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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 29, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             I pi NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY ANO ARTHJVES MOINES DES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION rmrn MASON CITY IOWA7TUESDAY JUNE 29 THIS PAMa CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS ECTIONS AGAIN 25 BOMBERS IN ATTACK OF RAF FAIL TO RETURN Nazis Report Another Serious Terror Raid With Damage Heavy By RICE YAHNER LONDON The KAF re turned in great strength Monday night to Cologne where 1000 bombers had blasted 300 acres of destruction in May 1942 and laid the pattern for the citybycity razing of German war industry In a doublebladed attack British heavy bombers also struck overnight at Hamburg submarine building center and continued the minelaying that official sources announced Monday had caused the sinking of at least 400 axis vessels since the war started Twentyfive bombers were listed as missing Thundering over the scene of the worlds first J000bomber raid for the 117th time the RAF left fires leaping up towards the Italians Say 175 Killed 300 Injured overhanging clouds The German high command called the Cologne allack an other serious terror raid against residential quarlers The German high command in iis regular communique broadcast by the Berlin radio and recorded fay the Associated Press asserted that The Cologne cathedral suf fered heavy damage from explo sive and incendiary bombs and that Colognes population suf feredlosses It was the second raid of the month aEaiast the treat Rhine Und industrial centerwnJchTihe have been reported work in avidly to restore The 1 bomber raid was reported to have driven out 200MO of the citys 800000 population and wreciid 250 factories The German communique re ported property damage in both Cologne and Hamburg and said 26 of the attacking bombers were shot doxvn Thickly populated parts of Cologne were said to have been destroyed as a result of a great number of explosive and in cendiary bombs The official bulletin gave no results of the attack on Ham burg last hit March 3 and an ail target nearly 100 limes since the war began In secondary night sweeps fighter command aircraft attacked enemy shipping in the channel damaging one small supply vessel and two escort craft the commu nique said At the same time in truder patrols attacked railway targets in France Monday nights raid was the eighth British assault on German targets in 10 days 2 was the target of the lbomber raid on May 30 hundred flying fortresses flyin roundtrip more than 1100 miles smashed the northern Italian port of Leghorn with several hundred tons of bombs Monday damaging a light cruiser and tour supply ships and creating havoc in oil tanks railway yards and indus trial plants The fourengined bombers ham mered at the city for nine con centrated minutes and returned home without loss allied head quarters announced They created such ruin that an official report said five hours after the raid the entire port was still so heavily covered by smoke that accurate inspection of Ihe damage xvas then impos sible Later however he report slated it was learned that all the storage tanks and an oil refinery were ablaze and that an inner inactive1 light cruiser and four supply ships in the harbor were damaged Little opposition was encountered and all the fortresses returned safely The Italians admitted very great damage at Leghorn and said lis persons were killed and 300 injured Meanwhile American medium bombers and fighters concen trated on airfields in Sardinia settiiiE buildings ablaze and poundirc dispersal areas and RAF Wellingtons raided San Giovanni near the toe of the Kalian mainland Photographs of the Leghorn raid showed one hit and two damaging misses on the cruiser and picture interpreters also re on the oil tanks the officialreport sai3 Also hir the the WestenT opln to Ky Byrne of Rye e a 78 Miss Byrne shot an 86 Monday fi t 1942 Monday nights attack it was believed may have delivered al most as ereat a bombload be cause the RAFs latest planes carry a greater weight Also many of the squadrons in last years attack were medium bombers The twin foray by the British bombers followed up a twoday attack Monday by strong forma tions of American flying fortresses on two enemy targets in occupied submarine yards at 5t Nazaire and an enemy fighter airdrome at BeaumontLeRocer 30 miles southwest of Rouen by numerous bombs were railroad lines leading lo