Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: July 7, 1943 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - July 7, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT AND ARCHIVES OINCS IA THE NEWSfAm THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XL1X ASSOCIATED PBTSS AMB UNTCTO tlABTD HOME EDITION iTTTTTTl MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JULY 7 1943 THIS PAPCB CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 232 BLAST 10 JAP SHIPS IN KULA GULF Nazi Toll Heavy for Insignificant Gain 5 1211 GERMAN Nazis Claim TANKS LOST IN Main Russian 2 DAY BATTLE Hitlerites Maintain Its The Reds Who Have Opened Offensive The German in MOSCOW army has paid a terrific toll tanks and manpower as the price for vthe insignificant gains achieved in two days of bitter fighting in the 1943 summer of fensive on the OrelKmskBelgo rod fronl the Russians said Wednesday While acknowledging the loss of two unidentified towns near Belgorod at the southernmost end of the revitalized 165mile front the red army announced Tuesday night that in two days its artillery had smashed 1371 enemy tanks and shot down 311 planes while the German loss in dead exceeded 10009 The Russians counted the Ger man loss in tanks at 586 for the ttrst days fighting The midday communique Tuesday boosted the figure by 152 and Tuesday night the soviet information bureau add ed another 423 in a special com munique The regular midnight communi que later listed 110 German tanks destroyed in the OrelKursk sec tor Advices from the front indi z wave ntiet of armored unite and in fantry against the strongly de fended soviet positions making no appreciably headway The soviet Monitor in London reported that the customary Rus sian midday communique was not broadcast Wednesday The Ex change Telegraph in London said the Moscow radio had announced that the midday communique would no longer be broadcast but there was no immediate explana The attacks all along the front were strongly supported by the German air force and the Russians said they believed large forces of German planes had been shifted from western European bases for the drive The Russian midnight commun ique reported the destruction of 11 German planes and said 22 pilots had been captured One of the prisoners was said to have told red army officers that he was a member of the seventh detach ment of the first squadron dive bombers and had been based in Yugoslavia prior to the start of the new German offensive OX RUSSIAN FRONT Ar rows indicate sectors where the soviet information bureau re ported thousands of Germans killed Adolf Hitlers long expected summer offensive ap peared to have run into a bnzz saw of soviet defenses 91 JapAmericans Get Jobs in Iowa DES MOINES R Gibbs Des Moincs representative of ihe war relocation authority an nounced tha 91 JapancscAmeri cans have been placed in jobs in Line Pierced By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Berlin radio quoted a Ger man military spokesman as an nouncing Wednesday that the Germans had broken through the main soviet fighting line at sev eral points in the Kursk area cen ter of the Russian bulge below Moscow No details were given as to the distance of the claimed pen etration but it was stated that the breakthrough came during German counterattack The claim was made in a tratis ocean propaganda agency dis patch broadcast by the Berlin radio and recorded by the Asso ciated Press Earlier Berlin accounts of the eastern front fighting said the con flict was raging between Belgorod and Orel with the initiative firmly held by the Germans Kursk is midway betAveen those two points The salient of the soviet front northwest of BelgorodKursk south of Orel now is the scene of fighting continually increasing in violence a DNB military corre spondent was quoted as writing Tankswere playing an impor tant role it was said while in the air the strongest air formations were being engaged in fights in the Kursk area The Wednesday German high command communique had claimed penetration deep into Russian positions but did not give the exact points Berlin continued to drum out the theme that the Germans had not launched their summer offen sive but rather were reacting to heavy attacks launchedV by the red army The larjre number of air planes and tanks employed by the Soviets in the Kursk area present theater of major scale operations confirms the fact that the Soviets gathered a whole offensive army in this sector the Berlin radio quoted Berlin military quarters as saying Berlin military quarters il added do not go as far as speak ing of preparations for the begin ning of a soviet offensive but ex pressed the opinion that the So viets believing a German major attack was under vay were prompted to strike suddenly The Berlin radio said that soviet tanks engaged in the fighting in cluded new models partly Russian and partly Ameri can in origin GIRAUD COMES TO WASHINGTON TO MEET F R French Leader in North Africa Will Confer With Military Chiefs V A S H I N G T O N Henri Honore Giraud commander of French forces in north Africa and cochairman of ihe French committee for national liberation arrived by plane at Boiling field army air base in Washington it p ni central war time Wednesday Giraud came here to confer with President Roosevelt ami the BritishAmerican lenders on the war against the axis A 17 gun salute as Girauds piano touched the field marked the full military honors accorded the French general lie was wel comed by a reception committee headed by Admiral William D Leahy chief of staff to the presi