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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, June 22, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 22, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX PRESS WmES MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY JUNE 22 1943 THIS PAPERCONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE tec in t Wx the tior rep bee BIG PLANE FLEETS HIT NAZI PLANTS Offensive Opened Against Italian Mainland Dispa Crane wedder Mercer Greece Contest ClarK I T RACE law was de jClaipedtinDetroit after race riots spread through ftHe city A Negro 5s pictured left as he was cornered by police during the fighting A mob ot white persona is pictured top right as thev waited for Negroes to alight from street cars or appear on the streets Smashed and burned automobiles litter a street in the Negro district lower right Enforce Detroit Calm lmited 3Stay Away From War PlanM After Riots DETROIT sleel helnieted federal troops backing their commands with rifles and machine guns enforced cairn Tuesday in riottorn sections of warbusy Detroit where 23 per of them killed and 700 injured in racial fighting Monday The soldiers marching on pa trol past shattered stores and residences or rolling through empty streets in jeeps and ar mored cars operated under the authority of a presidential proc lamation and under orders from their officers to Six your bay enets load your guns and dont take anything from anybody Negro antagonists who engagti in battling thateven swirled at Detroits venerable city hall on downtown Woodward avenue skulked into aiding Under an order by Gov Harry Kelly of Michigan barring assem bly of persons in Wayne Oakland and Macomb counties an American league baseball game between the Detroit and Cleve land teams scheduled tor 5 p m central war time Tuesday night was postponed Officials of the Detroit race track called off the racing program Clarence Lchr director of the Detroit racing as sociation announced that race en tries were being accepted for Wednesday however Theaters were permitted to open Tuesday but weretold they must close at p m as cur few restrictions remain in effect Governor Kelly Mayor Edward J Jeffries Jr and arroy officials who participated in a conference sard they had not decided on any date for the army troops to dis continue their guard duty Thousands of employes hi war plants here remained from work Tuesday but spokesmen for the principal companies Involved said it was impossible to say what ex tent production ivas affected A General Motors corporation spokesman reporting less than 40 per cent of the Negroes on the morning shift were at work said the effect on production was les sened by a policy several years old of sprinkling Negro workers through all departments Ford Chrysler and Briggs Man ufacturing company officials re ported absenteeism up to about 35 per cent of total working forces but said all departments were op erating some on curtailed sched ules Whal provoked the spread Minaret violence that jtot out ot control of Detroit frce 35N polke remained undetermined on the Belle Isle bridgeSunday night underlying racial unrest has been recognized to exist here for three years John S Bugas head of7the De troit office of the federal bureau of investigation said we have no exidence that the riot was in any way planned or organized and added there was no indica tion that axis propaganda or any foreign power had anything to do with the riot White and Negro civic leaders in formal statements following a conference with Mayor Edward J Jeffries Jr blamed the rioting on an organized national fifthcol umn conspiracy to break our na tional unity and disrupt the home production front Approximately 1300 persons were arrested during the wide spread violence as whites and Negroes alike were attacked automobiles overturned street car windows broken and stores looted Police estimated 85 per cent of those held were Negroes Many were detained in state troops armories because police lacked the facilities for handling them Many youngsters of teen age who were guilty of no greater offense than violating the 10 p m curfew im posed by the governor were re leased and sent home Disposition of the rioters to open violence faded rapidly late Mon day night as the soldiers moved in Tvestfar The spark that WT ww u jutoitj JM fitkt SUMMER ENTERS IOWA OFFICIALLY Waterloo Reports 99 for Highest in State DES MOJNES officially rolled into Iowa at a m Tuesday after Mbndays last day of spring saw the mer cury rise to within an eyelash of the 100degree mark Mondays state top was 99 at Waterloo hottest of the year for lowa Monday nights low was 62 at Onawa The temperatures were move on the pleasant side Tuesday with the 9 a m reading 70 here Scattered thundershowers were on tap Tuesday and cooler weather was forecast for the northeast and north central por tions Iowa Falls reported one inch of rain Other precipitation re ports Ames 95 inch Cherokee 56 Dubuque 52 Waterloo and Mason City 44 and Decorah 42 MINNEAPOLIS Jane Devine 21 reported to police USat a man broke into her hoineahd seized her throat while she was sleeping early Tuesday The in truder led through the window when she screamed she siid V OIL CONTRACT Kribx Cancels Agreement But Wont BePressured WASHINGTON UP Assistant Attorney General Normal Littell told the house public lands com mittee Tuesday that the contract between the Standard Oil com pany of