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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 27, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 27, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR FULL SHARE OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES 0 E 3 0 I THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COFV MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY APRIL 27 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 171 ALLIES WITHIN 23 MILES OF TUNIS U S Britain Try to Patch RussPole Split POLISH CHIEFS MAY APPEAL TO FRCHURHCILL Moscow Wants Purge of AntiSoviet Elements in Polish Exile Rule LONDON Polish gov ernment in exile was reported re liably Tuesday to be considering an appeal to President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill to intervene in the crisis precipitated by Russias suspension of diplomatic relations with the Poles American and British authori ties already had begun discus sions on means of restoring the relations between he soviet and exiled Polish governments A Moscow dispatch said however that only a purge of Polish anti soviet elements would satisfy Moscow Gen Sikorski the Polish premier conferred with Churchill and Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden later in the day A Polish spokesman said that no statement on the Polish govern ments attitude toward Russias note would be issued Tuesday A scheduled press conference was canceled However a statement by the government was expected Wednesday Sikorski was reported reliably to have conferred with Alexander BogomolovV Russian ambassador to the exiled governments here The premier was understood to have denied charges that the Rus sians were not informed of thfi alf egeddeath ot10000 Poles iff the Smoieiisk area Kesponsiblc sources said Si horski told Boffomolov that he personally called the matter to the attention of Premier Josef Stalin when he visited Moscow American Ambassador John G Winant conferred with Eden a few hours before the foreign secre tarys scheduled meeting with Si korski RUSSIA MAY RECOGNIZE NEW POLISH REGIME WASHINGTON diplo matic monkey wrench was tossed into the machinery for making postwar planning conferences Tuesday by Russias abrupt sev erance of relations with the Pol ish government in exile The question now is Who speaks for prostrate Poland Until that is settled some dip lomatic observers here believe that the task of arranging for united nations parleys has been immeasurably complicated for a soviet government which has de nounced the Polish government in London as in contact and ac cord with the enemy cannot very well sit at the same conference table with lhat government In Polish circles here here was fear the answer would be soviet recognition of a new pro visional Polish regime with headquarters in Moscow As early as March 8 last there appeared in Moscow a new Po lish language newspaper Free Poland and openly hostile o the Polish government in exile in London Should a Free Polish regime with headquarters in Moscow be recognized by the soviet govern ment there would be in effect two governments in exile both claiming the right to speak for Poland but neither actually func tioning in Poland ON SECOND guerillas who in effect have maintained a second front ever since the fall of their government have kept thousands of German troops busy who otherwise could have been used against the other allies Some nazis are pictured above in a snowcovered trench somewhere in Jugoslavia as they fought a battlewith the guerillas in the mountains The photo in the States through a neutral HEAVY ASSAULT ON DUISBURG IS MADE BY RAF 1500 Tons of Bombs Fall on Important German Industrial City LONDON great force of British fourengincd bombers hammered the river port and steel city of Duisburg Monday night with upwards of 1500 tons of bombs in one of the heaviest raids of the war on Germany Wellinformed sources said the raid was comparable in weight to the 1000plane raid of last May 30 on Cologne when 1500 tons of bombs were dropped Though fewer planes participated in Mon day nights assault almost all were fourengined giants The huge cargoes of ranging from fourton super block busters to twopound in off fierce fires and big explosions that sent smoke billowing up to near ly 10000 feet over Duisburff Monday night the ministry said A British broadcast heard by the United Press in New York said the raid was the severest ever made on Germany Seventeen planes were lost in the raid the third on Germany in less than12 hours Preliminary reports indicate that the bombing was highly con centrated the air ministry said Roaring back into action after a fivenight weatheierilorcedlull Nazis Worst Looters in All History WASHINGTON ff German looting ot occupied Europe was ctured by the board of economic arfare Tuesday as surpassing and ruthlessness 1 previous conquests of history The board estimated Germany id plundered 536000000000 by ic end of 1941 and the rate since len is accelerating into tens of millions of dollars a year 11 dded Not only has wealth accu mulated over centuries been carried back to Germany but he industries natural re sources und labor power of the occupied countries arc under absolute German domination