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Mason City Globe Gazette: Saturday, June 19, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 19, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME H 4 i THt NEWSPAPER THAT MAKCS ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBOU MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY JUNE 19 1943 HOME EDITION irnnn vii1 HJYYA PATUKUAX JUNK 19 1943 MM cguwn or 217 STRIKES MOUNT AFTER WLB RULING Evolution of Battle Cry Pageant Is Spot of Convention TURN TO PAGE 7 Approximately 2000 persons at tended the opening mass program of the Veterans ofForeign Wars and thenauxiliary at Roosevelt fieldhouse Friday evening when the annual memorial service was held Gov Bourke B Hickenlooper spoke and the tableaux pageant The Evolution of a Battle Cry was presented with members of the armed farces taking part Saturday the delegates were ad dressed by Max Singer past com mander in chief of the national V F W organization The convention will come toa close Sunday morning with the election and installation of officers HJ Reiber convention chair man opened the Friday night ceremonies by presenting the gov ernor and his party in a grand entry and turning the memorial ceremony over to Rob Roy Cer ncy chairman the service A beautiful ceremony was held by the officers of the group placing the flowers and wreath on the symbolic graves of de parted heroes Mrs GhirlotteiKieseibach sang Sleep and the Mason City band closed part of the sery ice evening frtimthe entry of the governor and his party to the playing of God Bless America by the Mason City municipal band the pageant Evolution of a Battle Cry topped all Staged on a brilliantly lighted set of patriotic colors and spark ling glitter the moving patriotic panorama showed the evolution of battle cries from Patrick Henrys Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death to Remember Pearl Har bor The familiar Spirit of the Yanks of 17 and army and WAACs the navy and WAVES the marines and women marines the air corps and aux iliary and the nurses of this war all marched onto the stage for the grand finale It was one of the most imposing spectacles of this kind ever attempted here on such a scale Dr H K Jones headed a long cast of characters and singers supplying the only speaking part as the voice for the pageant Preservation of government at home has been left in Ihe hands of those on the home front by the men who are dying out there on the seven seas Governor Hieken looper told the assembled dele gates and guests Take time to protect a system of freedom at home for those who are fighting abroad said Gover nor Hickenlooper so that they will not have to come home to a castle of freedom that has gone to pieces in their absence a castle of freedom that they have dreamed of and fought for I ask you to protect that sys tem of government and as American people I know yen will da Just that but lets never forget that eternal vigilance is the price of liberty Governor Hickenlooper said that much had been said about nazism and a centralized form of govern ment which enabled the axis powers to strike effective blows at the start of the war but that this year sees the beginning of a supreme effort of a free people Every person who can read the signs knows the might of a free people is now one and we arc marching against those who would rule and enslave We can see a great American people united with greater vigor than ever before This is not a war to conquer a common enemy in battle but a principle of how to live in the future and enjoy the fruits of gov ernment This organization and service men and women everywhere have a tremendous stake in great issues being decided They have ihe greatest stake of all in freedom and opportunity of self govern ment Members several service prcaeateri for 2000 Attend VF W FREEDOM LEFT IN OUR HANDS HICKENIOOPER Public Session ofa Battle Cry is yelt fieldhouse Friday night at the first open session of the Veterans of Foreign Wors and their auxiliary meeting in Mason Gity this week end for their state convention Below is a view of the crowd showing the reservedsec tion for Governor Bourke B Hickenlooper and his party photos Koyenoy engravings WHERE ELSE CAN THEY GO Demos Say South Has No Choice on 4th Term WASHINGTON UK D e m o cratic national committee leaders Saturday answered inquiries about a reported revolt in the solid south against the democratic party if President Roosevelt seeks a fourth the question Where else can they go Democratic committee leaders admitted that there were some protests from southerners about not getting what they consider a fair share of war patronage jobs but added that steps were being taken to remedy that situation They also admitted that the major objections of the solid south to Mr Roosevelts admin istration were based on his labor and racial policies But they refused to believe that those factors would cause a com plete bolt of the south from the democratic party They pointed out that the closest approach to a break in the solid south was in 1928 when Texas Florida North Carolina and Vir ginia voted for Herbert Hoover against Alfred E But they contended that there was less chance of even that much dis affection in 1944 Jecause no strong republican candidate has been proposed yet The talk of about the 1944 presidential elec growing here amid in creasing belief among political ob servers that Mr Roosevelt will