California and the navy department for joint operation of the Elk Hills Cal petroleum re serve went beyond agreements involved in the Teapot Dome and Elk Hills oil scandal of the Hard ing administration Declaring the present Elk Hills contract now being investigated resulted in a form of partner ship between the government and Standard Littel said that terms of the contract conveyed to the company land owned by the government This contract he asserted goes beyond the Fall Albert Fall secretary interior during the Teapot Dome leases contracts Terming the transaction a pool ing of resources Ijttell said it had the effect of giving the Standard OH company a monopoly on oil production from the reserve for the first five years Those agreements called lor the exchange ot government owned oil for equipment owned by private companies while in the present case the contract provided only for oil production in return for a share of government oil Meanwhile Navy Secretary Knox in letters to senate and house naval committees said that al though he has ordered abrogation of the contract the navy will not under any circumstances sur render willingly to the pressure or intrigue of anyone public or pri vate who seeks to exploit and dissipatethe Elk Hills field He did not amplify his reference to pressure and intrigue P R Move Within 48 Hours in Coal arike Is Exigedgd Bar War Savings Bonds and Stamps from yonr GlobeGaxette carrier bay Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Somewhat cooler through Wednesday forenoon Scattered thundershowers Tues day afternoon iOWA Weather continued warm Tuesday night and Wednesday lorenoon Scattered thunder showers Tuesday afternoon arid evening MINNESOTA Showers and scattered thunderstorms Tues day night and Wednesday fore noon warmer north portion little change in temperature Wednesday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 95 Minimum Monday night 65 At 8 a m Tuesday 71 ERAaR AGO nCh Maximum so Already Started to Choke Steel Industry WASHINGTON I r e c t action by the white house was viewed Tuesday as possible within 48 hours unless the nations 521 000 striking coal miners unex pectedly return to work before then Their latest walkout third in seven weeks has already begun to choke the warvital steel in dustry coke production was cut in Alabama and Pennsylvania some blast furnaces were beinir prepared to shut down and of ficials pictured he industry as close to the bottom of the bin in coal supplies Without presidential interven tion the only hopeful sign in the troubled coal situation was a series of conferences between Interior Secretary Ickes government operator of the mines and John L Lewis president of the United Mine Workers They met Mondas kept silent about what was discussed and gave out only that the talks were continuing Tuesday Lewis and the UMW policy com mittee refused to interfere with the walkout which followed a twoweeks truce between the miners and the operators The war labor board which re jected the unions demands for underground travcl pay and or dered the 1941 contract continued for two years was represented as being just as firm in its stand Unquotable sources said the WLB served notice on Ickes that any understanding he reaches with mnst conform the boards directive Besides the old contract terms the board granted the miners an increase in vacation pay and al lowances for equipment which would raise their daily pay about 25 cents Underground travel pay the board insisted contained a hidden increase that would not be allowable under the holdthe line government policy and was a matter for the courts to decide Chairman William IT Davis said the miners on a sixday week could average S4960 Lewis said it was a yellow dog contract and would have nothing to do with it If usual procedure is followed the WLB would certify the mine walkout to the president as a case of noncompliance asking him to enforce its orders This is done usually after the lapse ol a few days Meanwhile Secretary Ickes is sued an order freezing the esti mated 3000000 tons of railroad borne soft coal in transit so it could be diverted where needed most None of it may go to con sumers having more than 10 days supply and those with less may apply to their railroad freight agentfor aid in obtaining emer gency fuc i LAST OF DUTCH JEWS DEPORTED Reported Taken to Poland by Germans LONDON Nether lands news agency said Tuesday that the last Jews in Amsterdam had been deported to Poland by the Germans which it said com pleted the removal Hollands entire Jewish population The news agency said that Die Netherlands had approximate 180000 persons classified as Jews by nazi standards at the time of tile 19HJ German invasion Their deportation was carried out in three stages on a geograph ical basis April 11 was set lor the beginning of the removal of Jews from eight of Hollands II prov inces Jews in the remaining three provinces were ordered removed beginning April 23 except for the city of Amsterdam In Amsterdam where a large concentration of Jews was helc behind ghetto harriers the final stage began with a deportation de cree issued on May 14 Agreement Is Reached by French ALGIERS the greatest crisis in its short his tory the French committee of na tional liberation agreed Tuesday for Generals Henri Giraud and Charles De Gaulle to remain in command of their respective armed forces while appointing a subcommittee which ultimately might uiufy all French forces