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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: May 1, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - May 1, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORy AND I THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS SATURDAY MAY 1 1043 VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS KUli FIVE CENTS A MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY MAY 11943 SEIZE MINES THIS PAPEIl CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 175 F R Calls on Men to Start Work for U S V I Ickes to Have Army Protect Men Going Back to Work ti ij i U S Troops Break Through Heavy Artillery Fire to Take 3 Important Positions HEAVY ATTACK MADE ON ESSEN BY RAF PLANES 13 Bombers Missing After Night Assaults on Ruhr District LONDON RAFmode a heavy attack Friday night on Essen and other Ruhr valley tar gets in uestern Germany and Sat urday several squadrons of heavy bombers believed to be American liberators or fortresses or both flew across tlie channel to continue the assaut on the nazi war poten tial The daylight bombers flew at great height and appeared headed for the Cherbourg peninsula per haps to pound anew Hitlers sub marine bases The air ministry announced that 13 bombers were lost Friday nisrht duringthe fourth attack i of April on the Ruhr valley concentration point of heavy German steel and coal industry if 3 The German communique rec orded from Berlin broadcasts said considerable damage was caused at Essen and other places in west ern Germany Continental weather conditions probably caused the raiders lo scatter over several targets instead I of loosing one saturation raid the observers said The other objec tives were not immediately iden tified The most recent visit to the Ruhr area was Monday night when the RAF battered Essen itself has been bombed 55 limes since the bcginnins of the war and 900 Ions of blockbusters British Fighter Pilot Brings Down 5 Junker Transports by Himself By VIRGIL PINKLEV ALLIED HEADQUARTERS NORTH AFRICA infantry has broken through heavy artillery fire on the north Tunisian front to capture three important German positions including stra tegic Taheut hill on the road to Ma tour junction while allied air planes sank two destroyers and three other ships and destroyed live more axis air transports c United States longrange ar tillery began shcllinr Mafeur again immediately after Ameri can troops in a surprise uttack stormed up Tahcnt hill also known us hill 13 miles southwest of the key enemy communications center Other American advance units within sight of Bizcrte pushed close to the road running west of Lake Achkct from Bizerte to teur and Tebourba The Americans captured more than 200 prisoners in closing in on JMaleur On other sectors the British first army was forced to make a slight withdrawal of advance units on the Djebel Bou Aoukaz front cast of MedjezElBab where the Germ a n s continued extremely heavy counterattacks with tanks and Cfercl heavy losses The British eighth army on the southern front made slight local gains Probably the most spectacular incident of Fridays heavy ins in tlie air was the perform ance of Flight Sgt A B Down ing a British bcaufiffhler pilot who brought down five German TUS2 air transports in a single handed attach during allied 011 slatiKhls against enemy supply lines John L Lewis left president of the united mine work ers and President Roosevelt right lave reached the cli in their dispute over the clnet executives hold the line order The UMW struck for pay increases over those allowed under the Little Steel formula and the president ordered the mines taken over by the government Fire Destroys Night Club Near Charles City President Acts When Lewis Ignores Time for Work Resumption WASHINGTON Roosevelt ordered the nations coal mines taken over Saturday by the federal gov ernment and he appealed over the head of Union President John L Lewis for striking miners to return immediately to the mines and work for their yovenuncnl Mr Uoosevelf directed Secretary of Interior Harold L Ickes to take over and operate ihe mines with the army providing protection Then in a formal statement the president declared that the national interest is in grave peril because except in a few mines the production of coal has virtually ceased More than half a million miners ware idle Saturday I now call upon all miners who may have abandoned their work to return immediately to the mines and work for their government the president said Their country needs their services as much as T TT those of the members of the Lewis Has No Comment on Seizure Report Giant Allied Ship Armada Moving East Through Gibraltar Straits By ROGER GREENE Associated Press War Editor The Berlin radio declared Saturday that a giant armada of allied warships was moving eastward through the Straits of Gibraltar The Berlin radios report of an enormous allied fleet passing east ward through the Gibraltar bottleneck lacked confirmation else where but touched off tion 011 these possibilities taken during the