OFF ON ROUTINE Disbrow of Schc nectady N Y boards her plane for a routine flight at Avenger field Sweetwater Tex where girls ire in train ing to become ferrying pilots for the army air force in noncombatant service within the United States On the ground are Catherine llouser left of Canton Ohio and Violet Wieizbibicki of Flint Mich source Allies Hold Hilltops Near Mubo Airfield in New Guinea Advance of Ground Forces Is Revealed Toward Salamaua Base Accidents Take 10 Times as Many U S Lives as Battlefronts CHICAGO on the home front have taken ten times as many lives as have been lost on the American battlefronts since Peart Harbor the National Safety Council reported Tuesday The council said that a total of 128000 persons workers and others had been killed in acci dents since the start of the war as compared to 12123 deaths in the armed services This huge waste of manpower on the home front is more alarm ing than ever before in view of the fact that the nation is taking increasingly drastic steps to mo bilize every available ounce of manpower to insure victory said Ned H Dearborn executive vice president of the council ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN AUSTRALIA and American troops now hold hill tops overlooking the village and airfield of Mubo New Guinea which is less than 15 miles south of the important Japanese base of Salamaua This was disclosed Tuesday in an elaboration at General Douglas MacArthurs headquarters of a onesentence account in the noon communique Mubo Our attack planes bombed and strafed enemy posi tions in support of our ground troops It was pointed out that these planes Bostons twice raided the enemy Monday ahead of ridge positions held by the al lies mostly Australians and that their fire was directed par ticularly at a group of Japanese entrenched on a hill only a mile and a quarter northeast of Mubo Since organized Japanese re sistance ceased last Jan 23 on the Papuan peninsula nt a point roughly 150 miles below Sala maua information has been meager concerning exact positions of the allies on the north coastal approaches to the Huon gulf Pa trols have moved near to Sala maua one annihilating an enemy outpost of 20 men on April 16 within six airline miles of that base But the last skirmishing ot note occurred early in February near Wau roughly 30 miles south west of Salamaua during which the Japanese lost 1000 men At that time the enemy troops were reported fleeing in the direction of Mubo Tuesday it was pointed out the allies now hold the rail between that village and Wau which has an airfield Allied planes almost daily make from 10 to 20 low strafinr sweeps over Japanese positions below Salamaua These raids report edly have left the enemy poorly fed and badly in need of sup plies Menaced Salamaua is so highly regarded by the enemy that they have tried frantically to run the MacArthur aerial blockade ant reenforce it First they tried the direct sea lane route but destruc tion of a 22ship convoy in the Bismarck sea in March discour aged that Then hey resorted I supplyladen submarines One wa surprised and sunk March 1 while unloading at Lac More re ently the enemy lias endeavored o ship supplies far up the New Guinea coast for overland trans portation prompting MacArthurs airmen to bomb coastal roads Bad flying weather limited aerial action elsewhere than the Mubo sector to light on asmatn Arawc and Ubili New Britain laps m Relocation enters Not Pampered and Not Mistreated LOS ANGELES UR Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt said Monday night she has conducted a person al investigation and found that Japanese in relocation centers are their situation as a she said She visited the camp where about way to the Lancasters and Haiifaxes bombarded docks ware houses steel mills and coke ovens in one of the most important in dustrial cities in Germany Duisburg is the largest inland port in Europe and is situated on a canal linking the Ruhr and the Rhine Monday nights raid was the 59th of the Avar on the port which last was attacked the night of April 9 Although the fourengincd bombers had not been in action since the triple raid on Berlin Stettin and Rostock the night of April 20 swift British mosquito light bombers attacked n railway center in northwest Germany and another in the Rhincland without loss Monday evening A third railway center in France near the river Loire also was at tacked without loss by mosquitos during the evening The night assault on Duisburg and the three attacks on railway centers all tied in with the cur rent British offensive against Ger man communications in the reich and occupied countries Intruder patrols have been striking almost nightly and daily at trains in nd shipping in the Eng More Than 50 Mines Shut Down as Coal Strike Spreads WLB Appeals to Mens Gila 15000 Ariz Japa nese evacuated from the west coast put in long hours of work she saidbut the type of work is a military secret Hundreds of letters complaining ithat Japanese were getting pre crrcd treatment prompted her in pection she said Since she felt tie Gila project was typical she vill not visit others Vlan Goes Berserk Gils Daughter Wounds Self and 2 Others BAY CITY Mich father of six children going beserk car y Tuesday morning in his