llle marshalling yards and tracks east of the city a bridge sheds a stor age depot or two Hits were also scored near the iron foundry and torpedo factory Nearly 100 fortresses raided Leghorn 360 miles north of Rome on May 28 in their longest combat flight from north African bases up to that time Medium bombers ranging over Sardinia encountered heavy en emy opposition both from tile ground and in the air New attacks upon Rcggio Cal abria and Messina also were re high Airfields in the ObliaVena fiorta district in northeast Sar dinia were attacked by medium bombers BZ5 Mitchells es corted b P38 Hshtninys dropped explosives on he bar racks administrative buildings lunears and dispersal areas in the AlzheroFertilia district on the northwest coast In other forays B26 maraud Of PLEADS GUILTY TO SPY COUNT Engineer Admits Aiding Nazis to Get Money NEW YORK PjEvwin Harry De Spretter the second prisoner arrested by the FBIon charges of collaborating in espionage work for the German liigh command pleaded guilly when arraigned Tuesday before a U S commis The bespeclacled engineer calmly entered his plea after be ing informed of his rights Then Commissioner Martin C Epstein ordered him held for action by a and P 4n nngs and P40 warhawks attacked air to the south The Wellington night raiders Such allied air blows on the nazicon ir zcon Vichy radio declared Tues day m a broadcast recorded by the have thiKnn e mae more than 16000 persons homeless The report also said that fatal casual I5 1940 to June 21 1943 Berlin asserted that 11 of the i n es i Vu nSu raiders flumped their load on the San Gio vanni marshalling yards A dozen enemy aircraft were destroyed in flic days operations he war bulletin said and two al ed Panes were listed as missing Contrasts in Weather Provided by Iowa as Mercury Takes Plunge DES MOINES WTalfc fbout changeable weather Sunday H was so hot in Iowa you could have sizzled a steak on a sidewalk Monday night it was so chilly that any Jowan delved into the mothballs for winter pajamas 1 read Ernest Frederick Lehmitz wilh whom De Spritter was charged with working in sending vital in formation to the nazis entered a similar plea of guilty Monday when arraigned before Epstein This prisoner Acling U S Attorney T Vincent Quinn said at the arraignment has made a complete confession concernm his activilics He said he got inlo tins work because he needed money and lhat he realized the consequences if he were Like Lehmitz De Spreller who is Su was calm and self possessed during the proceedings The arraignment came a short time after E E Conroy chief of the New York federal bureau of investigation announced the ar rest of the consulting engineer on charges of aiding Lehmitz in feed ing the axis war machine with in tormation concerning Americas war preparations De Spretler a consulting neer for national defense plaifts educated at University of with ral information Reports 14 Nazi UBoats Sunk in Last 2 Weeks OTTAWA Mac Donald British high commissioner to Canada said Tuesday at least 14 enemy submarines had been sunk in thejast two Aveeks and predicted that the allied assruliah Europe would starl very soon We have had a dead submarine served up for breakfast every day for Ihe past fortnight Mac Donald said His slatement was added evi dence of allied ascendency in the critical battle of the Atlantic which Prime Minister Churchill said recently the allies were win ning Recent reports from London have said submarines have been sunk at a rate of better thar one a day for the past Iwo months a rate faster than the German abil ity to replace them MacDonald told a press confer ence that the allies obviously are approaching another great crisis of the war He said there might be compar atively small assaults on Ger many arid German occupied terri tory which should not be regarded immediately as theopening of a second front The commissioner said the allied antisubmarine efforts had been so successful in recent months that the tables had been turned com pletely on axisboats in the North Atlantic He said this condition was a necessary prelude to allied assault on Europe Another was the complete conquest of North Africa with its corrollary shorten ing of Ihe sea route to the middle east he said and 1 oraon and olher data concerning national de fense with the intention of having Lehmitz forward it to Conroy said egree read ings over the weekend the mer M Monday night It the state achmy v vurtL 11 or tne I AV was a chilly 60 American fourengined planes m Moines at 9 a m Tuesday were shot down riuriner