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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: June 23, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 23, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME VOL XUX JCA80N JCITY GLOBEGAZETTE MAKES ALL NORTH IOWAHS NEIGHIORV ASSOOATEO PRESS AND UNRVD HttSS FOIi LEASED WUUCS HVI CXMTS A COW MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY JUNE 23 1943 HOME EDITION TTTTTTJ THIS PAFtt CONSISTS QT TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 220 P f PUSH DAY NIGHT RAIDS ON NAZIS LEWIS Operators Declare Main Issue Merely Postponed and Not Settled s t WASHINGTON back movement in Pennsyl vania and West Virginia captive mines signaled theVjend Wednesday of the nations third general war time coal strike with indications pointing to virtually fullscale production Thursday Responding to instructions from UMWPresident John L Lewis and his policy committee the men who dig coal for the big steel com panies led off the return to a return ordered only until Oct 31 and conditional upon continued government operation of the mines Those conditions led operators to protest that the main contract em bracing portaltoportal pay was merely postponed not set tled Except for the captive mines few pits returned immediately to production as local unions awaited receipt of the formal order to go back to work Partial crews showed up at some shafts but op erations were far from normal Despite some expressions from union leaders of dissatisfaction with the settlement an early check t indicated no move to disregard the policy committees order Bewmed production for the steel on a re duced the immed iate threatto war production and ledjsteel company officials to can cei plans for further curtailment of operations In addition to specifying that the government must not restore direction of the mines to their onners the unions back to worfe order carried a broad indication vtbat the miners weald resort to Ifce courts to obtain the under ground travel pay denied them by the WLB The terms set forth by Lewis and the policy committee for a resumption of work were criti cized during the day by the Appa lachian soft coal operators who told the WLB that operation of the mines on those terms would the operators for compli ance with the governments policy and reward Lewis for defiance By no stretch of the imagina tion said the operators in a let ter to Chairman William H Davis can this dispute be considered settled if the mines operate on any such basis as that indicated by the order of the policy com mittee of the united mine workers America We call upon you they said lo insist upon an orderly two party agreement which will insure normal operation of the mines and their restoration totheir proper ownership and control The letter was delivered to Davis personally by R L Ireland Jr and Edward R men for the northern and south ern AaWalachian respec tively central Pennsylvania operators were not included in the northern group which sub scribed to the letter A statement issued in behalf of the Appalachian operators de clared the action of the UMW policy committee is in direct vio lation of the war labor boards WLB directiveof June 18 If the president said the op erators referring to Mr Roose velt permits the mines to be op erated under the terms laid down by John L Lewis the main issue goes unresolved Nothing is set tled The present strike is merely postponed The main question now is can Mr Lewis continue lo defy the sole agency designated by the United States government to make final determinations in la bor disputes The immediate reaction of WLB Chairman William H Davis to the miners decision was expressed in these words I take Mr Lewis statement to mean that he production of coal will be resumed under the conditions ordered by the war labor board and I think thats all the country is interested in It appears that the new deadline is at of Coal Expected Thursday SHERIFFS JURY MAKES AWARD TOM Appraisal Follows Condemnation by City for Airport Drainage A cash award of addi tion lo a small bridge was given Charles Pine by a sheriffs jury which Tuesday afternoon ap praised the land which the city of Mason City has condemned in order to construct a drainage ditch from the municipal airport to the creek south ot highway 18 The appraisal listed the follow ing cash items Land value approximately 3 acres j 500 Loss of income 40 years 800 Damage to 20 acres east of ditch 400 Damage to resale value of farm 400 FLYING NURSE CITED FOR BRAVERY Second Lt Dorothy P Shikoski 23 of Green Lake Wis first woman in the south Pacific theater of war to win the ait medal is awarded the decoration by Lt Gen Millard F Harmon Miss Shikoski a flying nurse risked her life in attempting to save a marine navigator in a plane crash AP photo from U S army Halloween when p u m p k i n s frighten children Whether claim was duunl by Majority the wax MKcrtaiaC Techni cally Lewis was stall in defiance of the board He refused to sign the contract as directed calling itan infamous yellow dog contract even though it appeared he was accepting the wage terms of that contract Whetfier this means the min ers contrary to traditional policy agreed to work without a contract is a matter of interpretation It was possible the WLB might yet protest to the president against LeAvis condition that the govern ment must retain direction of the mines A wellplaced source said na tionalization of the mines as such was not contemplated and the operators would be continued as managers for the government although s t r i ct e r supervision would be required Interior Secretary