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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, June 2, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - June 2, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSFAttft THAT VOL XLIX MAKIS AU NORTH iOWANS NEIGHIOKS ASSOCIATED UjgTTO MASON CITY IQWA WEDNESDAY JUNE 2 HOME EDITION mini THIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS m SECTION ONE JLCHECKSSTRIKE BACK TO m 1500 JAPANESE KILLED IN 20 DAYS ON ATTU Total Nipponese Toll May Be Much Higher Navy Spokesman Says WASHINGTON If More than 1500 Japanese were killet and four were captured duvini the first 20 days of fighting on Attu Island the navy reported Wednesday as operations on the formerly enemyheld island con tinued in a mopping up phase A communique said that from the start oj the American invasion of Attu May 11 through midnight of May 30 the enemy casualties were so estimated A n a v j spokesman amplifyingrsaid that the estimate was based on an ac tual count of bodies and that the total number killed might have been aO or 100 per cent greater It would be impossible for in stance to estimate the number by high explosive naval killed shells or those buried by comrades under the snow their w The number of enemy soldiers remaining on Attu could not be estimated therefore even tAough the Japanese have reported that there were approximately 3 000 of their force on the island to start with and also reliable es helc havc 3000 around Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Showers and thun derstorms rather heavy at times Wednesday afternoon Wednes day night and Thursday fore noon fresh to strong winds and J cohtinued IOVVA Moderate to locaiiy heavy and thunderstorms Wednesday night and Thurs day forenoon Continued warm except cooler in northwest por tion Thursday forenoon Fresh to moderately strong winds MINNESOTA Showers and thun derstorms south and central and rain extreme north Wednesday nightr occasional ram Thursday forenoon not much change in temperature except cooler south portion to Thursday forenoon fresh moderately strong winds IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday Hfi Tuesday night 65 8 a m Wednesday eg Ham 18 inch YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation 1 j WASHINGTON Destruc tion of a German submarine and capture of 40 members of hci crew by the coast guard cuttei Spencer was reported by the navy Wednesday With depth charges and roar ing guns the cutter sank thc sub marine in thc Atlantic several weeks ngo when the raider was detected lurking in the path of a larjre and important convoy making for an allied port Completely submerged and with her periscope down the submarine was located by Sound man Harold V Anderson Ke wanec III and the Spencer commanded by Commander Bar S Berdine 4 Staten Island made two depth charge runs over Efforts by the submarine t under convoy in hope that the noise the V WMlM with the Spencers detection devices failed and the cutter remained on the raiders trail and dropped a third basket The worst threat was now over the navy related Not a fish had been tired nor had a ship been touched However the cutter still continued her pursuit The u S coast guard cutter Duane charged in to assist and the Spencer made readv to let go with her fourth attack when a lookout shouted Conning towsr on the port quarter Gun crews on both the ships trained their guns instantly on the submarine and opened a withering effective fire At the same time the Spencer ratig up full speed and headed tor the Uboat prepared to ram Dafoe Who Attended Dionne Quins at Birth Dies at 60 Succumbs to Pneumonia 5 Minutes After Being Admitted to Hospital NORTH BAY Ont Allen Roy Dafoe the country physician who gained world fame by attending the Dionne quintup lets at their birth nine years ago died Wednesday of pneumonia after a brief illness He was 60 years old The fivelittle whose physician Dafoe had been until a disagreement broucht on his resignation last year celebrated their birthday last Friday Dr Dafoe died at 11 a m five minutes after being admitted to a hospital here Dr D A Campbell of North Bay whowas at the bedside said death was due to pneumonia Dr Dafoe had returned to his home at Callander from Toronto Wednesday morning Two years April H Dafoe underwent a ma jor operation the nature of which was not disclosed It was on February H l14 that Dr Dafoe finally gave up his connection with the quintuplets He offered his resignation lo Pre KALtEN ROY DAFOE mieiMitchell Hepburn then truer of Ontario because his posi tion has been made almost impos sible by reason of the fact that the children are not allowed to speak English Later the physician said he quit because I felt that my usefulness had come to an end Dr Dafoe was an obscure coun try doctor in sparsely settled northern Ontario Canada until