be a candidate for a fourth term The background for the talk this week end will be the 25lh annual con ference of state governors at Co lumbus Ohio volunteers to join the ranks of armed forces L L Raymond chairman of the distinguished guest committee in troduced the overnors party which consisted of Ed Curtis sec retary of the bonus committee Clarence Knutson Clear Lake Chet Akers auditor of state Rob ert Blue lieutenant governor Wayne Ropes secretary state Henry Burma speaker of the house E B Stillman Clear Lake Capt Floyd Miller Lt Comdr Truman Jones Herman Krudson Mason City and Charles Barlow clerk of the supreme court Capt John Quiglcy veterans employ ment and AV L Bliss of the supreme court House Cuts OPA and OWI Budget Funds WASHINGTON Congress and committees dealt generously Friday with measures providing funds for direct war effort but tightened purse strings drastical Jy against several programs which members called less directly war connected The record follows Office of price administration house voted a cut below the MOOM committee recommenda tion for the priee agency for bade continuance of the food subsidy program beyond July 1 erected a bar against grade labeling or standardization of food or other products ordered replacement of persons whom congressmen have called theor ists and professors by men with at least five years experience in industries concerned Office of war information OWI house voted abolition of the domestic operations of Elmer Davis agency and cut 55300000 from its recommended funds National resources planning board house took final legislative action on the in dependent offices appropriation billwhich provided only to wind up the agencys affairs by Sept1 Board of economic warfare house rejected a move to cutthe funds of the or ganization set up to attempt eco nomic strangulation of the axis Smaller war plants corporation move to increase the appro priation for channeling war or ders to small producers was de feated in the house biggest navy sup Ply bill in Wstory was sent to the white house with contressmnal approval hrase appropria tions committee approved an Change Jap Plane Tally to 94 Down Over Guadalcanal ADVANCED U S BASE SOUTH PACIFIC UPJ An amended official report on the re sults of the greatest air battle ever fought over Guadalcanal said Sat urday that Americans destroyed 94 instead of 77 Japanese aircraft on Wednesday Food senate added 522000000 to the interior departments funds for developing irrigation projects to put more land into food crops MAKE RECORD SIGNUP FOREST un der the direction of the state mo tor vehicle department Mildred Johnston and Virginia Fields ob tained 720 renewals of drivers licenses at Lake Mills Friday This has been set as a record to shoot at in that county Pryor Burlington to Office of Imports in London Embassy BURLINGTON c Pryor Burlington attorney who has been serving on the board of economic warfare in Washington D C will go to England by plane within a couple of weeks to become chief administrative officer of the office of imports at the U S embassy in London Pryor now in Burlington said the trip will be made either in a ferried bomber or a PanAmerican plane He said his work will have largely to do with preventing stra tegic material from reaching axis nations Pryor formerly practiced law in Omaha and Council Bluffs He served from 1935 to 1937 as Iowa state relief administrator and later was assistant general council for the farm credit administration at Omaha He also served at one time as attorney for Iowa for the Chicago Burlington and Quincy railroad Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Slightly warmer Saturday afternoon highest temperature between 92 and 96 Uarmer Saturday night than Friday night Continued warm Sunday forenoon IOWA Scattered showers extreme northwest portion Saturday aft ernoon continued hot and windy MINNESOTA Little change in temperature Saturday night and Sunday forenoon Scattered thundershowers extreme south west and westcentral portions early Saturday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday afternoon SB Minimum Friday night 68 At 8 a m Saturday 73 At 11 a in Saturday 82 YEAR AGO Maximum 55 Minimum 52 Davis Says Budget Cut End of Me WASHINGTON fP Elmei Davis said Saturday he uould quit his job as director of the of fice of war information OWI if its domestic branch is abolished as the house voted to do Friday If the senate concurs with the opinion of the house there will be no OWI and that is thai the director toid an infor mal press conference He added it would also be the end of me as director was a combination over seas and domestic job that I was called down to do It the senate concurs in the house view that job is ended 11 will be the job ol somebody else to lake care o whatever they choose to do ii foreign information Davis replied also to accusa tions made by Ropresentativ Slarnes who told the house Friday that this country needed no Joseph Goebbels or Virginia Gayda There is quite a difference between me and Gaebbels as Mr Starnes would discover if he read the order by which President Roosevelt created OWI or followed our activi ties Davis remarked For one thing Dr Goebbels doesnt have to go to the reichstag for his ap propriation The house voted Friday nigh 218 to 114 to erase from the wai agencies appropriation bill the item for OWIs ho front operations me Army to Increase by Million to Dec 31 WASHINGTON on figures