following days showed that the vital Knipp works there was idle for 10 days because of the were dropped on it in the last London as observer shot down previous raid Aoril 3 four of the big transports in six minutes as they flew northward near CagUari enroutc from Tunis He had to chase the fifth one for four minutes before sending it down in flames We got them just at dawn Lyons said The first one fell into the sea Three others were fly ing abreast We got them As they crashed into the sen men spilled out They were wearing yellow skull caps and some of them man aged to inflate n dinghy despite the facttheir plane was on fire Friday nights losses brought the toll of RAF bombers to G02 since the beginning of the year The losses were not unexpected con sidering the fact that the weight of bombs delivered on each misj sion has tripled since last year Indicative of the new tempo of 1 With Tunisian land fighting deadlocked by stiffening German Downing with Sgt J Lyons of j defenses the fleet might be cn Ioute to strike at the enemy rear along the Gulf of Tunis Z It might be moving to cul off the line of axis escape from the North African bridgehead 3 Or finally it might even be directed against the enemys vital supply bases in Sicily and Sar dinia An axis dispatch from La Linea Spain next door to Gib raltar said the movement in cluded a huge convoy guarded by the air offensive the in lin In attacks on enemy supply es allied nirnlnncs also 3is monthly losses Jj in January KMjrupted the axis efforts lo net move and men lo their hardpressed in February 158 in March and 2K1 in April The RAF had a lull in its bom bings of Germany after hitting the naval base at Wilhchrshaven ami heavily mining Baltic waters Wednesday night Will Melt 13000000 Silver Dollars to Get Vital War Metal DENVER west where silver dollars are important part of pocket change will pour 13000000 of the coins into a fur nace for the first time Moses E Smith Denver mint superintend ent said the badly worn or mu tilated dollars will be melted to extract 713000 pounds of silver fuel troops in Tunisia Saturdays communique said Hint one destroyer was sunk by American Mitchell bombers and another set afire but head onirlers adriccs said the second destroyer also sank off the Tu nisian coast Three other ships were sunk and three others in cluding a light cruiser were hil The cruiser was Icfl burning In all eight axis vessels were sunk or damaged Friday was n big day for allied airplanes although most of their operations were centered on at tacking German positions along the Tunisian land front A total of 18 enemy planes was shot down including the five air transports destroyed by downing wlilc UK the British battleships Rodney and Iilalaya the battle cruiser Renown and the aircraft carriers lvhich I toe CEDftR INN LOSS PUT AT SI 8000 in Foodstuffs Cash Included CHARLES Cedar Inn one of he states oldest night clubs located on highways 218 and 18 and operated by Ralph Wright was destroyed early Saturday morning of the fire is unknown by fire The loss of the building and its scls Spanish observers arc con vinced that major action in Hie Mediterranean is imminent the broadcast said In this connection it was re called thnt axis radios Jast year gave the first information on the massing of warships at Gibraltar which preceded the allied landing in French Morocco foodstuffs approxi mllcly g3000 S2noou Wright said Approximately SliiUO worth of foocistuffs were de stroyed in the blaze according ID and other vital metals needed in allies lost seven aircraft war production On the land front the most im portant gains were by the Ameri can 2nd corps in the norih but on the west central front some 12 miles east of Medjez the British first army still was locked in exceptionally heavy fighting against repeated nazi counter attacks the communique said A I dispatch from the front however i emphasized that the Germans liad 1 failed lo wrest the initiative from the British In one area our forward troops were forced to make a slight withdrawal but elsewhere all our positions were firmly held the communique said A German communique Satur day reported axis counterattacks in Tunisia and said that the al lies had lost 08 tanks 21 armored cars and several hundred pris oners At Cairo a communique said that American liberator bombers attacked the Sicilian port of Messina in daylight Friday caus ing tremendous fires and explo sions around the port and power station One bomber was lost Local Man Killed in Cement Bin Tony Seryanicz 37 who lived I foreman Charles Baker am he to work only three weeks io wilh Ins brother at 209 Fifth street and Claire Graham Rtchard Blake om mcc UCCKs BRITISH SUBS SINK 10 SHIPS Attacks Made on Supply Boats in Mediterranean LONDON more en emy ships have been sunk in the Mediterranean by British subma rines the admiralty announced Saturday Among the ships sunk said the communique was a large tanker torpedoed near Marittimo island while west bound on n course for Tunis She was escorted by an un usually large number of surface craft and aircraft