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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 28, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 28, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             svsrJ HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR FULL SHARE COUP DEPARTMENT OF H I S T 0 R Y A M j A R C H I V U 5 I 0 I h E 5 l A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIBE3 FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY APRIL 28 1943 1HIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE HOME EDITION liiiiir NO 172 US STOP MS HILLS ON BIZERTE ROAD DISPUTE FADES Polish Government in Exile Wont Withdraw Request for Inquiry LONDON UR Any chance for an early reconciliation be tween the Poles and Russians faded Wednesday night when the Polish government in exile ap pealed for the release from Rus sia of Polish refugees and failed to withdraw a request for an in vestigation of an alleged massa cre of Polish officers in the Smo lensk area The Polish government issued a statement couched in fairly restrained language but it did not appear to offer any basis on which the U S and Britain could approach Russia with ar guments for resumption of sovietPolish relations While the statement reaffirmed Polish desires for friendship with the Soviets it also reaffirmed Polish territorial demands which Russia has rejected in principle The statement was issued aft er a round of conferences among Polish and British diplomats fol lowed by a Polish cabinet ses sion and a meeting of Prime Min ister Winston Churchill and For eign Secretary Anthony Eden The government appealed in the name of solidarity of the unit ed nations and elementary hu manity for the release from Rus sia of families of Polish asked for a continuation measures for the mass Polish citizens still remaining in Russia The statement said the Polish government principles for which ihe united nations are fighting re main unchanged It rejected a soviet charge that some form ol contact or understanding with the nazi government had been estab lished V The Polish government af firms that its policy aiming at a friendly understanding andl full sovereignty of the Polish republic was and continues to be fully supported by the Po lish nation the statement said It pointed out that the govern ment approached Moscow with a proposal for a common under standing in spite of the manv tragic events which had taken place from the moment of the entry of the soviet armies on the territory of the republic in Sep tember 1939 Having regulated its rela tions with soviet Russia by the agreement of July 30 1941 and by the understanding of Dec 4 1941 the Polish government has scrup ulously discharged its obliga the statement continued It said no traitor or Quisling has sprung from the Polish ranks and all collaborating with the Germans have been scorned Nazi propaganda designed to create mistrust between the allies was denounced Meanwhile dispatches from axis capitals to Bern Switzerland made it clear Wednesday that Germany was overjoyed at the diplomatic breach between Russia and the Polish governmentin cxile and that Rome had joined the chorus of satisfaction over an incident regarded as atriumph for nazi propaganda At Rome the Giornale Dltalia called the RussianPolish split proof of conflict between the al lies even before the end of the war The Berlin correspondent of the Swiss paper Die Tat said a Ger man foreign office commentator declared the incident indicated England and America are doomed to complete impotcncy as regards Russia and asked What can other countries ex pect if today in a question of ex ceptional prestige the allies cant persuade Russia to spare the united nations such a disgrace in the interests of a common alli ance In Moscow soviet Russias official government newspaper Izveslia published an article Wednesday signed by Wanda Vasiltvskaya president of the Union of Polish Patriots in which she declared that the Pol ish ffovernmentinexile with headquarters in London does not represent the Polish people Whom docs the Polish immi grant government represent she asked The Polish people No The people did not choose or ap point and did not give any au thority to this government Poles Ask Reds to Release Refugees HOPE OF SETTLEMENT IN HEAVY FIRE POWER Moving over rough terrain at Washington a new army M12 which combines high fire power with mobility plows through a dense thicket on a hillside smashing trees in its way The M12 mounts a 155 mm gun on an 113 tank chassis It can hurl a 95 pound projectile 10 miles with enough wallop to knock out fortifications or a heavy cruiser Boost Ship Output From 8 to 19 Million Tons in Year Land Cites Great Increase in Talk at U S Chamber Session NEW YORK Rear Ad miral Emory S Land chairman of the United States maritime commission reported Wednesday that nearly 19000000 deadweight tons of dry cargo vessels and tankers will be constructed in American yards this year as compared with more than 8000 000 tons last year In an address prepared for delivery at a general session of the 31st annual meeting of the United States Chamber of Com merce Admiral Land who also is war shipping admin istrator described the record made by American industry during the last two years as the greatest s h i p b H i I d i u g chapter in world history j Admiral Land shared the speakers platform with Chester C Davis administrator of the food production and distribution administration Joseph B East man director of the office of de fense transportation and William L Batt vice chairman of the war