Mondays state hich was ftQ t There wl attacks reported six missing Report 7500 Belgians Shot Since Occupation LONDON WMore than 7500 Belgian patriots have been shot by the Germans since the occupation the Belgian government in exile said Tuesday quoting the under ground newspaper Linsoumis A Belgian Quisling Henry Labro chief of Flemish national cialisl group 8t Schaerbeek Brus sels has been killed bj patriots the government said precipitalion were SCHUITE KITES HELD DUBUQUE v c i i ciay for ProfBernard W fsf 8VndeIy fcnown 1 o5103Professor Schultc came to Petersburg Iowa in 1880 trom his native Germany and sub sequently taught music in Iowa Missouri and Nebraska Burial will be at Sidney STOLEN CAR FOUND WA car stolen from T R Tobiassen of Monticello nf ih ivas found in umin Minn Monday Two ints bearing prison numbers of ers o and Eugene who escaped from the Anamosa reformatory were found in ne car 6 ATTACKS MADE ON KISKA Army Planes Also Raid Little Kiska WASHINGTON more smashing aerial attacks were made against Japanese installations on Kiska island in the Aleutians Sun day the navy reported Tuesday and Monday army planes followed up with a raid against that island and nearby little Kiska In the South Pacific meanwhile a navy communique reported American planes bombed a smali Japanese naval disposition in the central Solomons but did not ob serve resulls The aclion appeared to be of little consequence on the basis of a nnvaj spokesmans in terpretation He said that while he did not know the makeup of the enemy force it might have been only a small group such as a de stroyer and cargo ship or a squad ron or torpedo boats on Kiska MacDonald said pleas for a sec ond front were natural and ex pectable but the decision was made not to act prematurely or until all reasonable efforts had been completed lo mnke Ihe ns sault succeed Now preparations are well along and it is unlikely that we will have to wait very long the commissioner said MacDonald attributed success in the antisubmarine war to im proved and increased air protec tion more cargo ships and escort vessels to convoy them and to in ventions aiding in locating the U boats NEW STRIKES IN ALABAMA COAL PITS REPORTED BacktoWork Move in Pennsylvania Regions Gains Some Momentum By UNITED PRESS New strikes broke out in th Alabama soft coal fields Tuesdaj seriously threatening steel pro duction in the state while oacktowovk movement in th Pennsylvania bituminous region gained some momentum anclVir Uiiilly all miners in other larg soft coal producing areas were h the pils The new walkonls in Alabama which brought the total of unitec mine workers coal diggers idle in the slate to an estimated 11000 men developed when 120 men on the morning shift at th two mines of Woodward Jroi company Who were working Mon day failed to report Tuesday mine of the Tennessee Coallroi and Railroad cbmpanv whicl worked Monday also was Tuesday The Republic Steel corpora tion whose three mines were idle was expected to announce suspension of all steel produc tion in A la because of the futl Two at the com panys blast furnaces in Birm ingham hive been banked two others at Gadsden are threat its coke production down o lesV ihaii 30 per cent of normal In central Pennsylvania hotbed rank and file revolt against UMW Head John L Lewis or ders to return lo work in the unions deadlocked wage negotia tions mine operators dropped oft Tuesday with only about half of the 45000 miners of UMW districl 2 working in Ihe pits Of Pennsylvanias total 115000 soft coal miners it was estimated that 40000 remained on strike The statesanthracite miners scheduled meetings to ballot 01 backtowork proposals Only 10000 of the stales 80000 anthracite miners worked Monday but united mine workers leaders Pedieted that al least several groups would vole to return at meetings scheduled Tuesday Thus far 12000 of the hard coal work ers have voted against returning until a new contract has been ne gotiated The anthracite workers have been demanding the same bene fits sought by the bituminous miners West Virginia the nations lar gest soft coal producer with 130 000 miners and Illinois with 38 000 reported JOO per cent com pliance with the backtowork or der Monday In Ohio all but 1 300 reported All but lflno wenl bick m Kentucky and they were Marvin Jones Americans Will Have Healthful Diet Declares People in U S Eating Better Than Ever Before Buy War Savings Bonds and 9o sa rase 22 the number of separate air actions earned out over that enemy North Pacific outpost in a lourday period