submitted to the house ap propriations committee and re visions made by the committee on the strength subsequent infoi mation here is how the army0 various units are expected to stand at the end of June and the end of December 1943 Male 5KTM4 3Spj WAAC oWl Enr WAAO JW KI Womtn nltrn tm ii Tkcrapr iMfi nc TOTALS 7I5IS3I ll3Kmi 1 Hi AtUl jlreittUi 31 IMS KILLED BY TRUCK SIOUX CITY Rober James Serdinsky 6 son of Mr anc Mrs Frank Serdinsky was Ia1all injured when he was run over a truck Friday S ITALY UNDER MARTIAL LAW ISLES POUNDED Nazis Fear Invasion Through Denmark Say June 22 Is Der Tag BULLETIN LONDON allied landing barces with cannon mounted on the bows were re ported by Spanish dispatches to be moving into the Mediterran ean theater Saturday as fascist Premier Benito Mussolini ex tended the emergency war zone to the entire southern and Adri atic coasts of Italy By ROGER GREENE Associated Press War Editor German fears that the allied in vasion armies may strike into Denmark northern gateway to the reich were reflected Saturday in reports that Adolf Hitlers high command had built up an elabo rate system of antiinvasion nerve centers in Jutland and posted heavier guards on Danish railways London quarters estimated that the Germans had recently in ncased their garrison in Denmark om 60000 to 200000 troops Allied seizure of the little kingdom 359 miles across the North sea from England would isolate German forces in Nor way and set the stage for a shortcut march on Berlin it self Stockholm advices said the Ger mans had built a series of camou flaged military towns in Jutland on the Danish north coast from which highly mobile units could be rushed to any danger point in Denrnarki The Germans have named June Der Tag for an allied invasion of the continent although neither Berlin nor Rome has offered more than wild guesses as to where the blow or blows would fall In the Mediterranean allied warplanes ill great strength re newed their paralyzing assault on Italys strongholds of Sicily and Sardinia shot up rail targets in nazioccupled Greece and attacked enemy shipping off he Grecian coast Dispatches from allied head quarters said the greatest force of American planes to go into action since the surrender of Pantelleria battered the Ital ian islands and shot down 39 enemy planes in combat The Italians said II persons were killed and 20 injured in a raid on Syracuse Sicily and listed 10 killed and 54 injured at Mes sina Northern Europe had a quiet first after a week long pounding of vital German war centers by KAF and Amer ican bombers Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers headquarters announced that strong force of U S flying for tresses from north Africa scored many hits on the ferry terminal at Messina Sicily only a few miles from the Italian mainland Along with these blows from north Africa Cairo headquarters reported that RAF heavy bombers set hangars and workshops afire al Comiso airdrome while RAF long range fighters kept up their at tacks on axis shipping in the Aegan While most observers be lieved the naw gestapo had too firm a grip on Italy to permit her to slide out of the war a British news agency dispatch from Algiers said ru mors were current in the French African capital Saturday morn ing that Italian peace emissar ies had arrived there Always a hotbed of rumors Al giers heard that Prince Umberto and Marshal Pietro Badoglio for mer chief of the Italian army general staff were mentioned envoys The rumors were discounted by informed observers although there was some speculation thai Germany might be willing to let her junior partner call it quits as more a hinderance than a help in defending Hitlers Europe fortress The German radio denied the rumors Berlin quoted a Rome dis patch saying the peace mission story was so absurd and sense less that it denies MRS GOODRELL DIES DES MOINES Alice M Goodrcll 88 whose late hus band was employed as a stationary engineer in connection with the building of the Iowa state capitol died Friday SIR ARCHIBALD WAVELL Field Marshal Wavell Named India Viceroy LONDON Great Britain aturday appointed Field Marshal Sir Archibald Percival Wavell Viceroy of India and announced the forthcoming formation of a lew East Asia command to direct he final death blow against Japan London press promptly hailed the Wavell appointment and ore dieted he would take the earliest jpportunity to emphasize that the British government intends to give India self rule as soon after the war as possible Gen Sir Claude J E Auchin leck was appointed to succeed Wavell as commander in India The separate command decision is presumably one of the major products of the Washington strategy conferences between President Roosevelt and Prima Minister Churchill Who would head the proposed east Asia command was not dis closed It was presumed ihit Ihe United States would collaborate fully with Britain in the east Asia command as she does with the Australians in the southwest Pacific and the British in north Africa The announcement from 10 oniiinjr street of Wavells ap pointment to a five year term succeeding Lord Iinlithgow and designation of Auchinleck to return to his former com mand in India comludcd It is proposed to relieve the commander in chief in India of responsibility for Hie conduct of operations against Japan and to set up a separate east Asia com mand for that purpose Further announcement on this subject vil be made soon This was taken by