production board Tracing the vast expansion alistic coals wisely balanced against each sihcr Asserting that early in the war program many people justifiably criticized because our sights were not high enough Batt said At a later date the sights be came too large as compared with what the country could do and then it was necessary to bring ob jectives closer in line with re sources Otherwise we would have been faced with excess fa cilities for items which could not be completed components which did not match and continuous in terruptions in production Citing examples of activities being conducted under direction of the WPBs conservation divi sion Batt Approximately 8000 tons of zinc per year have been saved in chang ing tops of Mason jars from zinc to steel Industry has been asked to con serve paint brushes since the bristles must be flown out fro China by American pilots An original estimate that 4500 tons of zinc would be used in the new copperless penny has beei cut to 200 tons Approximately 500000 pounds have been v njt 111 i uc nuvc een shipbuilding in the United States the past six months through use of since 1937 Admiral Land said wool felt in the manufacture of employment in American ship washers gaskets and a number o yards producing merchant and similar items naval ships and keeping united nations vessels in repair had passed the 1300000 mark and soon would reach 1500000 Batt told the session that the only way o maintain a balanced schedule and efficient production of war materials is to have re New mixing formulas for rod white and blue lead paints will have up to 50 per cent of the nor mal linseed oil requirements He said that the armed scrvLi had made big contributions towar conserving critical materials by re designing and changing spccifica tions of weapons Canadians an Yanks Attack Kiska Island WASHINGTON fly including Canadians as well as Americans raided Japanese posi ions on Kiska island in the West ern Aleutians 13 times Monday md destroyed a number of build ngs the navy reported Wednes day This was the first time that Ca ladians had been reported in ac ion in the Aleutians campaign ince last September Navy Communique No 35B said South Pacific All dates are ast longitude 1 On April 27th During the early morning i group of Liberator Consolidated 324 heavy bombers attacked Fapunese installations at Kahili md Ballale in the Shortlami island irea and at Vila in the central Solomons Fires were started at Ballale and at Vila Later in the morning five lying fortress Boeing B17 icavy bombers carried out a sec ond attack on Kahili Poor visibili ty prevented observation of re sults North Pacific 2 On April formations of army planes carried out 11 attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska Liberator heavy bomber and Mitchell North American B2a medium bombers Liyhtnin Lockheed P3B and Waihawk Curhss P40 fighters participat ed m these raids Hits were scored in the enemy main camp area on the runway and a number of buildings were destroyed Damage was also inflicted on North Head Canadian pilots flying Warhawks executed two other attacks THerlast previous report of Ca nadian attacks on Japanese in the North Pacific came on Sept 28 when a communique said that on Sept 25 a force of army bombers and pursuit planes accompanied by planes oC the Roy al Canadian Air Force attacked installations and ships at Kiska The destruction of buildings on Kiska was one ot several recent reports of such successful opera tions against enemy structures North Head which was one of the objectives of the Monday raids is a point of land guarding the north ern entrance ot Kiska harbor and presumably is the scene of defen sive installations d MITCHELL SELL VENGEANCE DAY 3 North Iowa Counties Over Top in Second War Loan Campaign Saturday will be Vengeance Day in Mitchell county members of the war finance committee announced Wednesday as part ot their plans for meeting the 5480000 war bond quota in the second war loan ive Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Warmer Wednes day night and much warmer Thursday forenoon IOWA Warmer west and north central portions continued cool elsewhere Wednesday night rising temperature Thursday forenoon MINNESOTA Warmer Wednes day night and Thursday fore noon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 57 Minimum Tuesday night 2 At 8 a m Wednesday 41 Frost was recorded in this sec tion Tuesday night YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation 63 41 08 Some hail S Yorl A TIRS WWUTTLEPrincipal speaker at a war workers bond rally in tn r 1Cf DoollUle wifc of Gon James H Doolittle turned her Li U e finished speaking She is pictured rivet 1 WILL BONDS ON dr Farmers of the county have been asked to meet Iheir rural mail carriers at he mail boxes Saturday to make Iheir extra purchases of war bonds and stumps to avenue the murder of American flyers by Ihc Japa nese Businessmen throughout Ihc county will wear badges pledging themselves to ask every customer to Ituy extra bonds and stamps that day if Another feature of the Mitchell county drive will be the war loan concert Thursday evening at Osagc at which Francis Man merchant marine gunner on U s convoys will be the speaker Man joined the merchant marine attcr army examiners had refused him physical clearance Since then two ships have been sunk from under him Floyd county Wednesday was the third in North Iowa to pass Jts original quota for the April drive according to a report by F C Henemah district chairman Purchases were reported past the 550000 quota and workers were striving to reach the 