Weather Report FORECAST IOWA Continued cool Tuesday afternoon Tuesday night and forenoon MINNESOTA Continued cool Tuesday night and Wednesday forenoon except not quite so cool extreme northwest and slightly cooler with scattered frost northeast portion Tues day night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 70 Minimum Monday night 48 At 8 a m Tuesday 54 VEAR AGO Maximum Minimum vi i volyed in a local dispute over va cation pay Resentment against Ihe backto worfc order and President Roose veUs work or fighf proposal still was running high in Alabama where most of the large soft coal mines remained closed Bur War Savings Bonds and stamps from your GlobeGazett earner boy WASHINGTON jude Marvin Junes took oath of of fice Tuesday as the nations third war food administrator in seven months and declared that he is confident civilians will certainly have enough to assure a healthful diet Jones takes the place vacated by Chester C Davis The Roosevelt administration in letting Davis go showed new determination to make stabilization of prices a lop consideration in Die nations food program V There is talk about food shortases Jones said This bus created fear on the part of some of our people hat they and thfir children may go hungry We may not throughout the war have all we want and everything we prefer but we will certainlly have enough to assure a health ful diet t The new food chief said loo little emphasis has been placed on one important fact the American people today arc eating more and better than ever before Jones was sworn in at his new office by Chief Justice Richard Obstructionist ITTER DISPUTE OF 2 OFFICIALS FLARES FORTH CHESTER DAVIS Whaloy of the U claims a tribunal S court of from which Jones has aken a leave of absence Those witnessing the oath taking included Secretary of Agriculture Wickard first war food admin istrator who was succeeded in March by Davis Davis resigna tion was accepted by President Koosevelt Monday fn a slatement issued at the time lie tookthe oath Jones indicated lhat he lakes over wilh no new or addilional powers Davis had said m his letter of resignation that his authority was insufficient o enable him to meet his respon As war food administrator Jones said I expect to Jo Ihe best job I can wilh the tool at hand Jones a former congressman and lawyerfarmer listed liiesc as he major needs for meeting war food requirements A full allotment of materials for lew farm machinery supplies re pair parts shelter and storage as veil as processing facilities A sufficient supply of farm la bor to produce and harvest crops Ample supplies of seed feed ertilizor and credits lo meet farm rs needs Assurance ol a fair return to armers This relurn Jones said must be related to other prices in aimess to all The food administrator said he expects to counsel wilh rep resentatives of the farm organi zations and also with represen tatives of industry on the food program if Full use should be made he aid of state countv and com munity organizations Food k no reduced in offices in Washington is produced in the far stretches this big country No program an be effective unless it has the upport of Ihe American people on wartime basis The resignation of one of Davis opranking aides Jesse W Tapp s associate war food administra tor was tendered Jones Tucsdaj Tapp s expected to return lo th vice presidency ihe Bank c America a western iuslHution Jones an affable Texan with long agriculture background in eluding legislative leadership i pulling AAA crop control am other farmaid legislation on th statute books moved into the jol with a record as a slaunch sup porter of President Roosevelt policies His appointment to replace Davis who himself was drafted 111March to settle differences which had developed amont ad ministration officials was taken to mean lhat future food nro srams would be cut lo patterns designed above all else to pro vide food at present or lower prices This change in food bosses camt after Davis had offered his res ignalion at some near future dat wilh the explanation lhat he did not agree wilh the policy of pul ting consumer prices above al other considerations parliculnrli when it involved the use of sub sidies and when consumers have as he said excess spending powei Davis also said thai while he was responsible for meeting food needs other persons were exercis ing authority over broad policic nnd issuing orders affecting his responsibility There were a lnrsc mmibcr participants in the formation o those policies you know he said bu he declined to name