unofficial observers as a concrete expres sion of Britains intention to pros ecute the war against Jspan with full vigor once Hitler js defeated U appeared to put into a con crete plan the assurances given by Churchill in an address to con gress that Britain had an equal interest with Ihe United Stales ii avenging Japanese aggression There was every reason to believe that this plan germi nated in Washington where Sir Archibald and the air and naval commanders of Ihe Indian the ater joined Roosevelt and Churchill In exhaustive strategy talks Tiie action seemed to indicate the allied leaders were indeei looking beyond the end ot the European war and already laying the groundwork for an offensive to drive the Japanese back for final defeat in their home islands It appeared that Auchinleck India commander in 19M4I would have mainly a defensive task while Wavell whose posi tion roughly would bethat of a prime minister in relation o strategy would apply his mili tary knowledge as well as his political tact to Ihe complex task of the offensive Wavell is now in Britain and will return to India in the autumn to assume the post Viceroy which pays a year Auchinleck takes command ii India immediately little has beei heard of him since he was re placed in 1942 a commander SCRAP DRIVE SUCCESSFUL WORTHINGTON Minn More than 1113000 pounds o steel and iron scrap was collected m the Nobles county spring serai drive Cochairmen C D Nelson and George Otmans reported Sat urday In a separate drive Worth in glon businesswomen collected more than 1000 pounds of rag and about 2200 pounds of scrap tin All Nobles county busines houses were closed the last day the scrap campaign 45000 MINERS DONT WAIT FOR END OF TRUCE UMW Leaders and Coal Operators Will Confer to Avert New Tieup By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON The united nine workers and the soft coal operators agreed to return to the onferencetable Saturday to seek i basis for averting another tie up of the nations mines with ihe expiration of the working truce Sunday midnight Even as this uas disclosed a compilation from the mine fields showed that more than miners already had left their jobs in protest against the war labor boards WLB re fusal to approve pay for under ground travel time An informed source disclosing jlans for a midafternoon meet ng said the miners and the oper itors have not necessarily agreed o resume collective bargaining on the merits ot the demands f the miners but would see vhat can be done about the war abor board order UMW policy committee faced crucial decision as the deadline of their nostrike truce neared Their travel pay demands re jected by the war labor board WLB the truce runs out Sun day midnight But already more than 5000 of the nations half million miners have stopped work in protest against the boards stand Tensionwas intensified as Lew is postponed the policy coiumittee meeting scheduled for10a m central war time presumably to give him more time to consult with lieutenants on the implica tions of the WLB order referring the miners portaltoportai pay claim to the wage arid hour ad ministrator he federal courts or collective bargaining as the UMW leadership chooses Lewis went into session in the forenoon with his district presi dents but a spokesman said a statement of any kind is unlikely in advance of the full policy meeting late in the day A delegation of six miners from Mogan county West Virginia came to Washington with a re quest for admission to the white house to present their case UMW headquarters telephoned presi dential secretary Marvin Mcln tyre who agreed to see the group Meanwhile Undersecretary of War Robert Patterson asserted Saturday that industry failed by 5Vi percent to meet production needs of the army ground forces last month He said this failure of May production is the most critical single ooccurencc in the army supply program He added that Failure to ap preciate the gravity of our sit uation and the need for contin ued increased efforts to meet our continually increasing needs is evidenced by the coal strike the Akron strikes and other stoppages in war and related in dustries and by the tendency of certain manufacturers to divert too much time thought and energy to the design and devel opment of competitive civiliau nonessentials Patterson declared that the army has the men and transportation industry has the men and mater ials then added Management and labor must deliver the sup plies on schedule and as planned or the opportunity to exploit recent military successes will be lost This is the most critical period in military supply Too little and too late now will cost thousands of lives tomorrow The UMW acting afler a com mand by President Hoosevelt stopped the last walkout June 1 but ordered the men to work only until midnight June 20 while negotiations proceeded on de mands for a a day pay boost representing underground travel time The operators declared all along they felt they owed the miners nothing Signs of unrest appeared imme diately after the WLB announce ment that portaltoportal pay represented an unknown liabil ity under the fair labor stand ards act and was therefore a case for the courts to decide The alternative was for Mie union and the operators to settle out of court but within the na tional stabilization policy All mines producing fuel the mafer Alabama rfecl pames were clwed Saiwtey   

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