A subcommittee ot eight mem bers including De Gaulle and Giraud is to be charged with the responsibility of eventually merg ing the two forces it was said The plan answered the stipula tion disclosed to have been made by the United States and Great Britain that General Giraud re main as the supreme authority over the French military estab lishment in North Africa a vital base for allied operations The committee which took near ly three hours to reach its decision Tuesday afternoon now is expect ed to divert its attention to less controversial issues It is to meet again Friday DC Gaulle and Giraud were re ported to have shaken hands heartily after the committees agreement MORMON LEADER DIES SALT LAKE CITY Latter Day Saints Mormon church Tuesday mourned the passing of one of its leaders 86 year old Rudger Clawson presi dent o the Council o the Twelve Apostles INVASION PLANS MOVING ALONG KNOX DECLARES U S Supply Line to Russia Across Pacific Functioning Steadily WASHINGTON ff Navy Secretary Knox said Tuesday that preparations are moving right along lor an allied invasion of Europe Knox was asked at a press con ference for comment on a new Russian insistence that an allied army be thrown onto the German dominated continent The Rus sians said that while the German army has been defeated several limes during the past year ami while the military situation is now generally favorable to the al lies there can be no victory with out a second front Knox said he would make no comment at all on the sub ject of a second front a term that he has repeatedly avoided using However he said that preparations for an attack on Europe are ROMIR forward rifchl along Obviously we cant talk in specific terms the navy secre tary added but there has been no cessation oC these activities Knox holds and frequently has expressed the idea that here are manyfrontsin the war today anc thatit is erroneous tocall a pros pective front in Europe a sec ond front In response to other questions Knox said he knew of no Japa nese interference xwith the move ment of supplies from the Unitet States to Russia across the Pa cific The line to Russia still is func tioning he declared although whether the Japanese are hold ing up any of the ships and ex amining them I dont know Asked specifically whether any of the ships had been taken by the Japanese as prizes of war Knox said not to his knowledge Nor did he know nf any which had recently been sunk He recalled that a long lime ago one or two the vessels were lost the Japanese at that time declaring they had been sunk by the United States to create an incident Has anything developed on tha route to Russia which would pro vide an international incident Knox was asked Nothing he replied emphati cally Both skies are keeping very carefully away from anything hat would precipitate an incident The Russians irc busy with lie Germans on the west and lapar does not want to take 011 Rus sia Another questioner asked wheth er the Japanese base ot Kiska is land in the North Pacific now tuts been effectively blockaded Knox replied thjfihe Japa nese probably couyi get in with submarines any time but agreed that a garrison the size of that at Kiska could hardly be maintained permanently by sub marineborne supplies alone He added that the rarrison would feel the pinch particu larly in ammunition Knox said the nations aircraf carrier construction program i coming along very satisfactorily adding that by the end of this year the nation will have in car riers of all types several times th number of such vessels in the navy at the end of 1941 At tha time there were seven carriers in service The secretary also dcciarec there are plenty of planes to sup ply the floating airfields and tha the number of planes is nicely balanced with the number o combat pilots being turned out b the pilot training program Knox was asked whether he would comment on axis report that there were American flee units in the Mediterranean He said that he knew of no sucl movement and remarked that thi Mediterranean is the responsi bility of the British fleet 2 IOWANS MISSING WASHINGTON TWO were announced by the navy a missing They arc Chester Eugem Rudd Bonaparte anti Louis Elme Trcmmcl Ashlon Report 25 vjreat Fires Left in Italy ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN AFRICA ive gicat fires one covering an irea a mile in diameter were left dazing in the port of Naples and n the nearby air stores depot of by allied bombers Mon lay which began their attack be ore dawn and continued it into he afternoon In a similar timed assault British and American heavy bombers from the middle east command raided the Italian toe cities of Heggio Calabria and San Jriovanni before dawn and again by daylight demolished a harbor mole and scattering destruction in he wake of allied headquarter varnings that the air war is to e extended widely to Musso inis factories and inland cities as well as to his ports Maj Gen James H Dooliltles twinengined Mitchells also car out the tirst medium bomber missions against the Italian main land and with their P38 light ling escorts blasted the railroad yards and other objectives at Salarno and scored 25 direct hits on railroad sidings at Battipaglia Both Salerno and Battipaglia are south of Naples British Wellington bombers the blockbuster carriers began the onslaught against Naples Italys greatest port Sunday night with their cargos or high explosives and incendiaries which started