Another tanker was sunk by gunfire off Italys west coast and a large ammunition ship was blown up off the island of Monte Cristo between Italy and Corsica Other sinkings were off tlie cast const of Corsica northwest of Sicily and off the northern tip of Tunisia One vessel apparently had been previously damaged bv air attack the admiralty said Mr Wrighl Also lost S200 in currency which had nol been placed in the safe The lire was discovered at Salurdoy Pangburn morning by Mr Wrighls Alfred utility man who sleeps in ihe building The business had been closed at Saturday morning As late as E a m canned goods wcro coii linuing lo explode Mr Wright first started Hie club in The original building was destroyed by fire in The new building was erected in Because llic building was outside ihc cily limits the Charles City five department coudlnl be of I any assistance in fighting the blaze US Without Unity Nippon Times States By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Nippon Times Japanese foreign office organ declared edi torially Saturday that the United States coal strike was a direct challenge to governmental power in wartime and something inconceivable in Japan Ihiit is where everyone is putting his shoulder to the wheel Excerpts of the editorial were broadcast by the Tokyo radio and recorded by the Associated Press Roosevelt was vacillating in his negotiations with the labor leader I lie Nippon Times editor ial added according to radio To kyo This was attributed to fourth leim aspirations The seriousness of the situa tion is at once clear from the pre diction already made by Ameri can steel companies that if a gen eral strike of coal miners were called they would have to seri ously curtail steel production within Uvo weeks the broadcast editorial added A strike of such proportions nevertheless is iuconteslible proof BULLETIN NEW YORK URJ John L Lewis United Mine Workers president said Saturday he had comment lo make on Presi dent Roosvelts order directing Secretary of Interior Harold Ickes to take possession of all coal mines By THE ASSOCIATED IKESS The 10 oclock deadline set by President Roosevelt for fullscale resumption of coal mining came and passed Saturday with the united mine workers following instead the advice of their union president John L Lewis not lo trespass on their places of work Instead of with out rcsorlinsr to a general strike which Ihc president has said might he as crippling as a mili tary defeat in Hie 1icld Ihcy simply stayed away frmii work by the lens of thousands v At 10 a m Lewis was closeted with several mine union represen tatives in the united mine work ers office on the llth floor of the Hotel Roosevelt New York City When he entered the offices a halt hour earlier he had refused all comment but his office said he intended to attend negotiations between hard coal miners andop erators scheduled Saturday in the armed forces Mr Roosevelt will talk di rcclly to the minors via radio Sunday night at 0 p in CWT Ickes iaiinuilialclv sent lelc grams to eoal com IKimos directing them to as sume opera lion of their mines as opcniliiiK managers for the government The presidents statement noted that the cost ot living in the min ing areas is under and that the government will cor rect any price violations lie again urged the united mine workers lo rest their S2aclay wage increase demand with the war labor board and promised that the case would be determined promptly fairly and in accord ance with Me procedure of law applicable to alt labor disputes with any wage adjustments ap retroactively Lewis refusal lo deal with the board brought on the final crisis that caused lie mine shutdown Saturday m defiance of au ul timatum by tlie president Tlie itrodmUuu of coal must and shall continue IVIr Koosc vclt reiterating that the strike is a direct interference wilh the prosecution of the war In his order for government possession of the mines Mr Roosevell said that work slop pages ami strikes in the coal mines necessitated this action to protect the interests of the nation at war and Hie righls of workers to cou tiicre is no unity m the soulhwest in Mason City was suf focated in a cement bin at about Friday afternoon at the Le high Portland Cement company Servantoz was working in the bin with Herman Gonzales who left the scene at Fifteen minutes later the assistant foreman George Johnson went into the bin lo call Scrvantcr and discovered his hand prolrudirig from a pile of cement on the opposite side of the bin from where he had been working wjlh Gonzales earlier Johnson immediately called hc and Johnson managed to extricate Servanlez body from the pile ac cording to County Coroner R E Buy Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobcGazcltc carrier boy Surviving arc two brothers Frank of Mason City and DanicJ of Coachella Cal Smiley Funeral services will be held Artificial respiration was started j Tuesday morning at 9 oclock at the St Joseph Catholic church with Father Gerald Gteiert of ficiating Burial will be at St Jo sephs Catholic cemetery The Rosary will be said