110 per cent mark before the end of the week Previously over their quotas were Franklin 5380000 and Cerro Gordo SI 350000 Frank lin expects to reach the 110 per cent mark Friday and Ccrro Gordo enmity has passed the mark Three counties have their quotas in sight Mr Hcneman said They are Winnebaso S3GO000 Worth 5240000 and Wright 5520000 County chairmen in each have as sured the district chairman that they will reach their quotas Hancockcounty has reported its quota of S440000 in doubt the chairman said but hope was ex pressed that it could be reached in the time that is left Chairmen of the eight coun ties in the North Iowa district arc Ccrro C Eighmey and Douglas Swaic Floyd W Lakore and E L Wallcser Frank D Inglis and D D Brain well C Armstrong Herbert Ollcnbuig and V D Koons T Aitick and W E Sheldon 1 Thompson and H N Rye J Wardwcll and Os car A Olson R Smithand C J Birdsall AS MINE STRIKE of strikes in the soft coal fields threatens to tie up the nations warvital steel production as miners strike in open rebellion against the war labor boards acceptance of jurisdiction over dead locked contract negotiations between the United Mine Workers and the Appalachian soft coal producers Above miners at California Pa play cards after going on strike Report WLB to Ask F R Aid as Miner Walkout Threatens 61000 Are on Strike Total May Increase to 450000 by Saturday WIN 3 FIERCELY DEFENDED KEY POSTS IN DRIVE Other Allied Forces Hammer at Weakening Axis Points in Tunisia BULLETIN WITH BRITISH FIRST AIIMY NEAR MEDJEZEL BAB Delayed 8 p m April 27 soumiers Tues day night crossed and cut the road between Ihc key junction of Pont Du Fans on the south western front and Enfidaville on the coast threatening the rear of German forces facing the British eighth army By WILLIAM B KING ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA troops stormed three fiercely de fended hills straddling Ihc road to Matcur and Bizerte and the British first army battled for a commanding height nt Medjerda village 21 miles northwest ot Tunis it was announced at allied headquarters Wednesday as al lied forces hammered against the tenaciously defended but weaken ing axis bridgehead in Tunisia WASHINGTON war labor board was reported Wed nesday to have virtually decided to ask President Roosevelt to in tervene immediately in the threatened walkout ot bi tuminous coal miners The number of miners al ready on strike jumped to more than Bl000 as the board con sidered the case during a two ami onehalf hour morning ses sion niid there were increasing indications that the culire 450 UOO would iuit on Saturday it A special threeman factfind ing panel appointed by the WLB meanwhile met with northern and southern bituminous mine opera tors As had been expected no one appeared on behalf ot the United Mine Workers or its presi dent John L Lewis Board members told the United Press thrl prompt action by Mr Roosevelt will be essential if the rapidlyspreading strikes are to be curbed They their present Gets Life Sentence 8 Hours After Admitting Slaying Bank Cashier S H A W A N O Wis brief crime foray of Rcinhold Flesserl 25 year old Shawano farm hand came to a speeclv end Tuesday when he was sentenced to life imprisonment eight hours after he admitted slaying the cashier of a bank which he at tempted to rob Wednesday he was to enter Waupun slate prison to begin serving his sentence Preceding Desserts sentence on his plea of guilty to a first degree charge ot murder was a scries of fast moving events including the attempted bank robbery slaying of the cashier and the subsequent capture of the youth by a posse Circuit Judge Arold Murphy imposed the life sentence Tuesday night after District Attorney L J Brunner said Flessert had admit ted that eight hours earlier he had attempted to rob the bank ot Birnamwood Wis and then shot and killed Cashier John Pcrrar 1568 SHIFT JOBS DES MOINES iP George Moore director of the local office service said Tuesday 1500 DCS Moines men who had been in jobs not fssontial to the war effort have shifted to war industries in the last three months in the face of orders to get such essential employment or be inducted plans do not contemplate any spe cific recommendations to the president Tiie board arranged to recon vene at p m EWT to con sider a statement of the case pre pared by Chairman William H Davis for presentation to the pres ident The request for presiden tial action probably will be routed to Mr Roosevelt through Eco nomic Stabilization Director James F Byrnes Observers believe Mr Koosc vcll iniKhl call on Lewis to cud the current walkouts which arc soiujt into effect in advance of the Friday midnight dead line for a new contract between the operators ami the XiMW and then to agree to a further extension of the present truce while WLB considers Ihc merits of the case if ST 3t If that should fail Mr Roose velt presumably would appeal to the miners to disregard Lewis and go back to work under army protection if necessary The numbrc of wildcat stop pages was growing rapidly Early Wednesday morning the number of men known to be out was II 000 Morris L Cooke chairman of the special panel told reporters at the close of its morning session that the panel would meet again with operators Wednesday after noon He refused however to say whether the meetings would con U S Steel corporation wjuncd that a complete shutdown of the bituminous mines would close Americas warvital steel industry within two weeks and cause a 20 per cent cut in operations im mediately lie said steel com panies have a very small reserve of coal and coke