May 28 1934 when he sprang into fame over night by bringing the Dionne quintuplets into the world For 27 years before that he had worked along the frontier honored andi unsungbringing or dinary babies to lifemending the torn bodies of injured lumber r men and fighting north country blizzards to the aver age ills ot men women and chil dren At 4 oclock in the morning of that eventful May day he was awakened at his home in Callen der his by a vigorous pounding on front door It was Oliva was Dionne the father of the quits So he hurried to the humble Dionne home where he found L confusion in the dim babies already had been born prematurely and no arrangements for their advent had teen made The father disap peared but two midwives were maKing up wrappings hurriedly ir ncw arrivas and building He rolled up his sleeves and soon three other babies crying were bom The life and keeping the spark of We alive in the f newly born Constantly it seemed as it tlie tiny infants were tic wrapped them about to die in the only y covering remnants of old cotton sheeting and napkins Jam tnem in a corner of the bed and covered them with a heated blanket Then Mrs Dionne rallied and Dr Defoe surprised to find the babies still alive gave his undi vided attention to them For 24 hours he fed them a few drops of warm water from an eyedroppe sympT him Flash Fldoels Cause Widespread Damage in Johnson County C1TY floods widespread damage in Johnson county Tuesday night routing families from their homes drowning livestock and washing out hi out highways railroad bridges and crops tracks Rhine creek Oxford and Clear creek at Tif fin both west of Iowa City were ling Wednesday but the owa nT SUU riSing Wednesday At Oxford IG miles away the overflow water of Rhine creek nto thc washed out ldgf and raced through of the n Kmney blacksmith shop thc crcst HRAUD NAMES i GAULLE FO 0 DEPUTY JO More Confusion Adds to Strain in Setting Up New French Rule Gen Henri Vice Admiral ALGIERS Giraud appointed Emile Muselier deputy to him self as commanderinchief and charged him with maintaining order in Algiers and vicinity Wednesday in the midst of confu sion and strain attending the birth pangs of the new French govern ing body Thisappointment followed a slrance exchange of letters in which Ala reel Peyrouton who once signed an order for the ar rest of Gen Charles De Gaulle submitted his doublebarreled resignation to De Gaulle jnd Giraud from his post as gov ernor general in Algeria in re sponse to De Gaulles demands for a housecleanlne The appointment of Muselier former member of the Fighting French hierarchy who later broke with De Gaulle and is now re garded as his bitter opponent was expected to add to the in creasing tension between the French factions v day came togethei cw tvecu tive committee for the purpose of giving unified direction to the French war effort De Gaulle had Muselier under house arrest in London at one time after Muselier had taken the lead in the Fighting French occu pation of St Pierre and Miquelon islands off the Newfoundland coast He is now the chief police man of the district in which DC Gaulle lives Peyrouton one of the contro versial figures of the North African situation who once served Vichy as minister of in terior and then as ambassador to Argentina offered his resig nation Tuesday both to De Gaulle and Giraud as joint presidents of the executive com mittee which is to govern liber ated Frenchmen and French ter ritory until France is freed He asked botn to give him back his old rank of captain in the colonial infantry reserve He got a doublebarreled reply DC Gaulle accepted the resigna ion promptly and assigned him 0 5yria Giraud accepted the osignation but asked him to hold Viw if for the being Menll Mueller NBC corre fndwtn a broadcast from Al Wednesday said De Gaulles AntiStrike Bill Taken Up in House W A S H 1 N G T O N house Wednesday began formal consideration of the SmithCon nally antistrike bill after votinc down 211 to 1B3 a bipartisan move lo block its immediate con sideration The action presaged one ot the bitterest congressional labor de bates in history It came after a heated onehour dispute on a vule to govern consideration of the bill Supporters of the measure gave the coal stoppage as their princi pal argument for acting now Much of the opposition to its consideration came from republi can members of the house mili tary affairs committee which some weeks ago voted 21 lo 0 o send the proposal lo thc house floor administration contends the bill would impair the no strike pledge which most labor has ob served and would recognize ah nnpUcd right to strike during war time tinder certain procedure out lined m the measure These in clude a secret strike ballot and a 30 day coohng off period before a strike call could become efice live Took One Lesson and jd He WaS Minister Tned to Evade