at the by the workers at once and the fire department responded wilh a res pirator to no avail Servantez was born June 13 J I ib wl I IIHJ JJU7 in Mexico Ho ame lo Jiason Servanlez residence 209 Fifth Lily m 1022 and was employed al I slrect southwest at 8 oclock Sat thc Lchigh plant for a number of inday Sunday and Monday eve years Recently he Had not been nings The Patterson funeral home working there bill had relumed in charge News for Those in Service Families and friends of men and women in service should not overlook the weekly GlobeGazette diary on Page 8 Clip it out and mail il lo them as an extra letter from home If they are outside the United States send it air mail for an early delivery LEAVES 5237702 ESTATE DES MOINES I Blank treasurer of the TriStatcs and Centra States Theaters cor porations who died here last March left an estate valued at 5297702 according lo the prelim inary inheritance tax report filed in district court Friday Myron Blank 31 a brother was named sole beneficiary Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Warmer Salurday aftcrnoon and night All tem peratures above freezing Show ers late Saturday night and early Sunday Winds becoming strong IOWA Warmer Saturday night and Sunday forenoon scattered showers west and north central portions late Saturday night and Sunday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday Minimum Friday night At 8 a m Saturday YEAR AGO Maximum ao Minimum 56 Precipitation 11 United Stntcs regarding Ihe pro scculioii of Ihe war Thai how ever is not strange when ihe masses in Ihe United Slalcn still arc in the wilderness regarding the real war aims of Ihe govern Waldorf Astoria hotel At Lewis left Ihe nt office to go to the Waldorf As lie I rhc lie gave Ickes was strode down Ihe rtoosevclt without limn Mr Kouse dor with his hut on his lop coat vcU llls was baccl on thrown over his left shoulder and tho powers vested in him by Hie cigar in his mouth he was asked tonslitulion ihc laws of the nation as president as well a commander in chief ot the army olhcr phases of the work stoppage UK llav he said to if he had any comment on the passing of the 10 a m deadline or Gcnllcmen1 the Ickes was directed 10 HORSES IN DERBY RAGE SPORTS BULLETIN CHURCHILL DOWNS Louis ville Ky Wrighl the Chicago and Lexington Ky sporlsman announced Saturday that he had decided not lo start1 minium hix Ocean Wave in the BQth Kenj miners refused lo enter the pils in newsmen I have 110 comment this morning Thank you Accompanied by lohn 1 Tones president of district 111 Cumberland ML Lewis went to the blocks away a taxicab Upon his arrival at the Waldorf he went immediately to the an thracite conference room on the fourlli floor The anthracite conference got underway al a m behind closed doors Both bituminous and anthracite To take immediate possession so far as mjy be necessary or de sirable of any and all mines pro I ducing coal in which a strike or j stoppage has occurred or is threat ened together witli any and all real and personal properly fran chises rights facilities funds and other assets vised in conncclioii wilh Ihc operation of such mines To operate or arrange for the operation of such mines And to do all things necessary or or incidental to the production sale and distribution of coal the absence of a wage contract between the operators and the united mine workers of America lucky derby late Saturday after noon i decision that left he STo 000 run for the roses virtually at the mercy of the mighty Count j nl icn Bond Drive May Top 16 contenders since Twoses one half of the entry of W E Boeing the Soatle airplane manufacturer had been withdrawn earlier The crowd numbered about 40 000 as compared with the usual turnout ot 00000 Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobcGazcttc carrier boy Predict Surprise Blackout Soon SEE STORY OX PAGE 8 Authorizing Fckcs to act with the aid wf any public or private instrumentality or person he de sires the president instructed him lo permit the management lo continue ils managerial func tions to the maximum degree possible consistent with Ihc aims of this order y Ickes also was instructed to recognize the right of the workers to continue their membership in any labor organization to bargain collectively through representa tives of their own choosing and to engage in concerted activities for Ihe purpose of collective bargain ing or other mutual aid or prolcc lion provided thai such conccrled Billion Sponsors Dont Want to Stop There WASHINGTON 000000000 war loan drive biggest in hislory is officially expected to top 516000000000 but ils sponsors dont want to stop there Under secretary Daniel W Bell of the treasury reporting approximately received up until i activities do not interfere with the Friday night said that intensive 1 operations of the mines bondbuying is urged right up unj Ickes directed the mine owners til the closing minute of the cam to fly Ihc United States flag over paign at midnight Saturday their property to show that it is   

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