1 Lilian 20th Assicta division was said to be surrendering almost c n m a s s c as axis prisoner mounted to more than 40000 Alone the cast coast how ever fierce fighting continued between the Simeto river and Catania where the German Hermann Goering armored di vision and fresh nazi forces in cluding a parachute infantry battalion were contesting every inch of ground with Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys eighth army The eighth army however was making steady if stow progress The Italian debacle in central and western Sicily appeared lo be oti i scale comparable to Mar shal Itodolfo Grazianis defeat it the hands ot tile British in the Libyan desert in tgl Every spark ot fighting spirit appeared to have been stamped cut in the ranks of an apathetic and disintegrating Italian army New batches of prisoners com plained that their officers were deserting them wearing civilian clothing in nn effort to escape Castelvetrano a city of 25 000 and one of Sicilys three biggest air bases was captured in a prcdawn infantry assault A huffe American armored col umn of medium and lifht tanks and halftracks exploited the Rain said an Associated Press dispatcJi from the newlywon city if if The city fell so speedily that the defenders had lime only to destroy a few of lie military in stallations It was disclosed that the often 1csiiscitalccllOlh Bersaglieri regi ment for the third time had been put out of action H surrendered at Agrigcnto without firing a shot On the cast coast before Ca tania the allied communique said Ihc Germans were resorting to heavy demolitions of roads and bridges and defense minefields to delay the eighth armys advance Fierce fighting was takingplace the communique said and heavy casualties are being inflicted on the enemy Alliedair forces again smashed at Crotonc airlicld and Naples   

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