Ickes cus todian of the minds for the gov ernment would say only this The mine workers understand that my job is solely to produce the coal necessary for war pur poses and to heat Americas homes this winter To do this will re quire the utmost cooperation of the mine workers and of the en tire coal industry I feel sure that this cooperation will be given A further indication that the fijht was far from ended was seen in the commentaf Repre sentative Wadsworth KN Y cvanther of the selective serv ice law This Is just another postponement of settlement of the fundamental issue Is the government as representative of the whole people in time of war superior to John trtewis The issue had better be settled and tbe sooner the better I have no doubt it is Lewis ob jective to put control of the mines in the hands of the government just as long as he can compel it to stay there out of the hands of the owners It is an enormously important precedent and if maintained the same tactics maybe pursued with out end in any number of indus tries and the owners will be help less Its another way of socializing important industries without leg islation Reports from the field indicated the miners would start returning to the pits for the late shifts Wednesday but full production may not be restored for a day or two because many local unions wait for official notice from UMW headquarters That was going out Wednesday Lewis and several lieutenants conferred with Ickes and his staff on Monday and Tuesday then called his policycommittee into session Tuesday night Less than an hoar after the meeting began reporters were summoned the MseMent hall of the mittee members stayed in their seats while the newsmen crowd ed around the chairmans plat form whereJLewfe stood in shirtsleeves Expect lowcms to Be on Job Thursday DES MOINES 0 George Heaps an executive of the Iowa Coal Operators association said the 2000 union coal miners in the state did not return to work Wed nesday apparently because they did not receive notice to return in time Heaps said he expected all would be back at work Thursday INSTIGATORS OF RIOTS SOUGHT Many Sentenced for Taking Part in Disorder DETROIT for find ing and punishing the instigators of the savage race riots of Monday and Monday night that brought death to 29 persons and injuries to hundreds others were being made Wednesday by state and local authorities Meanwhile army troops numbering more than 3500 maintained a modified form of military control as they patroled Detroits Negro sections still showing the effects of conflict Gov Harry F Kelly and Mayor Edward J Jeffries announced they were giving serious consider ation to asking for a special grand jury Promising punishment com mensurate with their crimes th governor said The real inciters andassaulters are the ones we are after They will be found by sorting out the more than 1000 prisoners we have and by seeking them out in their hiding places if they are not among the prisoners The governor said he had called State Attorney Gen Herbert J Rushton from Lansing to aid ir preparing for prosecutions Governor Kelly also disclosed that John S Bugas chief of the federal bureau oK investigation here is interviewing prisoners and aiding in the sorting out of the minor offenders from those against whom more s e r i o charges wil be brought Recorders Judge J o h n S Scanllen who Tuesday sentenced more than three score Negroes to 90 days in the house of correction for participation in the riots metecT outsimilar sentences to a group of white youths Wednesday Five white boys ranging in age frohl 17 to 18 were in the first group t This court makes no distinction of color the judge told them as he pronounced sentence War and fnm JMT GtoteGueUe carrier Total cash The jury added the following statement This award is on the condition that the city of Mason City install and maintain a proper crossing bridge of sufficient size and strength to warrant the safe crossing ot ordinary farm equip ment The bridge would be construct ed across the ditch parallel to highway 18 so that Mr Pine would have access to the west 20 acres ot his40acre farm without taking his farmequipment or stock on tc the Mr Pine had asked for the 3 acres and damages to the remainder of his farm which the drainage ditch bisects An open ditch with a maximum width of 30 feet and depth of 10 feet at the upper end will be con structed by the civil aeronautics commission in connection with the building of paved runways on the airport City Manager Herbert T Bar clay pointed out that the north south runway slopes toward tlwi south and that the paved portion will be 150 feet wide and 5600 feet long In the event of a heavy downpour the ditch will be needed just to carry the surface water oft the runways The ditch will start at the south end of the north south runway but lateral tiling will bring water to it from the northeastsouthwest runway also The appraisers were William Dickerson ijlear Lake real estate dealer Eli Mck farmer north of Clear Lake John Jindrich Swale dale businessman Howard OLeary Mason City manager of city and farm property Walter At kinson farmer south of Clear Lake and R P Hanson Mason City building contractor The appraisal of the Walter Tesene property for extension of the northsouth runway is to be made Tuesday June 29 by a sheriffs AIR RAID WARDEN FINED PASADENA Cal Warden Philip Steinberg was fined S250 for not doing he imposed on everyone else the necessity of doing He left an il luminated sign ablaze in his furni ture store window in violation of dimout regulations Weather Report FORECAST MASON warm Wednesday afternoon through Thursday forenoon