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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 24, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 24, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHIORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AMD UNITED PfUSS FULL LZASCD WIRES FIVE CBNTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY JUNE 24 1943 THIS PAPZB CONSISTS OF TWO SECTJOMS NO 221 THOUSANDS OF MINERS STAY HOME RAF Hits Axis Targets in New Shuttle Method BRITAINAFRICA ROUND TRIP IS USED BY PILOTS Bomb German Target on Way Down and Italian Port on Return Ffight LONDON new technique of air bombardment was demon strated dramatically by scvera squadrons of RAF Lancaster which early Thursday completed shuttle roundtrip from Britain t bombing a German targe on the way down and an Italia port on the run home without los of a plane The air ministry disclosed thai the aircraft which devastated three acres of the old Zeppelin works at Friedrichshafen Sun day night continued to a north African base and returned home Wednesday night by way of La Speiia blasting the naval base at the latter port This shuttle technique nev wasused before on a large sea at long range Squadron after squadron of a lied bombers arid fighters fie across the channel by daylight ripanew at Hitlers military i stallations and communications Observers on the southeast English coast said they had seen more allied planes headed for Europe Thursday than at aar tine in recent weeks There were no however S flrtar fortresses and U S Flyers Start Fires at Macassar By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS American bombers flying 2000 miles roundtrip were officially I credited Thursday with scoring a direct hit on a cruiser and getting fires visible 70 miles in an attack I on the Japanese base at Macassar Dutch Celebes Thirtyeight tons ot bombs were t dropped 1 t Striking in daylight on the longest flight yet undertaken from bases 111 Australia V S liberator pounded the enemy stronghold in great force and returned with the loss of one bomber Gen Douglas MacAr thurx headquarters announced The lone victim went dow when a Japanese fighter crasliec into its wing The two fell to j gether In the Solomons XI S daun less and avenger bombers raine 20 tons of explosives on he Japa nese seaplane base at Rekata ba Santa Isabel island and oth American flyers raided a new en emy outpost at Bur village Gannonga island On the land front Australian j jungle fighters bloodily repulsed CHINESE TROOPS ON THE winding column of Chinese troops strung a third straight Japanese attempt along a road in Yunnan province hetids for the Sahveen river front near the Burma bor der to relieve men in action against Japanese forces This scene is from a newsreel OB Li was but fave or more newly re aenal blows against Italy and her guardian islands VfelfinBton bombers of the nbrifiwest African air forces made a firesetting raid Tuesday night on thenortheast Sardinian port of Olbia a communique from Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers head quarters said Heavy RAF bomb ers of the middle east command generated two violent explosions and a number of fires in an at tack on ttie airdrome at Comiso Sicily itwas announced in Cairo In addition the Italian high command communique broadcast Rome and recorded by the Associated Press said allied planes attacked the Sicilian towns of Porto Empedocle and Catania The Catania raid was reported to have caused 119 casualties and wrecked many civilian bttildings The extraordinary nld on La Spezia which has a population of IMMt and a number of ship and submarine building yards and repair depots Was Ibe sixth since the war be Air observers said the most ob vious advantage was that Die raid ers were able to land and reservice without retracing a course along which the enemy defenses already had been alerted by the outward passage The Lancasters made a run of some 1250 miles each way going to Friedrichsbafen in southern Germany and presum ably 750 miles more to the nearest north African bases On the way back they winged about 550 miles to La Spezia and 100 home Thus each trip was somewhat shorter than the regular 1400 miles round trip to La Spe zia None of the planes was lost Formations of allied planes picked up the offensive again in daylight During the morning air craft were heard over Folkeslone winging toward northern France and Belgium Official air sources declined to speculate on whether the suc cessful rial trips across Eu rope coaM be accepted as a pat tern for the future Maj Gen James H DooliUtes attack on Tokyo was a partial ap plication of the principle in that the U 5 bombers took off from a carrier and landed in China The RAF feat aroused specula tion as to whether the U S air forces might stage similar raids The range of the flying fortresses and liberators would make such runs possible at least across France to north Italy Officially described only as which means at least several dozen Lancaster force was enough to ravage three acres of the important radio loca tion equipment plant in the icp pelin works at Friedrichshaferi and also to severely damage the Maybach Werfce motor plant on the way out On the trip the docks at La Spezia were bombed accur ately the communique said and stores of oil set afire During the night German rai made their heaviest attack in weeks asainst an English objec It was araiouhced that 15 enemy planes pounded the Port City of an attack lasting more than an hour destroying a mu seum and valuable exhibits parts of the shopping center and resi dential property PLANES COLLIDE HIGH IN AIR One of Them Crashes in Front of Train SOUTHVILLE