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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 28, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 28, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                OF V HISTOKV AND ARCHIVCS MOJKE A NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION ITTTTTri VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND tmrrtD PfttSS TOLL LEASED WIRES HVE CENTS A MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY JUNE 28 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 224 2 AIRDROMES NEAR ATHENS BOMBED Progress Slow in Miner BacktoWork Move 156000 STILL IDLE IN VITAL COAL INDUSTRY Many in Pennsylvania Fields Fail to Go Back to Diggings PITTSBURGH men trooped back to the mines in the Appalachian coal region Monday but the task of restoring full shifts in some sections especially the great Pennsylvania producing field took on the aspect of a slow process The gotowork campaign put more miners on the job in Ohio Kentucky Illinoisand western Pennsylvania but the situation in the anthracite fields of eastern Pennsylvania became worse with a majority of the hard coal miners idle Many Alabama miners also failed to fa back Although the figures could not he definitely conclusive because of individual absenteeism ami other factors Mondays report from the field indicated at least 156OOD miners oJ the countrys hall million were idle Last weeks estimates placed tlie num ber at more than 200000 Out of the 200000 miners in Pennsylvania it was unofficially estimated from union and opera tor sources that 110000 were still idle This included 58000 in the vhard coal fields and 52000 in the soft coal fields In Ohio united mine workers 4 leaders reported all except 2330 of its 15000 miners back in tlie pits with the expectation all would be back Tuesday Only 3200 worked in Ohio last week end On Sunday many union meetings were held in the Ap palachian field at which scores of locals voted to go back lo work and scattered reports from the Pennsylvania soft coal field save an increase in the number of men working but the captive steel mines still were shortbanded The United States Steel cor poration reported operations better at its mines but none of the four Jones and Laughlin Steel corporation mines worked A J and L spokesman said pickets prevented workers from entering one mine President James Mark of the big Central Pennsylvania dislrici said incomplete reports showec 15000 out of 45000 miners were working an improvement over last week by several thousand Kentucky reported 51600 of its miners Itain of more than 7000 over last week Union officials ex plained that local situations prevented the return at some mines In western Kentucky 450ft men were out vaca tion protesting they received only S20 vacation pay instead of agreed upon Indiana reported 6500 in the mines out of 8000 a decrease o from last week The go lo wort call soundec through many mining villages Sunday in the great Appalachian region base of the industry anc scores of local units of the united mine workers UMW voted to resume their jobs in the soft coal mines Fullscale operations were pre dicted by UMW leaders and others in most of the stales includin the vast bituminous coal area o1 West Virginia with its 130000 miners Unofficial estimates last week placed the number of idle min ers in the country at slightly over 2MttO leaving more than SMfttt on the job in he na tions underground pits Almost threefourths of the men absent from work since June 20 when a twoweek tiuce agreed upon by lie UMWs policy com mittee expired are employed in Pennsylvanias bituminous and anthracite fields They refused along with some thousands of others in Illinois Kentucky Ala bama Ohio West Virginia Vir ginia and other states to observe an order from the policy commit tee June 22 to resume production with the government in full charge of the mines Sundays upsurge in work sen timent was spirited in West Vir 2ustomers Leaving blazing Amusement Demand Refund KANSAS CITY musemenl park was ablaze and danayer Harry Duncan was busy eiding 12000 patrons lo safety Then Die dance hall customers termed his office demanding a efund Think of il Jie shouted Were giving them a million dol ar show and they want their nOney back The park was damaged lo the of Duncan esti KING SAMPLES ARMY MESSOn a tour of American army camps in North Africa King George of England samples U S food at an informal lunch eaten from mess kits On the monarch s right is Lt Gen Mark Clark while to his left sits Maj Gen George Patton U S A Sir James Briggs has his back to camera ginia Local unions throughout the southern fields adopted reso lutions to pick up their tools again and produce all the coal neces sary for the prosecution of the war Ickes U SNot to Nationalize Mines WASHINGTON Ickes told the house ways and means committee Monday the gov ernment has no desire and no Plans for the nationalization of the coal industry and hopes to re turn the mines to private owner ship at the earliest possible mo ment He was unable fo say he added when return would be possible but said the government which took over the mines during the recent strike would seize the first op portunity to icturn them to private ownership That opportunity he added would come when there is rea sonable assurance that the min ers would work for private own ers or when the workers and the operators signed a contract Ickes whom President Roose velt placed in charge of govern ment operation of