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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 26, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 26, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OCPANTUCNT OF AND ARCHIVES DCS UOINE5 I THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NECGHWRS MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY HOME EDITION TTTTTTi THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS 7 MV xirxtJi rATYiK JUMaioTa OF TWO ONE ftQ 2g3 BOMB RAVAGED RUHR LASHED AGAIN Senate Defeats Subsidies in VOTE TO DENY OPA BIGHTS TO MAKE PAYMENT Upper Chamber Action Similar to That Taken Previously by House WASHINGTON sen ate voted Saturday to halt the roll back of butter meat and coffee prices through subsidies to pro cessors and deny the office price administration the right to pay any susidies on any agricultural com modity The action was taken in passin a bill extending for two years the life the Commodity Credit cor poration and increasing its bor rowing power by 51000000000 The bill now goes to the house which Friday passed a CCC ex ISSslon bill Providing a S500 000000 increase in CCC borrowing r power and containing part of the senateapproved antirollback sub sidy program I To accomplish its purpose the senate approved two amend ments to the CCC by Senator IV Aiken K and the other by Senator i Joseph C OMahoney D r Wyo Aifcen said his amendment was designed to prevent any roll back ol retail prices which would re duce prices received by farmers below either the maximum price tfcyfJM 1942 price control act Ai prod department Ajahoney said his amendment vVas designed to transfer subsidy on agricultural commodi fvom lnp office of price ad iistration to the war food iimmistrdtor Also under the OMahoney provision any subsi Qics that are necessary 40 main tain adequate production would be payable to the producer rather tnan the processor OMahoney said his provision adopted by a 19 to 13 vote would leave with OPA its au thority to ration and fix retail prices on food and carry on an effective Mar against inflation The Aiken amendment was al most identical to one approved Friday by the house of represen tatives It was adopted by the senate 46 to 29 as a substitute lor a previouslyapproved anti subsidy plan presented by Senator Bennett Clark D Mo Ailten issued the following statement in explanation of the measure It establishes a third and new price standard for maximum price ceilings on agricultural commodi the support price announced by the department of agriculture It eliminates immediately the rollback subsidy program on but ter and meats and the purchase and saleatioss program on chcd dar cheese It makes good the govern ments promise to pay subsidies on butter and meat for the period from June l 1943 until the amendment becomes law It permits the continuation of incentive payments or subsidies to producers for the current crop only on canning crops such as tomatoes corn peas and specialty crops such as peas and beans and potatoes hemp and sugar It permits continuation of the governments price support pro gram on domestic vegetable oils and fats to encourage sufficient production for the war program It permits continuation of the governments existing program on the sale of wheat for feed pur poses irjpelmils inauguration of a subsidy program to increase pro duction or any other purpose after securing approval of congress It requires orderly legislative procedure in procuring and ex pending public funds in lieu of a blank check Aiken said his amendment which had almost solid backing of major farm organizations was designed keep UK OPA from back prices M that the fanner doesnt get what has been promised htm by the secre tary X Aiken said it would necessarily stop the present program on roll ing back butter prices 5 cents pound because tiie fanners have been promised more than they an getting under that program He conceded however that the OPA could go ahead and roll back retail meat prices to an extent tha farmers would not get as much as they now receive in the open mar ket for a Hve steer because the parity price standards for cattle are lower than the existing prices roll mea far enough to put the farmer out of business but I dont think it would be advisable Aiken said Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued hot and humid Saturday afternoon and Saturday night Thunder showers and cooler Sunday forenoon Highest Saturday aft ernoon about 94 IOWA Continued hot Saturday afternoon through Sunday fore noon except somewhat cooler with scattered thundershowers in the extreme north Saturday night Highest readings Satur day afternoon in the middle and upper 90s thunder showers southeast portion early Saturday night Cooler Satur day night except continued cool near Lake Superior and ex treme northwest portion Little change in temperature Sunday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 90 Minimum Friday night 65 At 8 a m Saturday 80 At 1 p m Saturday 93 At 2 p m Saturday 94 Rain Friday morning 08 inch YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation CIOandAFL Renew Pledge of No Strike WASHINGTON Presi dents ofthe American Federation of Labor AFL and the pongress of Industrial Organizations CIO renewed the nostrikepledges of their organizations Saturday in letters to President Roosevelt crit icising congressional action in overriding the presidents veto of the GonnallySmith antistrike law 1 Williams Green of the AFL as sured the president that group will do everything in