Mass UP Two army planes collides and burst into flames at a high alti tude Thursday and one of them crashed directly in front of a sixcoach passenger train bound from Worcester to Boston de railing the engine and five of the coaches One pilot parachuted to safety and the other was believed to have perished in his burning ship None of the approximately 150 train passengers was injured railroad officials said but the engineer suffered a slight cut The Bostonbound express train passed by the station shortly before the flaming plane came plummeting down in the railroad right of way Two coaches were set afire forcing the passengers to leave the train hurriedly Firemen were summoned from nearby towns and first reports were that exploding rnachinegun bullets hampered their work No trace could be found immediate ly of the missing pilot Thousands of Italians Flock to Subterranean Passages in Catania By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Thousands chelter from allied air raids by flockingweh mgnfto subterra nean passages of the Boman am phitheater at Catania Sicily the Berlin radio said Thursday in a broadcast recorded Asso ciated Press This amphitheater 410 by 348 feet was the third largest of an cient Home being exceeded in size only by that at Verona and the Colosseum of Rome Catania founded in729 D C by Greek colonists is located on the eastern shore of Sicily at the foot of towering Mt Etna and on everal occasions in its long his ory has been virtually obliterated lyMava flows A considerable jortion of the amphitheater has een uncovered Bicycle Thief Will Receive Surprise LOS ANGELES bi cycle thief is due for a surprise Among items in the back seat of an automobile I stolen from Com edian Joe Jackson Jr were two trick bicycles which shed parts until the rider is left astride only the rear wheel GREEKS CAPTURE 500 ITALIANS iff Western Macedonia Revealed LONDON hundied Ilihan soldiers including 18 ofL cers were captured by Greek pa triots during a 52hour battle near the town of Siatista in western Macedonia a spokesman for the Greek refugee government said Thursday The Greeks were said to have inflicted many casualties on the axis force and to have captured large quantities of booty A Polish sp o ke s m a n said Wednesday night that the nazis ad intensified a terror campaign n Poland shooting the entire opulation of the villages of Ged ice and Tursk and burning most f the houses Approximately 1800 persons have been arrested in Warsaw in ecent days and 426 executed the pokcsman said At the same time he Polish underground radio sta ion set executions the past tw weeks at 528 and urged specia bombing oC German towns as re prisal t Mass arrests deportations and executions were said to be in progress in several other Poljsn cities PTTIIIAXS TO CONVENE CEDAR RAPIDS if The Grand Lodge of Knights Pythias domain of Iowa will hold its annual convention here Aug 2224 the I Mubo sector 12 miles from the I big enemy base at Salamaua New and killed or wounded 64 Japanese for a toll of 164 Meanwhile a Tokyo broadcast predicted that the allies would launch an offensive to recapture Burma in the mon soon rains have warnedthe Japanese that new al lied bombing raids on Japancould expected Mote than anything the en emy Is contemplating the recap ture of Burma which is the key to the offensive in the far east the Tokyo radio said quotine Tomokazu Hori chief of the Japanese information board Our enemies are constantly taking great pains to make plans especially to carry out raids 5n Japan proper from China and the Aleutians Hori added Apparently fishing for informa tion jhe broadcast also declared that the allied victory in north Africa had released British fleet units to join American naval pow er in the Pacific CASUALTY LIST FORUS FORCES PUT AT 87304 Army and Navy Total Lists 15132 Killed or Dead of Wounds WASHINGTON Unite States armed forces have sufferet 87304 announced casualties in war theaters to date Of thi number 15132 were killed in ac lion or died of wounds if Arnfy casualties total 63938 War Secretary Stimson said and the navys latest list also issued Thursday placed navy marine corps and coast guard losses at 23346 with 7601 dead 4732 wounded and 11010 missing The lull in recent fighting has permitted the army to complete a tabulation of its casualty re orts Stimson told his press con erence disclosing that the army as lost 7528 men who were killed in action or died of wounds 7128 wounded 22687 missing ickes Moves tor Active Mine Control WASHINGTON Secretary ekes moved Thursday to under ake active charge ot the man agement of coal mines and indi cated he expected to continue op erating them for the government tor a considerable period ot lid 16615 irisoners of iermans or officially reported the Japanese the the Italians ime Hitherto Ickes has maintained only nominal control of the mines he took over at the presidents direction May 1 but calling 29 major mine owners to meet with him here Friday he said Developments in the contro versy between the mine workers and the operators which Is un der the jurisdiction of the war labor board indicate that lite government will be compelled to continue custody and opera tion of the mines for a consid erable period of time I still hope that the contro versy will be speedily settled so that private operation of the mines may be resumed under con ditions which will not involve danger of interruption of pro duction But in the present circum stances it is essential to protect the governments interest in the operation ot the mines that I un dertake active participation iu the supervision ot management and operation of the mines In the telegrams conveying that