the mines on May 1 was called to testify on legislation to extend the life of the Gufley coal act designed to sta bilize the bituminous coal industry through a system of minimum prices on a regional basis He said he favored extension of the act which will expire Aug 23 unless continued by congress Pending legislation would continue the act until two years after the end of the war 7 Children Critically Injured When Plane Crashes on Beach Area HUNTItVGTON BEACH Cal children were in crit ical condition and 42 other persons were recovering from cuts and burns Monday as army officials planned an investigation into the crash of a burning P38 fighter plane in a crowded beach area The most seriously injured were Faith 8 Frank 6 and Rosalva Borrega a and Mary 13 liudv 9 Ruben 6 and Frances Silva 4 children of two Mexican families who were picnicking when the pilotless plane struck the sand a short distance away and exploded The plane hurled blazing debris and gasoline in all directions and the blast knocked many persons from their feet Witnesses said the plane was flying in a formation when it burst into flnme The pilot bailed out ami landed a mile away from the popular beach area After vis iting the scene of the crash he was taken to the Santa Ana army air base DIED OF HEART ATTACK SIOUX CITY Smith 16 of Laurel Nebv at first believed to have drowned in a swimming pool here died in the pool as the result of a heart at tack a physicians report showed Monday Weather Report MASON FORECAST CITY Cooler Monday afternoon and Monday night continued cool Tuesdav fore noon IOWA Cooler Monday afternoon and Monday night continued cool Tuesday forenoon MINNESOTA Cooler south and cast portions slightly cooler northwest portion Monday night and Tuesday forenoon liN MASON CITY GlobeGazelle weather statistics Maximum Sunday 95 Minimum Sunday night 62 At 8 a m Monday 65 Rain 136 inches YEAR AGO Maximum 80 Minimum 65 Precipitation 08 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 98 Minimum Saturday night 74 At 8 a m Sunday 80 YEAR AGO Maximum 70 Minimum J M KILLED BY TRAIN S1GOURNEY vouth identified as Robert Arndt 18 of Dodge Wis was killed when struck by a Milwaukee railroad train while he walked along the tracks near Ollie Iowa Saturday night Sheriff E E Trcmmel said Armlts companion Gerald Nytes 1C tokl him they had run away froma training school at Union Grove Wis COOL WEATHER COVERSSTATE Mercury Dips After Climbing Above 100 DES MOINES weather prevailed tiP Coo throughou Iowa Monday after the mercuvj climbed above the 100degrei mark Sunday for the first timi this season The mercury hit 101 degrees a Onawa Sunday and readings ii the high 90s were common How ever showers brought a quic drop in temperatures and Sunda nights lowest reading was 55 a Inwood Heaviest rainfall was 25 inches at EsthervilJe Waterlo had 195 inches Jefferson 1 Joiva Falls 170 Forest City 16 and Mason City 130 In DCS Moincs a sudden siorir Sunday niylit caused the niercui to drop seven degrees in five min utcs before the downpour Prcci pitation in downtown DCS Moinc totaled 84 of an inch while a the airport south of the city i amounted to 112 inches lJjcal olli ces of the U S employment serv ice Monday were in receipt of in structions urging that special em phasis be placed on finding tem porary summer jobs for teachers A bulletin urging that places be found for teachers during the va cation period was issued by Frank M Rang Jr regional war man power commission director al Minneapolis YORK IS NAMED IOWA GOP CHIEF Little Businessman Chosen by Committee DES MO1NES little businessman who is just the op posite in physical stature is the new Iowa state republican chair man Willis York 50 Madrid Iowa manufacturing c h e m i s t was elected chairman Sunday by the GOP stale central committee He succeeds Fred Gilbert of Stale Center who retired from the committee to become a state highway commissioner Yorks little business classi fication arises from the fact that company employs 15 persons it manufactures about 200 items including household extracts and stock remedies He is one of the biggest men in Iowa politics He is 6 feet 3 Vi inches tall weighs 285 pounds and is bald The new chairman will serve at least a year until the GOP state convention next summer and perhaps may be at the helm throughout the 1044 campaign Interim chairmen usually arc elected to another term at suc ceeding conventions York has been active in re publican politics for many years but has been sixth district coro roitteeman only since 1942 when he was selected to succeed Dwirht Rider of Fort Dodge who left the committee to be come a district judge Klectcd vice chairman fo fill the vacancy left by tlie resignation o Mrs Vcrn Moss of Centevvillc was Mrs Gertrude Wilharm Sumncr housewife Her husband who is Bremer county GOP chair man operates a produce business She is third district committee woman and president of th Bremer county Republican Worn ens club Mrs Moss continues a fourth district committcewoman Both York and Mrs Wilhain were elected on the firsl ballo although it was reported that the chairmen encountered some stern opposition from R E White o Oltumwa fourth district commit teeman Mrs Margaret Hinder man of Wapello first district com mittecworaan reportedly receive some support for vice chairman York has livrd in since 1928 lie was born in Minne apolis in 1893 The family moved to San Francisco while he still was an infant He lived in San Francisco until 1926 He was in the manufacturing