Draft r necko a friend of one of the six nazi saboteurs electrocuted last summer took only one Bible les son and claimed to be an ordained minister witnesses testified at his draft evasion trial 4 Wernockc former German American bund leader who al legedly used his farm near here as adnll ground lor bund is beingtried oncharges of evading military service by pre tending to be a clergyman Officials of Wcrneekes draft said they had classified him 4D because he claimed to have been ordained as a minister and to have attended Moody Bible in stitute Officials of the Bible institute said he had enrolled in a corre spondence course but completed only one lesson on which he barely received a passing grade was a friend of Her bert Hans Haupt former Chicago high school student who went to Germany for sabotage trainin and returned in a nazi Uboat with other saboteurs in an attempt to wreck U S war industries 3 DIE OF FOOD POISONING SANTA ROSA K Mex Food poisoning reportedly from hJ foods left three TRADE TREATY LAW EXTENDED 2 MORE YEARS Senate Beats Off Attempts to Place Curbs on F R Powers WASHINGTON sen ate completed legislative actio Wednesday on a measure extend ing for two more years without change the presidents authoritj to make reciprocal trade agree ments with other nations Final passage was by a vote of The legislation which now goes lo the white house Tor President Roosevelts approval contains ex ecutive authority lo adjust tariffs downward oiupward 50 per cent in return for reciprocal action by the country with which an ag ment is made Under the most favored tioi clause similar advantages are extended to countries which do not discriminate against Amer ican products Renewal of the authority with out change in its form was a vic tory lor Secretary of State Hull who insisted any alteration would be interpreted abroad as casting loubl on the desire of congress to lave this nation cooperate with others in solving postwar prob cras Critics replied that postwar pol cies are not at issue adding that since little can be done toward tariffs in war time the extension has no particular sig nificance Before the final vote the senate turned down a long series of amendments most of them offered by democrats NAZIS TELt OF NEW RED DRIVE Report 5 Soviet Tank Brigades Make Attack By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The International Information Bureau German progapanda agen cy said in a Berlin broadcast Wednesday that a new phase of the battle for the Kuban bridge head had opened with the Rus sians sending five new lank bri gades and several rifle divisions into a large scale attack at dawn Tuesday Thc broadcast was re corded by the Associated Press Thc agency which sometimes issues reports which DNB the of ficial news agency does not wish lo sponsor said the attack was preceded by a heavy artillery and mortar bombardment Monday night and admitted some penetra Lewis Is Warned by loivan New Guinea Hospital NEW YORK Bj ron M Edgett of DCS Moine Iowa now in an army hospital i Guinea has written an ope letter to John L Lewis warnin the united mine workers presidei that the coal strike may cost h lives of thousands of men an that one day those of us who d return will call for a strict at o tin ting The letter was broadcast ove the Columbia network Wcdiies day by George Moorau Columbi correspondent in Australia The text of Edgetts letter i carried by Columbia If ff 1 am a soldier confined to a hospital in New Guinea ui vorced from army functions und ability to assist the war effort as a civilian and I even futiut with the news coal miners under your domination Knowing the h a r dheaded powerstricken selfish attitud you have assumed toward you government it is with small hop of influencing your actions tha this is written In this hospila there are fellows who have spen irom a year to eighteen month overseas Some are engineers wh went through the Milne bav car nage the Philippines and lav campaigns some are artillery men and air force About 50 pe cent have wives and half thi number have families to support Our average income includin government benefits is S100 month S h o u Id we strike fmhighe wages What would your reactioi be in our place Living in mm and dust fighting vermin an mosquitos suffering under blazing sun and always waitin for planes an to read that American at home are too concerned wit personal welfare to worry abou our precarious pery with the blood of our com rades Are we or are we not en titled to 100 per cent support froi our country Would you like to think Mr Lewis that by lengthening the war by a day a week a month you have eost lives of thousands of men unselfish men miners have fathers ons and brothers in the serv ce When they realize that fol owmg your dictates will mean hat more of their loved ones are lot corning home how will yoi nnintain that you have been