Scattered thundershowers Wednesday aft ernoon or evening IOWA Widely scattered thunder showers Wednesday afternoon and night and in east and south portions Thurs day forenoon Continued warm cast and south portion Wednes day night becoming cooler in north portion Thursday fore noon MINNESOTA Cooler Wednesday night and south portion Thurs day forenoon Widely scattered thundcrshowers east portion Wednesday afternoon and early Wednesday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 86 Minimum Tuesday night At 8 a m Wednesday 75 YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 44 I HOLLAND Quentin FRANCE Sed Blockbusters Are Dropped on Salerno ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA n with heavy bomb loads less han 12 hours after American bombers had jolted the same tar rets by daylight Wellingtons of RAF smashed at Salerno YANKS ATTACK RUHR the heels of a 700 four engined1 bomber RAF attack on Krefeld broken arrow the U S air force made its first venture into Germanys vital industrial Ruhr valley with a daylight raid on the Huls synthetic rubber plant at Recklinghausen 13 miles north of Essen A formation of fortresses also attacked the former General Motors plant at Antwerp Rickenbacker in Moscow as Representative of Stirason Flyer Is Continuing Tour of Battlefronis to See High Officials MOSCOW Capt Eddie Rickenbacker has been in Moscow since Sunday on a mission as the representative of Secretary o War Henry L Stimson it was dis closed Wednesday Rickenbacker arrivcdat 1 p m Sunday in a fourengined liber ator The news of Rickenbackers presence in Moscow was made public to those present Tuesday at a Kremlin ceremony where United States Ambassador Wil liam H Standley presented 60 American military awards to Rus sian soldiers nnd sailors His visit to Russia is a continu ation of his tour of world battle fronts It was assumed that he will see various higlt ranking mili tary people and officials possibly Premier Josef Stalin himself The flyer was accompanied by his personal physician Dr Alex ander Dahl and two representa tives of the war department Col William Nickels and Maj A B Serry The party was greeted at the airport by Ambassador Standley Brig Gen Joseph A Michcla American military attache and others of the embassy staff as well as high ranking Russian of ficers CAPT EDDIE KtCKENBACKER Townsend Declares U S to Take Steps for Normal Com Trading COLUMBUS Ohio tPi Three farm belt governors Wednesday had the assurance ot Clifford Townsend deputy food adminis trator that the government soon take action to get corn moving into normal trade chan nels again Corn has been withheld in in creasing amounts by growers since imposition of a a bushel price ceiling While there was no indication what the action might be Town send said four moves were pos sible They were complete re moval of the ceiling importation ot grain from Canada or confisca tion of grain nowMn bins Townsend conferred with Govs Forrest C Donnell of Missouri Andrew F Schocppel of Kansas and Robert S Kerr of Oklahoma all here for the governors con ference We must have action now Oohnell said Donne 1 gave Townsend a state ment from John W Ellis Missouri commissioner of agriculture in which he recommended the ceil ing on Iowa corn be increased to or S125 a bushel He said Missouri farmers were paying us high as 5135 for black market corn from Iowa now Reds Hour of Decisive Event Near LONDON Moscow radio in a broadcast addressed to the red army said Wednesday that the hour of a decisive eventis approaching Duke of Windsor 49 Congratulations Are Received by Wry Smile NEW YORK Duke of Windsor and governor of the Bahamas was 49 years old Wednesday and greeted con gratulations with a wry smile x It is a little too close to 50 for com tort the former British monarch commented when he ap peared alone at a press interview terminating a sixweek visit lo New York The duke explained that hi duchess Americanborn Wallis Warfield was unable to be prescnl because she was in quite a rush preparing for their departure later Wednesday Fort Dodge Power Is Shut Off by Sparrows FORT DODGE spar rows that came in contact with a switch at the electric plant of the IowaIllinois Gas and Electric company Wednesday morning caused a short circuit that resultet in a citywide power breakdown Service was cut off five minutes Bodies of the culprits were founc under the switch he Monday night in a continuation of allied efforts to knock out the underpinnings of Mussolinis sup ty system for southern Italy and icily Two ion blockbusters were planted squarely in the freight yards and near barracks at Salerno 30 miles southeast of Naples and huge fires broke out allied headquarters said Salerno is a key point on the main electric railway running southward from Naples to he Italian toe The American raid already had caused extensive damage to the many railway sidings repair depots and ap proaches to the yards there and reconnaissance reports showed railway traffic already had been nterrupted for 24 hours by the smashing of roundhouses tuni lahles and other installations at other points along the line The Wellingtons encountered only light antiaircraft fire as hey swept in over their targets and no enemy fighters so that all the raiders returned safely to their bases The only other aerial activity of the northwest African air forces Tuesday was patrolling and reconnaissance the bulk of the hundreds of bombers and fighters being inactive But a mediumsized enemy vessel which was caught tow iiic half a dozen barges no miles off the southeast coast of Sardinia the previous night was sunk by RAF beaufighters which swept through