bar ricaded home shot and killed a 10 year old daughter and critical y wounded himself and two other girls A fourth daughter also was shot police fired ear gas into Lhe home after vain efforts to calm the man Cecil J Lisk 44 turned a shotgun on his daugh ters in an upstairs bedroom and then dashed into the basement and shot himself in the head Genevieve 10 died shortly aft er being brought to Mercy hos pital Physicians held little hope for Kathleen 2 and Vivian 5 or for the father The fourth daugh ter Bernice 8 was believed not seriously wounded The shootings took place at 3 a m after police neighbors and a son ofLisk Cecil J Jr 17 had tried without avail to compose the father subsequent to a quarrel his wife Josephine 43 and his threats to kill everybody Patrolmen Roy Robb said Report Allied Sea Air Movements at Gibraltar By UNITED PRESS A Vichy broadcast was quoted by the British radio Tuesday as saying that a major movement of allied sea and air forces1 was under way at Gibraltar Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Cooler with frost Tuesday night lowest tempera ture 33 continued cool Wednes day forenoon IOWA Considerably cooler Tues day night and Wednesday fore noon light frost in north por tion Tuesday night and in scat tered low places in central por tion fresh to moderately strong winds Tuesday afternoon di minishing early Tuesday night MINNESOTA Cooler south and west portions Tuesday night with light to heavy frost fresl to moderately strong winds south and central portion diminishing rapidly early Tuesday flight Continued cool Wednesday fore noon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 58 Minimum Monday night 43 At 8 a m Tuesday 47 Rain 10 inch YEAR AGO Maximum 70 Minimum 52 Precipitation Trace Patriotism Not to Walk Away From Jobs WASHINGTON fP M ore than 60 mines were shut down Tuesday in the spread of a strike which held the possibility of halt ing production of soft coal by Saturday More than 26000 of an esti mated total of 450000 soft coal miners were reported to have left their work by midday The war labor board appealed lo the miners patriotism not to walk out sayinjr in messages to President John 1 Lewis of the united mine workers and oilier UMW leaders that a nation at war needs uninterrupted pro duction V However in Pennsylvania 2ti mines were shut down with 14700 men idle The production loss there thus increased to more than 88000 tons a day on the basis of six tons a man About 4000 men were idle in Kentucky and 7500 in Alabama In Ohio a UMW district president said if there is not a contract be tween operators and the union by Friday there wont be any coal miners go into coal mines Satur day UMW district leaders met in New York for a policy meeting but Lewis still was silenl He has flatly opposed the turning over of the wage dispute between miners and the operators of the WLB Although UMW spokesmen said no strikes had been au thorized they pointed out that Lewis had not forbidden them and the number of idle miners Tvas estimated at more than 13 000 in the Pittsburgh and Bir mingham areas In addition n New York source losc to the UMW officials sale hundreds of telegrams were arriv ng at UMW headquarters urgin he unions negotiators to stanc irm and informing them tha miners were ready to strike at moments notice Most of the Pitlsbiirgh and Bir mingham operations are captivi mines whose total output is usci jy the steel companies that owi them At least two commercial mines in Pennsylvania howcvci were hit by walkouts and several thousand southeastern Kentucky coal miners quit work while else where in the state those who con tion of the issues Wednesday will be headed by Morris Llewellyn Coolcc Philadelphia engineer who the first administrator of the rural electrification program as the publics representative Cooke is the panel chairman Representing labor js David B Robertson president of the Broth erhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen The employer representative is Walter White assistant to the chairman of the business advisory council of the commerce department The WLBs initial telegram to Lewis Secretary Treasurer jThomas Kennedy and presidents of the districts where stoppages have occurred appealed lo the workers patriotism It made no reference to the boards policy of suspending consideration of the merits of a dispute while a strike is in progress Us reports the board said show lat armaments and other mili iry equipment have been taken rom all the vanquished armies of Europe Thousands of machines have een dismounted and moved to Germany with laboratory and cientific equipment from the ireatest institutes in Europe the oard reported Horses cattle heep pigs and fats have been public galleries and private collections stripped of art bjccts and office furniture park benches and garden tools taken Describing Poland as the out standing example of confiscation of public property the board es timated the loot there at 000000 Military equipment from Aus tria and CzcchoSlovakiu was traded to southeastern Europe an countries for foodstuffs and raw materials the report said but was recovered later when Germany invaded those coun tries Considerable quantities of rel aiively obsolete equipment wer sold to Japan the