because they are Operating atClose to 100 per cent of capacity Mine operators estimated that production already had decreased well over 100000 tons daily be cause of the gunjumping walk outs tinuc if spread the gunjumping strikes The full board apparently found there was some basis to a report The British first and eighth armies the second U S army corps and he French made steady progress an allied communique said but it was by dint of hardest fighting espe cially in the MedjezElBab sec tor where allied attacks were followed by enemy counterat tacks all day Tuesday The Americans under Ii Gen George S Pntlon cleaned Col Gen Jurgen Von Arnims north ern Germans and Italians out ot Diebel Dartlyss and occupied im portant high ground Another contingent pushing to ward Jcfna station 28 miles southwest of LSixcrte swept the enemy off Djcbcl El Azzog north of Jcfna and also took Djebct El Ajrcd just to the southwest of the station These two knobs command much of the approach to Matcur the important axis crossroads 1C miles to the east oE Jcfna The British lirst army under Lt Gen K A N Anderson at tacked Djebcl Bou Auokaz 12 miles northeast of MedjczElBab and against savage fighting by the German defenders reached to within 400 yards ot the crest Thirty or 40 prisoners were cap tured at this point which com mands a great section o the Med jerda valley and is only 21 miles in direct line from Tunis Twelve miles cast ot Medjcz ElBab the first army was engag ing in a second thrust directly to ward Tunis along the Massicaull road south of Tcbourba and a famous British regiment attacked a feature of the terrain known as si abballah and captured it in a bloody action Hut typical of the Germans tenacious nflnrl to hold cvery foot of their mountain rim they counterattacked i m m c d i alely with tanks and infantry and drove the British from the crest In the area east of Goubcllat where armored clashes have been occurring almost daily since the start of the allied offensive and where 80 enemy tanks have been reported destroyed the enemy continued to defend every foot ol territory The British however had smashed to within four miles of the Pont Du Fahs supply road leading from Tunis Pont Du Fahs was threatened with encirclement by these British armored columns from the north west and by French forces which had advanced 15 miles in three days from the southwest and were now pounding hard at the out skirls By the summer of 1912 the French matheimct division had CITES INCREASE IN AVIATION GAS Ickes Lists Obstacles Overcome by Industry WASHINGTON Administrator Ickes told the Tru man committee Wednesday there has been a month to month in crease in 100octanc gasoline pix duclivc capacity ever since Pearl Harbor in the face of continuing and discouraging obstacles He predicted that by July obstacles or no will he producing more fuel every day than the best esti mators had believed u year ago that we should need by or by next with out the help with construction materials we had to have to carry out our program Ickcs described as the last wallop to the gasoline program WPB Chairman Donald M Nel sons January order to complete 55 per cent of the buna S rub ber program at the expense of high octane gasoline The committee is inquiring inlu a dispute involving Ickes Under secretary of War Patterson and Rubber Director Jcffcrs over pri orities granted the rubber pro gram Ickes listing other wallops he said the aviation gasoline program had suffered said Vic did not receive any steel for new plants until March 1912 and then it was delivered in a harumscarum manner without regard lo the needs or relative urgencies of the separate projects In the then authorities actually voted the aircraft production program and certain other military programs as of higher urgency than the program to produce fuel for com bat planes that Lewis plans to order all his j In the early fall of 1942 we men not to work in the mines after Friday midnight YVIB Vice Chairman George Taylor re vealed Tuesday night that the board had heard such completed occupation of the hills in the northern part of the grand dorsal and pushed on out into the Pont Du Fahs plain which leads to Tunis 34 miles distant a mili tary spokesman said However this force was meeting but he came a report did not say whence it The prospects of a general walk out were supported however by Levels statements in New York and the number of miners who had already walked out in resent ment over delayed settlement of their S2aday wage increase and other demands The number on strike had jumped by at least 12000 in the last few hours Irving S Olds chairman ot the endured more than a month in machinegun and artillery fire which all rubber projects were I The advance of Gen Sir Ber rated higher than all 100octanc plants While in December 1942 we finally attained the mandatory scheduling of parts for certain plants the directive then issued had to be shared with the rubber program 1OH ANS ARE PRISONERS SIBLEY of Staff Sgt Ivan L Sanders 2G Sibley and Sgt Merrill Devrics 21 of Ashton have received word that the soldiers are prisoners of Ger many nard L Montgomerys eighth army on the southern flank was most marked in the area oE Dejcbel Mcdekcr on his left But the Germans were using a liberal sprinkling of mines and machinegunners who were said to be instructed o fight until killed in a murderous defense in advantageous Terrain On the extreme north oilier French forces also continued to make steady though unspectacular progress along the Mediterranean V   

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