then hampion STOLE SUGAfi SENTENCED MINNEAPOLIS E Bvossard 38 of Mankato Wednes day was sentenced to no days in the on thc provision he leave theft of 100 pounds of sugar valued at and he was weighed dow Saiita Rosa residents dead and lOthing else has since he took over fourth seriously ill in a Las Vegas Nazi Sub can was the first sneak into thc midst As the with the light mm Ibere The Spencers lifeboats were rMdted a wa cat in Submanne crewmen who made tor thc heavy deck gun however were driven back by from the d aLler round was Pumped n o the undersea raider and afler part of the connin tower was comuletely torn away Then hC Spcncer the of ramming the from the submarine suddenly ceased and many members of her crew were observed abandoning ship through the conning tower The cutter turned aside and to resume thc as sault but the battle was over The Uboats propellers stopped dropped lower in the water then rapidly plummeted down Cfrclhic the more than submarine crew members who were float ing in the water snpportcd by and life bells locating the sarvivors was not dif MMC were on rafts the adrift bnt of them by their cs tmti which were ased as me Newrthelcss as they awaited rescue they acted in a very hys terical manner shouting and wav ing arms so frantically that no doubt was left as to their exis tence and location Thc sea smooth there was a moderate breeze and conditions were gen erally fair No doubt the depth chafes and heavy gunfire had unnerved them several were still hysterical on coming aboard AH t prisoners were impressed bv the deadlines of the depth charges Several threw up their hands and exclaimed wasserbombs terrible terrible And the navy added now thc men of the Spencers crew can had sworn not lo shave until heir ship had a posi tive submarine sinking to her NO 202 TELLS MINERS OPERATORS TO CLOSE PARLEYS Charges Any Agreement Under Strike Coercion Will Not Be Approved WASHINGTON war labor board checked the coal mine walkout back to President Roose i Wednesday for such action he deems appropriate and told lu negotiations UMA President John L Lewis nd the operators representatives HI kegun on fresh efforts to etlie their dispute which has re itaylnwana01 milliori mnes war vftal l tlC However said the board unan imously agreement on he issues by the parties while the uorkers are on strike and the negotiators are subject to strike coercionwill not be considered or appro veil The miners and thc operator nlonned of the boards order eily while waiting for board from The message was addressed to Lewis Edward R Burke mesi clent of the southern coal produc association Charles ONcil Nelson Steel to Face Sharp Drop Late This Week WASHINGTON JP chair man Donald M of the war production board said Wednesday thatUnited Stales sled production will il r o n Miarply late ltlis week unless a flow of coal to steel vlntits is maiiilametl anil practical Marl alysis of the war production Program will follow any serious curtailment of coal supplies In a special statement to thc press on he strike in thc coal industry Said r notinvolved in the coal dispute as such but I am seriously con ccrucd about the levaslatin and inevitable effect of any curtailment of he flow of coal lo industry upon our output of Hie weapons of war While steel was listed as lip principal industry threatened Acisnu said immediate damage may be done also lo tlic produc tion f bcn7ol or aviation caso Ime and synthetic rubber aim alsit to the output f various chemicals used i explosives nlastics ami medicine hairman of the operators nego lating committee of the Appala nian joint conference and Ezra Horn chairman of the joint cgotiating committee The May 2 directive ordered resumption of ciilleclivc bar IK on major issues such as pay thc six day xvcck charts for cnuin nent used by the miners arid certain contract wording The order called for a report to ie WLI wilhm 10 days and said the parlies shall continue the un ntcriupted production of coal un cr the contract terms and condi C and Lewis ih C anothcr conference the expressed intention of fio at tne problem from the be inmng and United ne President John enr ana ence in Uashmgton with the expressed mtenlioi of K0ing at proWcm from Ihe beKin V This was decided on after each rejected the others com ffrs the OOfinn lrucc cxjircc and coal diggers quit work Internor Secretary tckcs termed heir actoir a strike against the overnmcnt As fuels administra or ne lias been operating the lines by presidential direction Ickcs urRinK resumption of work declared Lewis could not escape responsibility for the sloppage and at the time criticized a few powerful oper for what he called their uncompromising attitudes Lewis said thc government ap eai to gel thc mines going again kcs estimated hat only 49 ays supply oC coal lies above   

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