a barrage by an escorting destroyer and tut The allied airmen also attacked the barges and destroyer but the results were not observed One allied plane was lost in al Tuesdays operations which in cluded forays by Malta intruders over Sicily and southern Italy Tuesday night when railway sta tions and a factory were attacked with bombs and machineguns A supplement to a Malta com munique said Maltabased ply wood mosquito bombers also ha rassed Sicilian airfields and rail ways Tuesday night especially at Sibari Licata and Thebisacce Aerial reconnaissance photos taken after the U S flying fort ress raid Monday on Naples dis closed that 40 per cent of the Italian royal arsenal there hrt been destroyed by flames and ex plosions MUELHEIM HIT BYBIGFORCEOF BRITISH PLANES Flying Fortresses Return From Daylight Attacks on Europe LONDON of American Hying foxtresses roared n low across Dover and Folke stone Wednesday evening dis Jatches from those coastal points said apparently returning from new daylight attacks on Europe following a heavy assault Tuesday light by HAP fourengined bomb ors on the German steel and com munications centeu of Muelheim Townspeople in Dover and Folkestone crowded into the streets as the reluming for tresses swept over at less than 2000 feet They waved to the big bombers and cheered It was reported authoritatively that aerial photographs taken during Tuesdays fortress attack in Huls Germany showed that the highlycombustible synthetic rubber plant there was set atire and the entire target plastered GROUNDED NAZI AIRPLANES HIT Reds Raid Airdrome in Leningrad Area MOSCOW army planes methodically smashing German air power on the western front destroyed 20 grounded naz planes in n raid on an airdrome in the Leningrad area Wecinesday The attack was part of a sys tematic assault by soviet bomb eis up and down lie long battlt line as ground action dwindled lo artillery duelling and reconnais sance thrusts Tuesday night the nazis lost r aircraft in what soviet announce ments described as random bomb ing attacks near Leningrad Nine other German planes wen shot down in air combats west o Rostov the soviet midday com munique said German news agency dispatch es Tuesday night described strong luftwaffe attacks on the soviet rear and said 42 soviet planes were destroyed during as saults on communications arm plants and The communique paid sovic snipers working their way int nazi lines in the Leningrad area killed 192 enemy officers and mer in 10 days of reconnaissance work A similar exploit was reportec from the Sevsk area in the Kursk salient where several dozen Germans were captnred Communiques covering the las 24 hours said Russian guns were active in the Sevsk Rostov am Leningrad regions and near Mtsensfc northeast of Orel where artillery fire vyrecked several en emy fortifications Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from sour GlabeGazette carrier Try to Knock Out Specific Area by Aerial Attacks By UNITED PRESS An allied field experiment to determine whether a niven war area can be knocked out by aerial bombardment moved forward Wednesday under the impetus of a powerful new blow at Germanys battered and smoldering Ruhr valley A British and American of fensive which had delivered some 3700 tons of bombs to the Ruhr in about 24 boon was turned on the steel at Mulbeim east of Duisburgr and left it a ulazius mass visible 100 miles How much bombing of such scope and intensity he Ruhr could take was a matter the RAF and eighth United States air force were beut on finding out The effort shaped up as a cross section of the avowed determination of the allies to find out whether Germany can be bombed into submission The axis still harped on prop aganda feelers for information on allied invasion plans Berlin reporting that stronr parachute units were amonc American ana British forces massinc across the Mediterranean from southern Europe Eis concentrations of war ships were observed in the Mediterranean the nazis said The massed naval forces were described as especially heavy in the areas of Gibraltar and Alexandria The German radio artists however had their hands full in dealing with the Anglo American air offensive ajainst the reich More and more the Berlin broadcasts were conced ing the efficacy nf the raids referring as they did to major casualties widespread des truction and tribulations ofthe stricken areas with explosive and incendiary bombs Wednesdays formations returned from across the channel while squadroms of twoengined Wellington bombers of the RAT still were pounding targets in en emy territory Scores of high Hying allied fighters also were across the channel continuing the pattern of roundtheclock assault The RAF night attack again took the British to the Ruhr An air ministry communique said preliminary reports indi cated the bombinr was well concentrated and declared re turning crews reported they had seen ffreat fires still burning in Krefeld main objective a smashing RAF assault on the Rhineland the previous night and al Huls which was hit by U S flying fortresses in day light Tuesday RAF fighter planes simultan eously carried out intruder patrols over Holland and France shoot ing down two enemy aircraft in the course of the operations the bulletin said It reported 35 British bombers and one fighter had failed tore turn Fortyfour bombers were lost m the Monday night raid on Krefeld Muelheim was described as satellite of the great industrial center of which is sit uated at the junction of the Rhine and the Ruhr It is an important center of the Germah steel industry as well as   

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