them He likewise declined at a press conference following the white house announcement of his resig nation to comment on Mr Roose velts letter in which the presi dent after defending the sub sidy program said It would be unfair to you to insist that yoi remain in your position when you feel that all things consid ered you cannot wholeheartedly support a program to hold dowi Ihe cost of V y Davis who indicated a readi ness lo resume his dulies as president of the federal reserve bank at St Louis said I had hoped lo have an op portunity to discuss the whole problem with Ihe president But lhat opportunity did not devel op It probably is just as well was a reluctance on Hie part Claude R Wickard lo operate un der the setup againsl which Davis objected lhat led to Wickard be ing replaced as Ihe first food ad ministrator Controversies over food policies have marked administration war programs since Ihe beginning At the bollom of many of hem has een the question of farm and re ail prices when the first price conlrol law was being debated in congress Wickard urged that Ihe official responsibility for produc sccrelary of agriculture have conlrol of prices He argued that price was a deli cate mechanism which could be used to encourage or discourage production President Roosevelt and con fess took a counter view hold 8 of all prices hould be cenlcr in one agency he offife of price administration U arrow near Athens planes of the CRESTON UP petc Carne Jr 17 of Shannon City owa was drowned Monday in UcKmley lake shortly after the ire guard had gone to supper arns was married about a month go to Barbara McConnell a school mate di Secretary Jones Says Statement by Vice President Has Matice WASHINGTON bitter ispute between two of the high est officials in the administration broke into the open Tuesday Vici President Wai I a c e accusing Secret nry of o m m c r c e Jesse Jones of obstru c t i o n ist tactics and Jones accusing Wallace of malice and nisstatements Wallace a s h a i rm a 11 of Ihe board of economic war fare WALLACE declared m a long and sharply worded statement for the senate appropriations committee that as chairman of the recon struction finance corporation had obstructed the BEW in Its single minded effort to help shorten this war by securing adequate stocks of strategic materials The vice president saw in Jones attitude a timid busi Procedure The KJC supplies funds for BEW buymr of strategic 7 Jones replied in this statement o he piess lelcase Siven out by Mr Wallace Tuesday s filled with malice and misstatements He rmkcs two serious charges 1 That HFC had failedin the Jurchase and stockpiling of stra egic and critical malerials The facts are thai not more than 10 peicent of our purchases and commitments for these materials have been ini tiated by BEW RFC commit ments for for eign purchases have been ap pro x i m a tely jOOO 000 of which not more than 10 per cent was originated b y BEW We have actually r e coived and paid for materials to the v a 1 u e of of which less than per cent can be credited to BEW niliative 2 That RFC and I have ob truded and delayed programs of lievelopmenl and procurement by BEW Therehas been 10 serious delay by us of any ita program I will answer the stalement in eail and be glad to have a com iiltec ol congress fully investi ale the facts Wallace said Jones had created false impression in testimony efore Hie congressional economy ommiUce headed by Senator yrd D Va It is lime lo prevent further armful misrepresenlallons of this aluie Wallace said adding Althovigh the presidenton pnl 13 1942 transferred lull onlrol over Ihe programming of mpoilcd stralegic materials from ie reconstiuction finance cor oration o the board of economic velfare which operates under oarii directives received from ic war production board Mi ones has never fully accented hat authority Pfe and his personnel down the ne have thrown a great astacles in the way of our exer se of the powers given us to arry out wartime assignments ome of Ihcsc obstructionist tac cs have been minor and annoy g ami some have been of major onsequcncc in this job of Wazini otal war In his statement Wallace dis issed the stockpiling of variouj ralcgic materials He said con had made funds available r such a purpose as far back al 939 and lhat in Ihe summer of 940 the RFC was given funcU ockpiling From the summer nnlil well past Dec 7 Wallace said the rccM ran finance corporatiw iiamally so far as the L ieW was concerned he stockpiles directed by   

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