its power to make application of the law unnecessary Philip Murray wrote that he was calling the international executive board of the CIO into extraordinary session Wednes day July 7 to give mature and orderly consideration to the maliy perplexing problems which as you doubtless know labor will be confronted with as a result of the action of the congress Friday Meanwhile the labor members of the war labor board said in dividually there was no inclina tion to quit the agency as had been indicated they might do a week before the president vetoed the antistrike bill One CIO member of the board said well stick with the board and referred to Murrays state ment calling for continued sup port of the president despite the congressional action Husband Didnt Speak to Her for 3 Years TULSA Okla Hei mari Kopp testified that her 73 year old husband a carpenter had not spoken to her for three years he only communications she said were notes left on his desk granted LOCAL WORKER IS REVIVED Bacon Narrowly Escape Death by Electrocution ILof iadyal Bacon 64 employe of ttieJHutch inson Ice Cream companyof Ma son City who naxrowly escaped death Friday night by electrocu tion as he was working at th plant was reported as fair Satur day at the Park hospital Sir Bacon was operating ar electric fly sprayer when short circuit occurred in the motor of the sprayer A thumb tack in the sole of one of Bacons shoes caused a ground on the we floor on which he was working The ground completed the circuii through his body according to the physician who attended him Firemen were called at 701 oclock and found Earl Cornelius giving artificial respiration Mem bers of the salvage company took over at oclock and applied artificial respiration and the in lialator to the unconscious man After 14 minutes of application Bacon regained consciousness and to the Park hospital was taken lllti about oclock Bacon who resides at 218 Delaware avenue northeast re ceived burns on the fingers and thumb of the right hand as well shock Lost in Wheat Sent to Mexico Is Returned ENID Okla E Head wheat elevator employe lost his billfold containing in a grain bin last spring Recently the Commodity Credit ei Corporation authorized the export of some Enid wheat to Mexico in the Mediter more jittery by the newest allied trie Meaner SndToffth to have evacuated CasSso U S War Production Under in Messina Raid AntiStrike Law Main Test Monday for BacktoWork Some Coal Miners Resentful GOP Cites Blow to Administration WASHINGTON iPKCongress in a stunning reversal of Presi dent Roosevelt put American war production Saturday under the hiplash of an antistrike law so stringent union leaders pro claimed it a major disaster Re publicans saw in it a blow to the administration and resentful coal mmefs exploded in a new revolt lur wind action on the Con bill forced the longawaited issue Friday Anticlimax set in Saturday and with it came doubt and confusion on the full effects of the law bow it could be ap pliedI to the that inspired coal a certain amount of fear as to the ultimate reaction at the work benches of the arsenal of democracy Attention focused on the coa fields where 250000 miner about half the failed to return to work despite order from John L Lewis and i hi united mine workers UMW ending the recent walkout th third in seven weeks On top o that passage of the law was fol lowed immediately by fresl strikes by 20000 more miners Mr Roosevelt touched oil a momentous day when he vetoec the antistrike law as more likely labor troubles than to settle them1 ExCeptTOr the coal he insisted labor had kep nostrikeJblcdge since Pear Harbor With speed unecnialled in re cent years the senate and the louse promptly overrode his veto o make law the measure prpviri ng fines and imprisonment for persons instigating or aiding wartime strikes in government operated industries and outlaw ng stoppages in other war plant vithout a ballot of the workers The law also broadens the powers ot the war labor board WLB So rapid and unexpected was the concessional action that the justice department was un prepared to say how it would proceed to enforce the new law Nor was there any pronounce ment from the war labor board concerning its plans now that il vas given power to force the at endance of witnesses Lacking ubpena authority in the past the board steadfastly had been ig lored by President Lewis of the UMW in its handling of the coal wage controversy On one subject there was gen was the sharp st congressional rebuff handed he president since the supreme ourt reorganization bill was unked in 1937 It followed by ust a week or preliminary house ebellion whichsaw the adminis rations price rollback and sub itly program slapped down It was the eighth time a Roose veto had been overridden incc 1933 With eagerness that presaged he result the senate took up the Teto five minutes after the presi Jents message was read late in he afternoon The senators over ode it by a 56 to 25 vote 29 eurocrats joining 27 republicans o override Mr Roosevelt and 19 lemocrats five republicans and ne progressive voting to uphold he executive Among those voting o override was Acting Democratic Leader Hill of Alabama The senates action was re ported to the house while it was in the middle of a heated debate on an antisubsidy Mil cries of vote immediately went up Delaying tactics by a few mem oers were futile With a margin ot nine votes ompared with the senate edge of nly two a twothird vote being equired in each case the house verrode the veto as quickly as he roll could be