dent and including liigli ranking officers of the United States armed forces ns well as members of the French army antl navy Accompanying Giraud were the generals three personal aides do camp Mnj Andre Beaufre and Maj Andre Poniatowski of the French army uml Lt Georges Virct of the French navy all of whom escaped from Brancc with Giraud in an allied submarine last Nov U twu days before allied troops landed in French north Africa Giraud also was accompanied by Lt Lepn E the United Statesarmy HE REMEMBERED HIS Mason Cifcyan overslept Wednesday morning and had to hurry to get lo work on time In the rush to get ready he overlooked his trousers but true Mason Cityan that he is he didnt forget his medal of honor to show that he has been keeping up to date in the purchase of war stamps which are to help build the Tokyo bombing carrier ShangriLa If WAVE Ethel Vessey who is checking up on sales of stamps meets him he knows he will get a free ticket to the Cecil for having his badge in order Lock photo U S Warships Shell Kiska in Attack CoOrdinated With Offensive in South Pacific Reveal American Light Cruiser Helena Lost in Kula Gulf Battle W A S H I N G T O N All American naval task force bom barded the Japanese base on Kiska isinnd Tuesday night the navy announced Wednesday in an attack apparently coordinated with the United Slates offensive against Japanese defenses in the south Pacific A navy communique report ins the action the north Pa cific also disclosed that the American cruiser lost in battle with Japanese forces in Kula gulf on the morning of July 6 was the 9700ton light cruiser Helena Tilt1 Helena was under com mand of Captain Charles Purccll Cecil of Louisville Ky Neither the fntc of the skipper nor the safety of individual crew mem bers was reported The next of Icin of the casual tics aboard the Helena will be notified as soon ys possible1 the navy said The cruiser which had been damaged at Pearl Harbor and was restored to service during the first 12 months of war in the Pa cific was the only announced American loss in the battle in which six Japanese ships were probably sunk and several others presumably four or more were damaged H A communique from General Douglas MatArthurs headquar ters Tuesday night had num bered Ihe damaged ships as four but Wednesdays navy commu nique said only that there were Senate Votes 33c Increase in Ceiling Price for Corn Resolution Sent to House Smith Says Situation Intolerable WASHINGTON sen ate Wednesday passed by voice vote and sent to the house a reso lution to permit the sale of corn at S140 a bushel 33 cents above the present price ceiling The resolluion was sponsored by Chairman Ellison D Smith D S Car of the senate agri culture committee It op posed by some senators on the NAZIS TIGHTEN RULE IN GREECE Death Is Ordered for Minor Infractions By JOHN A FARRIS LONDON UR Invasioniit lery German military authorities have proclaimed all Greece in a state of revolution and ordered the death penalty for even minor infractions of nazi regulations the Hellenic news service in Cairo reported Wednesday Simultaneously King Peler of Jugoslavia revealed in an intergrounds lhat il would completely view that he has asked United destroy the OPA corn price ceiling Stales authorities in London to anc ultimately force upward the send military missions to his ocPrice of poultry and dairy prod cupied land to aid Gen Draja Mikhailovitch patriot leader in laying the groundwork for co operation of his guerrilla army with allied invasion forces whci they land in the Balkans The decree proclaiming all Greece in a state oT revolution was issued July 1 by the Ger man military governor of north ern Greece following pitched battles between Greek guerril las and occupation forces strikes and sabotage a Cairo dispatch reported Mandatory death was ordered for instigators of disorders sabo teurs and any who attempt to in tertcre with nazi regulations Reports seeping in from Greece said lhat guerrillas had demol vumiui uci unavr ishcd the Asopos river wmch thcre 1S protection against an important communication link Sille any commodity left it in such a slate thai it could not be fixed for months Envisaging further coordina tion among resisting forces in the Balkans King Peler said he planned lo ask Russia as well a the United Stales lo send militar missions to work with General Mikhailovitch GEN HENRI GIRAUD in Washington Senator John A Dauahcr R Conn made a futile attempt to swerve corn slate senators from support of the measure by offer ing three amendments Each was rejected by voice vote One of them was a bill already pending on the senate calendar which would forbid sale of gov ernmentowned cotton al less than 23 cents and forbid a ceiling on cotton below 25 cents a pound Another Daanhcr proposal was to increase the price of crude oil 20 per cent as an incentive for new oil discoveries As a last resort Danaher posed to rcpcil section 1D of the emergency price control act under Smith demanding passage of his bill asserted This corn sit uation is simply intolerable He said the corn price ceiling was set by OPA bureaucrats who dont know a cornstalk from a fishing pole Democratic Leader Alben YV there seemed to large stocks of corn on the farms which arc not moving to market but he argued against price fixing by congress on a piecemeal basis The ad ministration wasreported consid ering a plan lo raise the ceiling Chicago basis from the present 5107 to about Senator Scoit W Lucas DI11 said he favored an increase in the corn ceiling price but urged ihal it go no higher than SI30 a