message to the 29 mine owners including presidents several lecl companies Ickes said also hut he wished to deal with these nen as principals and that he did VHO OF ANTI STRIKE Bill IS NOW EXPECTED F R Request to Draft Strikers Results in Congress Repercussions WASHINGTON the expressed ire While our casualties have not expect them to send proxies substitutes or representatives Despite President Roosevelt and his announced in tention o seek a draft law club thousands oE miners remained away trom their wovk Thursday in defiance of their own union policy committee and Secretary Ickes indicated he expected the pits to remain under more active federal management for a con siderable period Although the backtowork movement ended the nations third wartime coal strike gained strength some United Mine Workers locals flatly voted down instructions to return to their jobs Ickes statement made in dis losing that he had called 29 mar or mine workers to meet with lim Friday followed a white louse statement Wednesday night n which Mr Roosevelt said he vovilil ask congress to raise to 65 he maximum age or induction of men into noncombatant mili aary service Steps already are under way to set up machinery for drafting into uniform all miners within present IS RECOVERED SPENCER body ot John Hoffvicliter lr 19 who drowned Tuesday night in the little Sioux river was recovered Wednesday stream two miles down Weather Report FORECAST MASON warm Thursday afternoon ami early Thursday night scattered thun dershowers Thursday night and Friday forenoon cooler Friday forenoon IOWA Scattered thundershowcrs Thursday afternoon and Thurs day night continued in south east portion Friday forenoon Somewhat cooler west and north portion Thursday night Cooler Friday forenoon MINNESOTA Cooler Thursday night continued cool Friday forenoon showers ending ex treme southeast portion early Thursday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 90 Minimum Wednesday night 66 At S a m Thursday it YEAR AGO Maximum 71 Minimum 42 COFFEE RATIONS ARE INCREASED One Pound to Be Given for 3 Week Period WASHINGTON next two coffee rations will be on the basis of one pound in three most liberal allow ance since the beginning ot ra office of price acl minisUatiori announced Thurs day v The present ration is one pound for four weeks The lowest ration lias been one pound for six weeks but Cor he most part one pound for five weeks V been heavy said the secretary it is certain that in practically all theaters of warin which our iroops have been engaged the enemys losses have been much greater than our own Be added however thefuture military operations likely t involve much greater numbers o our troops and that correspond ingly heavier casualties should be expected Thus tar Stimson said the de fensive campaign in the Philip pines remains the most costly in casualties The total including Ihe Philippine scouts but not the Philippines constabulary or the commonwealth army is il610 Most ot these are presumed to be prisoners lie said and many have been so reported officially Because of the failure to receive casualty reports during the last bitter days of fighting in both Ba taan and on Corregidor the sec retary cautioned that the Philip pine casualty figures probably in clude some listed as wounded presumably being included also among the missing and the prisoners and The government mine boss told a press conference that as a result of mine strikes in the last seven weeks it misht be necessary to set up some sort of rationinc or allocation sty stem to assure fair distribution coal selective service age limits he said in a statement preceded by the terse assertion It is a good thing that the miners are ieturn irig to their work But they werent In Pennsyl vania for instance the nations biggest coal producing state op erations were estimated by the of I Western Pennsylvania Coal Operp ators association than 50 per cent The same figure was probably many ot those listed as missing being killed ov wounded in the final days of combat The Philippine figures he said show 1273 killed 1146 wounded I 17939 missing and 10652 prison For other theaters he supplied these figures killed 15 wound ed 85 missing 60 prisoners tutal 291 CENTRAL the initial Japanese attack on Pearl hilled 412 wounded 57 missing no prisoners total 741 killed 6G4 wounded 1196 missing 594 pvis oners total 2890 LATIN killed three wounded26 missing n Ickes said such steps might have to be undertaken particularly in some sections because coal pro duction had fallen seriously be hind the rate required to attain the goal of 600000000 tons of soft coal and 65000000 tons hard coal which he said is necessary in wartime Stockpiles were down greatly Ickes said adding that it would be impossible to build them back to proper levels until production is kept flowing at a steady pace He noted that the northwest and Canada arc dependent upon Great Lakes shipping for much coal and said a steady flow of supplies is necessary movement of this coal can be completed before win ter closing the lakes otherwise the northwest might be hit first by a coal shortage In this connection Ickes said hat he had asked John 5 Lewis reported from Ohio and in Ala bama only 3000 of the states 26 000 miners were back at work Most congressional quarters re garded Mr Roosevelts draft elua proposaal as an inadequate sub stitute for the antistrike which ninny legislators now pcct him to veto bill ex OPA said large stocks ot green prisoners total 37 already on hand as well as the more regular arrival im ports with which to maintain MIDDLE EAST including th ninth air force which operate over Africa the Mediterranea these stocks made possible