it number of fires Then an armada of 100 flying fortresses7 picked up the task b daylight and smashed through thu aftemoorj at the same smoking targets Weaving through 30 to 40 ene my planes Iwo lights ot the hugewingecTB17s rained bombs throughout the Naples industria area hitting roundhouses loco motive repair shops and roya arsenal and torpedo factory stores and oil dumps In a companion assault at Can cello approximately 50 per cen of the railroad trackage was left useless and several buildings were smashed by direct hits Operating like an aerial scis sors the middle east commands American liberators came in from the south Monday for the attacks on Reecio Calabria and San Giovanni dropping nearly 275000 pounds of high explo sives and incendiaries a com munique from Cairo announced The liberators swept in on the heels of heavy RAF bombers from the middle east who bombed the same targets Bad visibility prevented obser vation of the RAF attack but the communique said the mole wes the ferry terminal at Ean Gio vanni was demolished a ferry ii a slip was turned over Jrom a direct hit and heavy columns o smoke sent spouting from the bombed area At Rcggio Calabrai numerous bomb bursts were seen in the railroad yards and along the wat erfront Heavy damage was done to the mole said the communique Our formations met unusu ally heavy fighter opposition and underwent aerial bombard ment said the Cairo announce ment which reported 20 enemy aircraft were shot down and probably eight others destroyed in fierce battles None of the American planes was lost Three more fighters wer brought down by the northwes African forces for an allied tola of at least 23 enemy planes Mon day compared with the loss o two allied planes The northwes African forces total ot axis air craft destroyed in the last lou days thus mounted to 57 The royal arsenal and torpctii factory at Naples were left burn ing by the attack and aerial pho tographs showed a belt of flam a mile wide from a hit on an oi dump TreeClimbing Horse Back to Earth Again BILLINGS Mont Bjorgurns treeclimbing horse i back to earth again It took th fire department a block am tackle and three hours work ti do it Bjorgum said the anima was frightened tried to jum through a high fork in a cotton wood tree and got stuck Non aboard M RAF CRAFT LASH KREFELD IN MIGHTY MUD 44 Bombers Missing American Daylight Raiders Pound Ruhr By ROGER GREENE Associated Press War Editor American daylight raiders smashed at Germanys vital foundries m the Ruhr for the irsl time in the war Tuesday and loundcd targets in Nazioccupied Belgium within a few hours iftcr RAF blockbuster planes delivered a shattering assault on he Rhinoland city Krefeld More than 700 RAF bomb ers raided Krefeld Striking in two waves U S lying fortresses bombed the Hills synthetic rubber works at Heck inghauscn in the Ruhr and jlasted the former General Mo tors plant at Antwerp Belgium Twenty fortresses were lost but he raiders shot consid erable number of enemy fighter planes Tuesday alternoon other strong forces of allied planes sped across the English chan nel toward northern France and a large column o black smoke was seen rising near Boulogne Coincidentally fresh axis in vasion alarms rang across Europe and in Washington Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox told a press conference that prepara tions for an allied grand assault on Europe were moving right along London quarters said a big force of U S bombers attacked the Ruhr production center of threefourths oE Germanys coal and twothirds of her iron and steel American RAF and allied fighter squadrons supported the attack In the Mediterranean the menclous fleets of American and allied planes opened a fullscale of tensive against the Italian mainland showering many hun dreds ot tons of high explosives over a wide expanse from Naples to the southernmost tip of the peninsula A Rome broadcast admitted considerable damage as the al lied preinvasion barrage shitted from Italys inland outposts to the mainland Meanwhile axis invasion fears were reflected anew in a Berlin broadcast reporting that allied troops landing craft and a ma jor British parachute force ivere massing for the assault on southern Europe Underground patriot forces in France received an allied signal to be ready to act any moment broadcast made in the name of the interallied high London heard that German troop strength 5n France hal been raised from 35 to 44 divisions a total of about 650000 soldiers Other reports said the Germans were feverishly strengthening antiinvasion defenses from the French Mediterranean coast to the Balkans Tuesday incidentally was der tag named several weeks ago by the German for an allied invasion of Europe During the night German raid ers droppcy bombs at scattered points in the greater London area and touched off two alarms in the capital but little damage was re ported Fortyfour RAF bombers were listed as missing in the attack en Krtfeld pop sec ond raid itf a row thai it was one of the heaviest Mows of the war f if if By comparison the RAFs big gest losses in the past included May 30 lost over Col ogne in the first 1000 bomber raid in history June 25 lost over Bremen Two weeks ago 43 bombers ot the greatest attacking force yet sent over Germany all gined planes failed to return from raids on DuesscldorC and Mucn sler DNB the German news agency admitted that numerous   

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