bushel Lucas said Hint figure would permit hoggrowers lo de mand S1352 per hundredweight on their hogs He said SI40 com justify farmers demanding S1456 nsagainst the average of they now receive Senator Robert A Tnfl R insisted lhat S140 corn would inevitably increase the price of poultry and dairy feed antl result in n demand for higher poultry and dairy product1 A corn price increase under tcnta live administration plans might be offset by subsidization of manufacturers of poultry and dairy feed House Is Insistent in Stand for Abolition of Crop Insurance WASHINGTON house refused to budge Wednesday in its stand for abolition of the gov Using the MacArthur figure Japanese naval ship casualties of all types including sunk or dam aged now total 315 and the enemy has suffered nn additional loss of 33B noncombatant ships The comparable American figure for combatant ships including Ihe Helena is lOi vessels overdue and presumed lost destroyed to prevent capture or sunk Figures on American ships damaged an not available in their entiretv The report of the attack on K a was very brief H said only that the enemy was bombarded there and that his shore batteries did not return the fire V Kiska has been under aerial bombardment whenever weath er permitted recently but has not been attacked by surface ships in a long while Navy men on a quick check of previous war bulletins found no record of a surface attack later than last Aug 7 At lhat time warships shelled Kiskn shove installations and ships in the harbor simultaneous ly with the slart of Ihe invasion of the souiheaslern Solomon islands including Guadalcanal Wednesdays c o m in unique made clear that American planes were pounding out a steady rain Repaired After Pearl Harbor and Had Active Career WASHINGTON 9 00ton cruiser Helena which was iunk in the battle of Kula gulf n the central Solomon islands early July C wns one of the ships which Ihe Japanese damaged at Pearl Harbor on Dec 7 1941 she was subsequently repaired and returned to sea service and re jiortedly had an active career in the Pacific although details of ncr accomplishments have not been made public The light cruiser named for the city of Helena Mont was com missioned at the New York navy yard Scjii IB 1S39 She was equipped to carry four aircraft and her armament included 15 sixinch guns and eight fiveinch antiaircraft guns The skipper Capt Charles Piircell Cecil of Louisville Ky was a veteran of naval service He was graduated from the navy academy in IS1G and saw escort duty during the World war Before the present conflict started he was serving as execu tive officer of the naval training station at Great Lakes 111 but was detached from that duty June 1941 to lake command of L destroyer division at Honolulu In March 1942 he was given com mand of a destroyer squadron Captain Cecil won the navy cross for heroism as leader of a destroyer group assigned to a task force during Ihe battle of the Santa Cruz islands last October He maneuvered his ships into a defensive screen around an American carrier and his brilliant tactics and performance ot duty were credited with inflicting heavy losses on theenemy anc protecting American vessels Cecil assumed command of the Helena in November 1942 6NIPPON CRAFT PR06ABLYSUNK IN SEA VICTORY 4 Others Damaged as U S Loses Cruiser Communique ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN ernmcnt crop insurance program and put squarely up to the senate the proposition of backing clown I ULO vm i IcIITI of destruction over Japans south Pacific buses as part of the gen era offensive which bcgsn a week ago Thursday from insistence on the program or icing up a deficiency ap propriations bill By a standing vote of 123 to 52 lie house rejected a senate amendment to the S366000000 catchall deficiency bill lo allow 57818748 for continued operation of crop insurance On several previous occasions Ihe house had overwhelmingly volcd to abolish the program on the ground it cost more than it was worth rising temperature forenoon Chiang Declares Time Ripe Now to Strike at Weakening Japanese CHUNGKING simo Chiang KaiShek issued a call Wednesday lo the united na tions to strike at once in force against Japan because now he de clared is the opportxinc moment to reap great results in reducing he time and cost of final viclorv In a message to the people of the allied nations on the anniversary of the day six years ago that China I was attacked the war leader ns j scried Japan now is at her weakI YKAR AGO cst as her ieady resources are ani lUavimum Barklcy DKy admitted that I proaching a point of wfnimum Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Not much change in temperature Wednesday aft ernoon and Wednesday night Thursday IOWA Not much change in Icm peraturc Wednesday afternoon and Wednesday night rising temperature Thursday forenoon MINNESOTA Warmer west and north portions Wednesday night warmer Thursday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesdij 75 Minimum Tuesday night BO At 8 a m Wednesday 69 Rain trace 74 48 RATION BOARD IN WATERLOO QUITS Object to Order for Membership Increase WATERLOO entire Waterloo rationing board of nine members resigned Wednesday af er a demand by the office administration thai Us member ship be increased to 15 The resig nations were accepted by Albert and Thomas Kelly dis trict OPA representative Chief Clerk K H Wyanl also submitted his resignalion lo the DCS Jloines office Members of the Uualu fihoy 1C Cowin chairman R C Moore J Peter Olescn L E Fowler D C Knight Henry G Frank Elvin Ilorsluncl N D Jackson and