called Voting gainst the president were 1H emocrats and republicans rtule f7 democrats 37 republi ans and four minor party mem upheld him As the vote was being taken IO representatives were circu atmg an open letter to congress men from President Philip Mur ay who declared that the veto ad made possible a more care ul consideration of the devastat ng implications of the measure Mssed by congress in haste1 In his veto message the presi dent said be was unalterably op posed to strikes in wartime bu expressed the view the Connally SmithHarness bill contained pro visions which in fact would fo ment slowdowns and strikes His major objection was di rected at a section legalizinc strikes in war industries not operated by the overnment provided a secret ballot of workers was taken and 30 days notice given before a strike was called He passed off as irrelevant a prohibition against political con tnbutions by unions The president said he approved sections of the measure giving him statutory power to seize wa facilities providing for mainte nance of existing terms and con ditions employment except as directed by the war labor board levying fines of and im posing one year prison sentences on persons instigating directing or financing a strike in a govern mentoperated industry and giv ing statutory standing to the war labor board While the criminal provision might make possible the arrest of few leaders who bond for their trial would give appearance a and might have some de terrent effect the president said it would not assure continuance of war production in the mosi emergencies Except in the case ol he lead ers the united mine workers sai labors no strike1 pledge has been we Authority toinduct men up lo bo years of aee into noncom bat military service the presi dent old congress Mould pro vide a direct approach neces sary to insure the continuity of war work Earlier in the day the president told his press conference tie would not recognize the UMWs Oct 31 deadline lor continued coal pro duction At the same time there were signs of disagreement within the administration over whether dis ciplinary action should be taken against the mine workers the war labor board seeking to compel the UMW to sign a contract and Sec retary of the Interior Ickcs saying lie knew of no way to make an in group sign any dividual or agreement Since the UMW policy commit tee made the back16work order to the miners contingent upon continued government operation ot the mines there was some question as to how the new law would affect the order Test in Mines Will Come Monday PITTSBURGH coal strike spread to n few more big mines Saturday despite the newly enacted antistrike law and an atmosphere of uncertainty hung over the coalfields while the real test on the backtothcmines movement was expected Monday V 9 In the ereat producing state of Pennsylvania whose mines are estimated to be operating ap proximately 25 per cent of nor mal about RtW more men left the pits Saturday Most of these were in the anth racite field Further picketing occurred to aid in closing of three mines fields of western he soft coal ennsylvania In neighboring West Virginia he secondlargest mining state irospects for normal operations Monday were much brighter with more bituminous mines re ipcning during the day Mass meetings were to be held Sunday in many mining communi ies of West Virginia and Penn ylvama at which district and lo al leaders of the united mine vorkers planned lo urge all men o go back At Unionlown Pa Michael u s secretarytreasurer ol UMW district 4 said I expect sll ofthe men to be vorking Monday Similar expressions came from union leaders but the addi tional walkouts Saturday came unexpectedly and in western Pennsylvania raised the possibility of further curtailment in steel reduction unless the men go back by Monday f Nationally there was little the ritnaUM IB the 100 Fiybg Foru GERMANS OPEN Start Fws HATE CAMPAIGN TO AID MORALE By NOLAVD NORGAAKU ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFHICA than 100 flying fortresses striking in their greatest raid of the Mediter ranean war hit the vital straits city of Messina in eastern Sicily Friday and kicked up such a huge cloud of fire and smoke that the entire target area was obscured al the end of the 18minute attack Rivaling the fortresses attack on Messina essential in the rail and ferry links with the Italian mainland the RAFs Wellingtons roared over Olbia in northern Sardinia the preceding night and started at least seven fires and a big explosion in the port area near the railway station and imong military installations and ammunition dumps Describing the American at tack on MesMna an official re port said The port area and marshalling yards were thor oughly smothered by bomb bursts when the last raider attacked there was so much smoke and dust that further ob servation of danuee was Impos sible A Renters dispatch said 200 tons of bombs were dropped in the assault Attacking without fighter pro tection the B17s met extremely violent opposition from enemy in terceptors as well as intense fight ing desperately to block the con tinuing series of devastating allied raids which already are crippling bicilys lines of communication and supply enemy fighterbomb ers swept over the highflying fortresses dropping fragmentation bombs intended to explode among the dense formations At the same timethe heaviest antiaircraft barrage yet encoun teredsouth ojrNapWs was opened up against the raiders But despite the attacks which compelled the fortresses to battle