board addcc In trading with occupied coun tries Germany takes as much a she can get and defers payinen whenever possible the boaiv explained Where Ihc occupatioi costs are sufficiently high to example France and Norvva clearing debts arc wiped out b the credit balances at the disposu of Germany in other cases th nazis simply regard this mountin debt as longterm inlerestfrc loans from the creditor coun tries AXIS WESTERN HILL BARRIERS ARE CRUMBLING Allies on Threshold of Tunis Plain Nazis Abandon Strong Points By ROGEK GREENE Associated Tress War Editor Allied nnnics drove within 23 miles of both Tunis and Bixerte in the climatic battle of Tunisia Tuesday und the enemys whole western mountain barricr ap peared to be crumbling as the Germans abandoned vital defen sible high around without a fight For the first time since the late 142 setbacks the allies once orewere on the threshold of the unis plain W arew Jap Militarists Ambitious to Make nvasion of U S tinuecl work were described by both operators and union leaders as Bituminous operators in Ala bama Illinois and Indiana hare received notice that the miners will not work after midnight Friday These states do not come under the Appalachian agree ment now in dispute before the WLB bat this dispute is the key to the situation generally The board announced that a panel which is to begin considers NAZIS ADMIT RUSSIAN GAINS Reds Win Control of All of Lake Ilmen By THE ASSOCIATED PKESS A Berlin broadcast acknowl edges Tuesday that Marshal Sem eon Timoshcnkos ret armies liac won control of nl Lake Ilmen 101 miles south of Leningrad and strongly indicated that sovie troops had captured the key Ger man base at Novgorod The broadcast said a map pub lished in Adolf Hitlers news paper showed that Novgorod wa exactly in front of the currcn German line conceding even greater nazi set backs than claimed by the Rus sians the Germans also admittc that the front touches the tow of Taganrog 42 miles west o Rostov on the sea of Azov an said the line in the Caucasus ran near the Black sea naval base at Novorossisk and the town of Temryuk on the Taman peninsula which juts out into the Kerch si rail Loss ot Temryuk would sharply threaten to cut off the German escape route across Kerch strait to the Crimea In other details the Hitler war map closely corresponded with a soviet map published April 4 Meanwhile soviet headquarters declared lhat the red armies of the north killed 800 Germans in fight ing below Leningrad where the nazis made a sudden attack SCHENECTADY N Y apans militarists nurse an over vhelming ambition to invade and onquer the United States Joseph C Grew former ambassador to Tokio declared Monday They must be crushed lie said n n prepared address at Union ollcges commencement not only n have the United States but to rec the Inpancse people from Bondage Grew a special assistant to Sec clary of State Hull praised the contribution of local Americans of Japanese origin1 Union college conferred honor Try degrees upon 12 persons in cluding Grew In the north French troous cached a point six miles west of Lake Achkel dispatches said and hardhitting American iloughboys were also racing to ward the lake on Ihc road to Matcur 18 miles southwest of the big axisheld Bizcrtc naval base American infantry attacked Djebcl El Azzog 10 miles west of latur and in the area west of akc Achkel Tuesday but pulled ack under heavy counterfire he enemys position is north of trongly fortified Jcfna South of Jcfna the Americans uecccded however in occupying El Ajred Major allied gains in at least four sections were announced in i communique from Gen Dwight D Eisenhowers headquarters Three main gateways to the TunisBizcrle zone Tebourbii MateurjindPontDu Fahsrtwcre either under direct assault or im minently threatened and field re ports said the axis forces were in danger of being split into two In the skies allied warplancs flew more than 1000 sorties in an offensive of increasing inten sity hammering axis troops air dromes and supply lines in the enemys dwindling coastal corri dor The Americans were last re ported attacking on a line three miles cast of Siiii XSir and about 10 miles southwest of Matcur The battle continued Monday with unabated ferocity the allied xvar bulletin said On the 1st army front ar mored fighting continues in the sector southeast of McdjczEtBab and our troops here haxc again made some progress againsl des perate opposition from the ene my Field dispatches said ColGen Jurgcn Von Arnims beleaguered armies were beginning to ns of exhaustion yielding key points they might have held had they possessed reserves In the Tunisian campaign al lied headquarters said British 1st army troops had now cleared Stop Hill the Verdunlike German fortress and captured an important feature north of Mcd 14 miles scniUuvcsi of Tunis tlie capital Another axis prisoners fell IOWAN IN LIST WASHINGTON navy announced Tuesday 11 casualties in navy forces including Henry Lcc Thompson dead His wife was given as Mrs Mcrelc Ethel Thomp son of Chariton Iowa ADVANCE FN TUNISIA Arrows indicate direction of allied advances in Tunisia where American British and French troops were straining the HOmile axis line brok en   

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