chemist business California and in Memphis Tenn where he lived from 1926 to 1928 I was active in republican poli tics out west be recalled Poli tics always has been my hobby He was a delegate lo the repub lican national convention in 1910 He served four years as Boon county chairman The Yorks have one daughter Yvonne 12 LARGE FIRES ON KISKA STARTED NU S RAIDS Air Attacks Believed to Be Prelude to Landing Attempts WASHlNGTpNi American oinbors blasliiiR Kiska in seven aids started larjjc fires in the apanese camp area and damaged n t iaircraft emplacements at hat Aleutian islands enemy out ost the navy reported Monday The attacks by heavy and me Hiin bombers escorted by swift ighting plancs came in a batter ig scries on Saturday nnd raugbl lo IB the number of times Ciska had been struck in three BRITISH REPAIRING OWN bulldozer op crated by a British soldier clears away some of the wreck age wrought by allied bombers in the dock area on the island of Pantclleria Engineers are rapidly turning the former Italian possession into a base to be used against the axis fr 3rd Daughter Born to Actress Joan Bennett HOLLYWOOD SciecJ Actress Joan Bennett now ha three daughters Her third Stephanie born Saturday nigh is Miss Bennetts first child b Film Producer Walter Wagner to whom she was wed in January J940 Diana 15 and Melinda 8 s her daughters by previous mar riages to John Fox and Filn Writer Gene Markcy respective ly nys The navy ilsp reported six outh Pacific aerial attacks with imaging hits al Japanese bases I Kahili Rckatn Bay Munda rila and Ballule in the Solomon slands Six shattering raids on Kiska ast Friday damaged the main apanese camp area there the lavy reported Sunday There ivas itlle resistance to the assaults in liciiting the enemy garrison nl eady may be feeling the pinch of he Atlu blockade Naval observers expressed bc ief the United States forces were indertnking a campaign to imino lilize the Japanese garrison on Kiska as a prelude lo landing op erations The Friday raids fol lowed jbree air Attacks Thursday Kiska is the last enemyheld oothold in the American chain n the north Pacific U S Bombers Hit Targets in France LONDON large force of United States heavy bombers at tacked targets in France late Monday The first brief announcement from headqunrtors of the Euro pean theater of operations of the United States army did not specify Imgets and gave no details on losses ind atr victories The action part of a round theclock aerial offensive of heightening intensity followed a morning sweep in which RAF spitfires and typhoons sank two German ships forced another to beach and stopped three others off the Dutch coast The drum of the multiengincd machines continued for several minutes us the bit formation headed toward the continent be tween Boulogne and Calais Coastal watchers said the force apparently had struck deep in land because no bombs were heard oil this side The RAF employed typhoons and hurricanes agninst the Ger man convoy found sailing in a line the air ministry said These vessels were attacked in waves and the final wave of fly ers also attacked ships believed to be tugs trying to aid the con voy One HAF plane was lost the air ministry announced in contrast to the German high commands claim that nine were shot down The Germans also asserted that the convoy suffered only minor damage US Battleships Are Reported in Mediterranean LONDON A Reuters re port from Stockholm said Mon day that United States battle ships have reached the Mediter ranean and battle fleet joined the British The report quoting the Scandi navian Telegram bureau came a day after the Italian fleel was reported to have sailed into ilie open for a fight or perhaps for a safer refuge from allied bombs pounded from two sides of the mainland The Italian fleet sailing reported also by Reuters quoting an Algiers radio report credited to newspaper Arriba the Spanish Neither story had any official confirmation Bur War Savings and Inm GtobeGuelle carrier REDS GAIN ON KARELIAN FRONT Advance Northwest of Moscow Also Reported MOSCOW UP Advances by Red army troops on the Karelian front facing Finland and against German forces northwest of Mos cow were reported Monday by the soviet high command Seven hun dred enemy soldiers were killed Both pushes involved seizure of important local strategic points They came during reconnaissance by both sides Exchange Telegraph in London heard Brussels broadcast a Berlin dispatch telling of new fighting in a sector cast ol Kharkov where the Russians were said to have attacked yesterday with tank sup port The fighting in the Kharkov referred to by Moscow been stressed for some time by the axis Berlin radio earlier described four minor thrusts and said the Russians were massing guns near Belgorod 45 miles cast of Kharkov Fn one sector of the Karelian front in the far north red army units drove enemy troops from a stronglyheld height seizing the post after handtohand fighting killing 300 Germans A Finnish report evidently re fering to this fight said the Rus sians attacked in the Rukajaervi sector northwest of Lake Onega after an artillery barrage The soviet attack was said to have boon successful but the Finns re portedly recovered the position Boy WmT and GhbeGtxelle URGES INCREASE IN ALLOWANCES Reynolds Offers Bill Backed by Army Navy WASHINGTON UP man Ilobert R Reynolds D N Car of the senate military af fairs committee Monday intro duced a bill to raise from S12 to the governments monthly al lowance for the first child of