the I and killed 96 woundec increased ration It cautioned 214 missing 46 prisoners total 462 however that any deterioration 1 killec of the present favorable supply 9437 wounded 1620 misfing 510 situation would make smaller raprjsonere total 18738 tions necessary and that consumNORTH ers must be prepared for such AiaskaAicutians campaign an reductions whenever they are j t sea amj n lie air th necessary Coffee stamp No 21 in ration book No 1 will become valid lor one pound of coffee on July 1 and will expire on July 21 Stamp No 22 will be valid for one pound of cottce from July 22 to Some quarters interpreted Ihis to mean strikers would be put into uniform and under army discipline returned to their coal digging jobs at a privates pay of a mouth Chairman Wil liam II Davis of the war labor board WLB has estimated their present pay scale for a six day week at SJ960 or about four limes as much as army pay Immediate reaction in both house and senate was cool The Appalachian operators however resident of the united mine viewed the presidents stand fa vorkcrs to return his union mem1 vorably but asked nevertheless ers to work without setting anyllnat their mines operated by the eadline for stopping work in the government since May 1 be re bsence of some new labor turned to the owners They sai3 they had obeyed the governments Proposal Might Put Lewis in Uniform WASHINGTON J Lewis president of the united mine workers conceivably might be put into army uniform under President Roosevelts proposal to raise the draft age limit to 65 for noncombatant service as a strikebreaking de vice Lewis is 63 The effect of such an amendment on him however would depend on whether it was drawn to in clude union officers as well as workmen lent When a reporter asked whether Lewis had inmited a pistol at head of the govern ment in settine Oct 51 as such a deadline Ickes replied maybe hes pointing a pistol at my head He said Lewis had not mentioned a deadline during their talks this week before the strikers were told by Lewis to go back to work From Pittsburgh came reports however that thousands of the nations half million miners had refused to go back despite orders from the UMW The length ot time he operates the mines for the government Ickes said will depend on how long it will be before there is an agreement settling the wage dis wislies while John L Lewis presi dent of the united mine workers had been defiant in his putc between the UMW and the dcmands for 52 a day wage in operators I creases Asked whether he had any rea instructed the miners to on c 1 DIVE BOMBER TAKES A Douglas daunt less dive bomber noses over as the pilot miscalculates a landing on the deck of one of Americas newest aircraft carriers which has been converted from a light cruiser Neither the pilot nor the gunner was injured in this mis hap which occurred on the carriers shakedown ciuisc before joining the fleet For the first time since ration ing began OPA reported coffee supplies have reached a normal level with indications of suffi cient imports to sustain that volume OPA also withdrew all restric tions on the amount of green coffee which roasters may buy The action permits roasters to buy without regawl to previously es tablished allowable inventories Price Administrator Brown said the increased ration was in line with his policy of giving the public the benefit of increases in supply whenever they exist vicinity of killed l46 wounded 214 Missing no prisoners total 2324 SOUTH PACIFIC including army operations on 622 killed 1165 wounded 236 4 isi noi missing no prisoners 10131 SOUTHWEST PACIFIC includ ing the New Guinea listed as missing lure of Java by the Japancs 1242 killed 2344 wounded 1100 missing 156 prisoners total 4842 HORSE ATTACKS CAR CHICAGO saddle horse tried to prove once and for all that the automobile is not here to stay He threw hi rider and attacked R J Whitligcr car kicking in two doovs Vh windshield and the roof Whitliger unwilling to argue the point hur ricdly stepped out after the firs kick or such an agreement Ickes re pecificstatement on the point Ickes said that he would not un I think that wiih complete ood will on both sides this con roversy could be settled work until Oct 31 only as long he mines are governmentop erated The president coupled his sub He declined to make any more I gcstion Wednesday with the as sertian that the making of war munitions and supplies has gone lertake anything toward settling ahead extremely well except for he controversy that involves the coal strikes This was quickly vases because he snid the wage interpreted in congress as indi question can be dealt with only by 1 eating he intends to veto the Con the War Labor Board He did say nallySmitliHa rn ess bill The that he might try something to I measure would outlaw strikes in settle any collateral matters government controlled plants or The interior secretary termed mines regulate in pri irresponsible reckless and ridicu1 vatelyopcrated facilities and lous a report that he has taken clothe the WLB with statutory au ovcr along with control of the thority to settle all labor disputes mines control barge lines rail in defense industries roads drydocks etc Ke denied Supporters said that if a veto is that he has broadened in any way forthcoming efforts will be made hi original order seizing mine I to override it but they admitted properties and assets used ordinarj privately they have little hope of ily in connection with the opera rallying the necessary twothirds lion ot such mine and the distriI vole There seemed little doubt bution and sale of its products I however that the proposed selec   

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