their way both to the targets and then homeward only three plants were lost in all allied operations of Friday and the preceding iiifrhf while 20 of the enemy aircraft were destroyed The axis interceptors braved ven their own flak in efforts to break into the compact formations and one bomber flight was fol lowed by the enemy to within sight of the African shore The Wellingtons however en countered scant resistance on their mission and all returned safely In other action Friday RAF beaufighters of the coastal com mand carried torpedoes and sl acked a mediumsize enemy sup ply ship escorted by three destroy ers and a Heinkel 115 float plane east of Sardinia The ship was left emitting a column of smoke Fortress crewmen were im pressed by the terrific flak as well as by the fighter opposition massed at Messina Describing the ground fire U William C Rogers 208 North Third street Mount Vernon Iowa sakt at first I thought they were celebrating the Fourth of July a week early It was pretty rough Brazilian Air Force Destroys Sub RIO DE JANEIRO Jrazilian air force plane was re lably reported Saturday to have destroyed an axis Uboal in Hie Atlantic 65 miles northeast of Rio Jc Janeiro coal fields operations esti mated roughly about onehalf based on comment by operator and union sources Slightly more than of the nations 521 090 on the basis of these esti mates were still not working The United States Steel corpor tion announced 14 of its 37 blast urnaces m the Pittsburgh area Iready are down Some time ago t stated that a weeks stoppage of oaUwould cause it to slash steel roauction 75 per cent The Steel corporation anked its No 1 blast furnace at Thomas Ala and cut operations t three others by onethird Cowans Join in Overriding Veto WASHINGTON IP Here is 4 Million Flee Area Large Air Forces Rip Sicily and Sardinia By ROGER GREENE Associated Press War Editor British sky fleets heaped new devastation on the heart ot the Ruhr industrial valley before dawn Saturday blasting the steel cities Bochum and Gelsenkir chen and the Germans beginning to wail launched an embittered hate campaign to whip up morale on the nazi home front Great fires were left rarinr m both cities the British air ministry announced although heavy clouds obscured an accu rate check of the damage Thirty R1F bombers were listed us Dispatches from Bern Switzer land said between 4000000 and 5000000 persons had already fled the bombtorn Ruhr as the allied aerial offensive striking by day and night roared through its sev enth consecutive night In the Mediterranean Hie as sault on Italys antiinvasion out posts increased in violence with the largest force of U S flying fortresses ever sent out in that ne way lowans were both houses of recorded congress res verrode the presidents veto of he SmithConnally antistrike ill Friday Wilson R for over ding Gillette D not voting m announced as for overriding House Republicans for Cun mgham Gilchrist Gwynnc loeven Jensen LeCompte Mar Observer Thinks Neutralizing of Ruhr Near End LONDON nesvy force of British bombers spread new destruction Friday night in the German Rnhr one military observer declared that neutral izing of the great industrial valley was Hearing completion This observer who cannot be identified by name estimated that nearly 30000 tons of bombs many of hem block busters had been cast upon this compact nazi industrial region since the massive bombing ex periment started three and a half months ago The normal industrial haze over the Ruhr now is reported thinned out and is said in fad to have actually disappeared in some places During the three and one half month period more than HOO bombers have been lost this source stid and some SOOO men have been killed or captured theater spilling their bombs on Messina Sicily while RAF Wel lingtons hammered the axis air base at Oibia Sardinia With their deadly fire power he fortresses destroyed 20 enemy aircraft it was announced J vOn Europes northern ram parts American heavy bombers were officially credited with de stroying nearly 100 enemy fighters in their last two en gagements over the reich against a loss of 37 U S planes Twenty were lost in Tuesdays smash at liuls in the Ruhr sile of im portant synthetic rubber wnrks inl 17 in Fridaysattack on northwest Germany American flyers described Fri days opposition by nazi lighter plnnes as territie estimating that nearly 200 FockeWulfs and Mcs ierschmitts pressed home their at tpjks with suicidal fury U S from a single base shot down 24 of the enemy As dazed and terrorstricken refugees streamed out of the Ruhr by the hundreds of thousands Nazi Propaganda Minister Goeb bels furiously assailed Americans as cultural vandals and military barbarians f Conveniently forgetting the destruction suffered by London Coventry and other cities in the 191041 batlle of Britain Goeb bels complained that allied ter ror planes were destroying in a short hour cultural posses sions which the centuries have built In a ranting broadcast chiefly aimed at the United States Goeb bcls ignored damage to German mihtary targets and declared The Americans destroy towns of the European continent with their cultural institutions of which there are no equals in Chicago or San Francisco What they cannot buy European art and culture shall become victim of their ter ror bombers Friday nights raid on the Bo chumGelsenkirchen area which produces onethird of the Ruhr coal and serves as an important rail hub was the Uth attack on i uermany m two weeks   

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