any enlisted man in the armed forces The amount for each additional child would be increased from S10 to Sll Reynolds said he introduced the bill on behalf of the committee and said it was indorsed by wai and navy department officials Senator Edwin C Johnson D Colo 1 membernf the commit tee estimated its tola cost a 5393000000 a year H was introduced in expecta tion that prePenrl Uurbor fath ers might be drafted into tin armed forces Recent events liavL cast some doubt as to how soon that will be done The bill also would boost gov ernment allowance for dependent parents grandchildren brothers and sisters of enlisted men It would give technical master and staff sergeants In the the comparable navy choice of selecting the allowances in lieu of the S3750 commutation of quarters fee they mnv receive when they are not furnished liv ing quarters The bill would nol thnnsc the S50 a month now act aside dor wives of service from Ih mans pay and S2B from the government But it would boost from S20 lo S42 the monthly al lotment for a child of a service man without wife and from S10 to SH the allotment for addition al children in such cases The bill also would have the government pay the entire al lotmenffor a mans first month of service eliminating the normal deduction from his pay for that month NAPLES LASHED BY POWERFUL AIR OFFENSIVE Threat of Invasion on East Mediterranean Revived With Raids By ALTON L BLAKESLEE Associated Press War Editor Lashing at axis targets in Greece for the second time in a vcek American heavy bombers lammerecl two airdromes near Athens Sunday it was disclosed londay and Naples was battered again Saturday in the powerful jllied air offensive overspreading he Mediterranean The American heavies of the middle east command rained bombs upon the Elevsis and Hassan airdromes dramatically reviving the threat of allied in vasion in he eastern Mediter ranean and creating heavy damage with a thick carpet of bombs RAF Wellingtons from the African command de ivcrecl tlie punch at Naples hil docks and industrial areas in that rail hub of southern Italy an attack following three ght blows in 36 hours upoii Messina ferry terminal and sup ply city of Sicily The heavy Mediterranean ac tions brovight frank warnings from Italian newspapers that in vasion was imminent The new raids upon Greek air dromes followed a 50piane at tack Thursday on Sedes airfield at Salonika To the invasion conscious axis strategists attempt ing to build lip their strength in the Balkans was left the decision whether the bombings were the customary prelude to attack or feint to hide operations else where The Paris radio and Reuters reported passage of German landing craft through the Bos phorus 011 the Black sea en route to the Aegean The size of the new raid on Naples was notrdisclosed and the Italians admitted only slight dam age Eight axis planes attacking allied shipping were downed Sat urday allied headquarters said The Algiers radio quoting a Spanish newspaper reported that the Italian fleet hud sailed on an offensive operation but this was nol confirmed carrier tar DAVIS QUITS AS FOOD CHIEF BULLETIN WASHINGTON fP Presi dent Roosevelt accepted Mon day the resignation of Chester C Davis as war food adminis trator and appointed Marvin Jones as his successor Young Man and Girl Are Sitting Out OPAs Pleasure Driving Ban MARION Va OP A young man and his girl are sitting oul the OPAs pleasure driving ban When his gasoline was exhausted the young man pushed his car to a street curb Since then he anc his girl come out each night and sit in the sedan One hy one the tires have gone flat The young man says its a pleasure even i its not driving leaflets Dropped U V S Bombers CAIRO IP U S ninlV air orcc liberators shattered axis langars pitted runways and tartecl fires at two airdromes near Sunday in a powerful lol owup to the Thursday raid at alonika which openod the trans Mediterranean aerial offensive gainst German and Italian hold ngs in the Balkans il was an lounccd Monday Hifth exivtosives were loosed effectively al the air fields nf both Elevsis 10 miles west of Athens and Ilassani southeast of the capital and allied leaflets were showered over the entire area The leaflets carried a tribute Vom President Roosevelt lo the ighting courage and spirit of the Greek people and expressed hope that the day of their deliverance vrs not too far away It also told the Greeks of the presentation of an antisubmarine patrol ship the PC622 to the overnmentine x i 1 e of King George II by the United Stales under leaselend arrangements June 10 Despite savage efforts by de fense forces to break up the raids tlie fourengmed1 bombers ex ecuted their missions and returned without a loss At both targets our aircraft were attacked by large formations of enemy fighters and lightcr bombcrs the latter making unsuc cessful attempts at aerial bomb ing said Hie ninth air force com munique Seven enemy aircraft were destroyed with eight others listed as probably destroyed Three large hangars were hit and set afire at Elevsis the fly ing field west of the Greek cap ital Other bombs burst on the runways and near administrative buildings and the whole surface of the airdrome appeared to be covered with bursts the bulletin said At trie story was the same Hangars were lelt burning and the entire field anc western dispersal area were covered with bursts Five grounded planes were observed in flames Other tires broke out northwest oi   

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