R J Lichty The board in a statement said At all times the board has worked in close harmony In the belief that the efficiency and the harmonious relations now existing would be destroyed by an increase in membership a motion was passed by unanimous vote tender ing the resignation Buy War Savines Bonds DEMPSEY IS GIVEN DIVORCE Custody of Children lo Be Decided Later WHITE PLAINS N Y William H Jack Dempscy wa granted a divorce from his show Sirl wife Hannnli Williams Wee nesclay by Supreme Court Ret eree 1 Addison Young Young dismissed Mrs Demp soys counter suit for separati maintenance Referee Young said that he would decide the custody oi Dcmpseys two children Joan 8 and Barbara G later Dempscy is presently a licutcn nntcommnndcr t h e coast guard In his brief written decision Young declared that Dcmpscyi complaint thiit his wife had beer unfaithful on Nov 22 92 in hei Los Angeles apartment w a beyond doubt Demptey who raided the apart incut with three private electee lives charged that he saw his wif in the sonic bed with Bcnn VVoodall prize fight manager Young made no reference I Dempscys charges thai Lew Jcnk ins former lightweight champion also had been on intimate terms vilh Airs Dcmpsey Witnesses testified that Jenkins was seen hugging and kissing her several AUSTRALIA A United Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier 2 Divorces Wedding in One Day Provide Maharani for Indore RENO Ncv 1325089 people of Indore have a new American attractive 29 year old brunct It took two divorces and a in a make board were Mrs Euphemia Watt Crane the wife of the maharajnh who rules the central India state The slender 33 year old mahara R Holkar is his name was married to Mrs Crane Tues day night after each was granted a divorce It was his third mar riage He was divorced Tuesday morn ing from his maharani of five years Hie former Marguerite Lawler Branyen of Fargo N Dak once a riursc for his daughter The new maharani was divorced shortly before noon from Frank and Arthur Crane raid to be an cm ploye of an American aviation company in India States naval victory in the Solo sinking ol six Japanese warships and damaging of four others out of a cruiserde itroyer force at a cost of one announced Wednes day one week after the outbreak of lie current Pacific offensive The triumph recorded by guns of American ships which flashed in darkness of July 5S in the Kula gulf above New Georgia island was sketched In a communique from headquar ters of Gen Douglas MacArthur Although bearing out in clearer outline an earlier announcement from the navy in Washington that the Kula gulf battle definitely was an American victory Wednesdays communique left many details to be filled in including how many of the enemy ships hit were cruisers and how many destroyers One definitely was a destroyer blasted by 500pound bombs of American planes after it had beeix beached by damage suffered in the naval engagement Admiral William F Halseys south Pacific headquarters which has immediate direction of the Solomons operations announced Wednesday that the Kula gulf ac tion has ended and that United States forces continue to hold the initiative on land and in the air as well as on the sea Mopping up of resistance by frbund troops was said to be still in progress on Rcndova island and southern New Georgia A Japanese imperial headquar ters communique asserted Wednes day that Japanese naval forces sank one enemy cruiser and set another afire Sunday night in Kula gulf and that torpedo boals the following morning sank three war vessels The communique broadcast by the Berlin radio and recorded by the Associated Press made no mention of Japanese Japs have taken an other damned good licking Navy Secretary Frank Knox loJd cheering shipyard workers at Bremerton Wish The communique also bore the assuring news that American forces on Rendova island seized at the outset of the new drive in the central Solomons June 30 now have been reenforced and that frantic efforts of Ihe Japanese air force to checkmate the offensive by fresh raids on Australia New Guinea and our Solomons hold ings have boon broken tip Defeat of the Japanese naval forces Icf imperiled the most im mediate objective of the Solomons enemy air base of Munda on Mew Georgia Above it Bairoko anchorage main source of supply had been flattered by shells of United Stales warships in a bombard ment from the Kula gulf the nisht before the naval battle The U S destroyer Strong was lost during that action Below it ihe reenforced Amer ican garrison on Rendova has been shelling it from five miles away The fact Kula gulf is only 15 miles long and about eight miles across at its widest point made it obvious that the naval bitllc was between limited and com paratively light sea armament hi Washington unofficial com ment was that the decisive naval action of the present offensive in the south Pacific apparently is still lo be In air battles over the Solo mons fighting scene seven more Japanese planes were reported downed bringing enemy losses there alone to 164 Twentyseven enemy bombers with an escort of 21 zeros tried a daylight raid on Darwin Aus tralia causing slight damage Spitfires manned by Australians and British pilots downed five bombers and two zeros Seven spitfires were lost Fifteen Japanese planes raid ed the Nassau bay area 12 miles down the coast from Sala nuiia New Guinea where Americans landed June in another daylight stab but the enemy planes failed to inflict either damage or casualties the communique said   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication