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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 24, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 24, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             DEPARTMENT HISTOSV AN CUMr OF ARCHIVES HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR FULL SHARE THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AOT OJgMtt TOLl LEASED WIRES CITY IOWA SATURDAY APRIL 24 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE HOME EDITION UUJJJ NO 169 ROLL BACK AXIS IN TUNISIA CORNER Captured Papers Rommel Has Left Africa M i DEMAND LEWIS END STRIKE IN NEWARK PLANT Roosevelt Order in Celanese Firm Hints Strong Coal Stand Think Slaying Traceable to Black Market LOS ANGELES Police be lieved Saturday that Johnny Tu disco 33 smalltime racketeer found strangled in his automobile was the nations first black market murder victim Tudiscos body was found in his expensive coupe late Tuesday His brother Angelo turned over to the homicide squad Friday 1039 stolen Roose action in the event of a soft coal strike Saturday ordered John L Lewis to end a 12 day old walkout by the United Mine Workers at the An immediate series of arrests jailed a halfdozen service station Pects a Newark N J plant of the Celan ese Corp of America The presidents order inieren tially threatened military occupaemmen ons an S940 in cash tion of the plant unless the UMW CaPlVemon E Rasmussen head obeys his ultimatum by noon Monof the omicide detail said Tu day disco liad been peddling the ga day The war labor board meantime ordered the mine workers and bituminous coal operators to continue the uninterrupted pro duction of coal until their dis pute has been determined with the provision that any wage ad justments snail be applied retro active from March 31 IIiJU eun maciei insiae gasoline This followed a 4i minute board cans in the garage He did not meeting which Lewis refused to attend although he had been in structed to do so Leaders of both the northern and southern oper ators were on hand The miners and operators now are operating under a 30day truce whichexpires Although the Celanese strike is not directly connected with the coal deadlock the same union and the same defiant attitude toward the war labor board are involved The UMW had rejected or ders that production at the Celan ese was manufactur ing plastic materials for the armed resumed at once The white house said that Mr Roosevelt acting on unanimous recommendation of the WLB or dered Lewis and four other of ficials of the UMW whose catch all district 50 represents the strik ing Celanese workers o cease picketing the plant and to return to work noon Monday In the menacing coal dispute the war labor board also an nounced it would appoint a threeman panel to meet with the parties next Wednesday and make recommendations to the board fallowing hearings and discussion Questions immedi ately arose as to whether the UMW would snub this meeting as it did Saturday WLB Chairman William H Da vis emphasized that wage adjust ments if any must be made in ac cordance with the stabilization act of Oct 2 1342 and President Roosevelts two antiinflation or ders Davis fold reporters that the board will not consider the case if Lewis carries out a strike after the 30day truce expires April 30 Meanwhile several thousand miners in Pennsylvania and Ala bama went on strike They were described as resentful over devel opments in the contract negotia About 3000 men left five steel company coal mines in Pennsyl vania and in Aiahama approxi mately 7000 miners of the Tennes see coal iron and railroad com pany did not report to work Sat urday Davis disclosed that a telegram has been sent to Lewis in tccw York announceing tile WLB order Davis said in accordance with board custom it will give the UMW an opportunity to propose three names one of which She board will select as the labor member of the panel However Davis added the union will not be allowed to recommend one of its own members to hear the case Announcement that the panel will meet Wednesday was re garded as a concession lo Lewis ou acKn who Friday scheduled a meeting of the order next Tuesday of the UMWs inter national policy committee in New tended Saturdays hearing which concerned the procedure to be followed in settling the dispute he would have protested his in ability to make any decision prior lo Tuesdays meeting STRIKERS CONTINUE TO PICKET PLANT NEWARK N J at the Celanese corporation of Americas big plastics plant here Jttllulla ulal u was continued picketing Saturday after which could not be operators and miscellaneous sus suspicion of murder Seizure of Tudiscos safety de posit box yielded 511400 in gov bonds and S2940 in cash tickets part of 4200000 gallons worth stolen from a Hollywood ra tion board March 23 Federal agents entered the case with discovery of the stolen books and disclosed that four suspects were in custody in connection with the ration board burglary They will face a federal grand jury Wednesday Tudiscos brother said the books had been hidden inside gasoline know how long they had been there BLAST BURNS CHARLES CITYAN Kerosene Poured on Fire Causes Explosion CHARLES Mar ker 39 was in a serious condition Saturday at the Cedar Valley hos pital from burns suffered when he poured kerosene on the fire in the kitchen stove at his home 807 Howard street early Saturday morning Marker an employe at the Oliver Farm Equipment com pany is married and is the father of seven children No fire resulted but the explosion blew out a win dow in the kitchen Young Man Admits He Couldnt Resist Getting Kisses From 2 Girls DENVER Two girls skipped across the street to police youth they com grabbed them and headquarters A strange plained had kissed them Police Capt E S Davis singled out a 17 year old who wiped sheepishly at lipstick smudges on Ins face and confessed It was such a beautiful day and all I just couldnt resist BACK IN PRISON SAVANNAH Ga Tunier notorious Georgia escape artist who with two other men led a wholesale break from Tattnall state prison last Friday was back behind bars Saturday while police combed this city for two compan ions who fled when captured Friday night their immediate return to work The president nave the strik ers members of district 50 United Mine Workers of America until Monday to com ply Noncompliance would briny government interventionhe warned Weve just said in acknowledging they knev the of Motorists toBe Eligible for Grade I Tires Stop Manufacture of Victory Tires From Reclaimed Rubber WASHINGTON if Millions of motorists will become eligible for top grade tires May 1 an of fice of price administration an nouncement disclosed Saturday coincident with the news that manufacture of victory tires from reclaimed rubber has been stopped The OPA statement said every motorist with gasoline rations for more than 240 miles a month may buy grade I tires a week from Sat urday All those in the eastern seaboard area where rations have been thus be eligible whereas previously a mileage ration of 560amonth had been required for the top tires and those with 240to560 mileage ra tions got grade IIs V Simultaneously rubber di rector William letters office confirmed that production of the victory tires was halted March 31 although no previous an nouncement was made News of the action came just as Jcffers was in the midst of a squabble with military officials over whether the synthetic rubber program has retarded production of aviation gasoline I information from Jeffcrs that supplies of grade II tires arc inadequate to meet lively more grade T tires arc avail President Roosevelt had ordered ablc in relation to those eligible innir n for them To adjust the situation the new ruling classes grade I and grade It tires together in the rubber grouping The grade II class has included prePearl Harbor tires of lower quality factory sec damaged new tires and the line Grade I tires were standardquality prewar casings Under this arrangement any any no comment to make motorist who drives more than strike headquarters 24 miles a month will be able to If the army or navy enter inlolwants pay take his choice of that entire depending on the price he local the matter Howard Giii union president had said Fridav we will gladly work for them but not for the Celanese com pany Police maintained a heavy guard outside the plant Satur day Only disorder of the morning was when police took into custody a district 50 organizer who they said insisted on taking pictures outside the plant over police ob jections that it was a war factory Motorists who drive less than Z4D miles a month must remain content with retreads and re caps but halt of the Victory tire production is expected lo aid them A spokesman in Jef fers office said the reclaimed rubber will be diverted into re caps or retreads where he said it will fa about two and one half times as far Only about 1000000 or the low mileage Victory casings were for it Officials said the tires per formance didnt measure up to expectations adding it was main ly because motorists neglected to heed instructions for their care slowing for curves driving under 35 making frequent inspections They looked as good as natural rubber and drivers tended to take them at face value they said Mounting demands for recap ping services led to the decision this would be the more economi cal use of the reclaimed rubber particularly since it had been found impossible to expand the capacity of reclaiming plants as rapidly as had been hoped he Jeffers spokesman said CONVOYS REACH MALTA TRIPOLI Vital Supplies War Maierials Are Carried By PAUL KEKX LEE VALLETTA Malta portant convoys have reached Malta and Tripoli bearing vital supplies and war materials for allied forces The vessels including deeply laden American liberty ships traversed the Mediterranean un der a powerful royal navy escort and under constant air protection from the coast of North Africa One convoy threaded its wnv into Tripoli harbor past the wreckage of sixis shipping to carry munitions for Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys British 8lh army The other in which I traveled brought to Malta the sinews with which this battered island now is striking out at the foewith in creasing vigor PURSE IS SNATCHED LOS ANGELES Lor raine King was pitting beside an open streetcar window she said when a pickup truck drove up alongside n youth standing in it reached through the window seized her purse containing S65 and hastily drew away News for Those in Service Families and friends oE men and women in service should notoverlook the weekly GlobeGazette diary on Page 8 Clip it out and mail it to them ns an extra letter from home If they ore outside the United Stales send it airmail for nn early delivery BANKS OPEN TO SELL BONOS Will iVIake Sales From 7 to 9 p m Saturday Bunks of Ccrro Gordo county will be open from 7 to 9 oclock Saturday evening as a special fea ture of the second war loan drive it was announced by the wnr fi nance committee The Ccrro Gordo county has been increased 5135000 and the war finance committee ha guaranteed to get this amount to avenge the Yankee flyers mur dered at Tokio u spokesman said Saturday We would like to advise the state administrator Monday that Ccrro Gordo county is over the top This can be done only every resident of the every man woman and child every farmer laborer and busi down deep and in vests his last extra dime Do it to The banks which will be opci Sulnrday include the Clear Lake Bank and Trust company the Farmers Savings bank of Rock Falls the First State bank ol Thornton the Mcscrvey branch of the Thornton State bank the Plymouth branch of ihe Manlv State bank the first Nutionnl bank of Mason City the United Home Bank and Trust company of Mason City and the Ventura State bank Bond headquarters in the old Northwest Savings bank will close at 5 p m Saturday as usual but will also be open from 7 to 9 in the evening WARNS OF JAP AIR BASES ON AUSTRALIA ARC Forde Says Nipponese Have Established Bases for 2000 Aircraft GENERAL MacARTHURS HEADQUARTERS Australia UPI Japanese have developed bases for 2000 planes in ihe island arc above Australia and allied troops in the western part of the country are set to meet any enemy invasion attempt Army Minister 1 1 Fovdc announced Saturday His statement came as a com munique reported the probable sinking of an 8000 ton enemy freighter escorted by three de stroyers off Kavieng New Ire land and the penetration by allied ground patrols to within seven miles of Salamaua New Guinea to wipe out a Japanese garrison of 20 men We must assume an attack against northeast or northwest Australia is a distinct possibility anil must plan accordingly Forde said at Sydney after re turning from a tour oC western Australia Noting the regularly reported Japanese reinforcing of their aoOmile arc of bases north of Australia Forde said it was cer tain the enemy wouldnt stay put The Japanese have prepared landing strips sufficient for 2000 planes on the islands north of Australia where it is believed they have concentrated 200000 men he sntd Western Australia Iroops are as well trained as others in the coun try he added and are ready tor the Japanese if they Iry a landing under n cloud of air strength anywhere on the western coast Forde conferred at length with Sir Owen Dixon Aus tralian minister to the United Stales on the war in the south west Pacific After the talk Forde expressed increasing confidence rccardinjr the future but called for a continued all out effort without which our chances for success would be ffrcatly minimized Gen Douglas MatArthurs com munique said a heavy bomber scored a direct hit on a freighter off Kavieng The plane was on reconnaissance and spotted the vessel and Its escort The bomb hit started a fire billowing smoke 3000 feet into the air and the ship was believed to hnve been left sinking Weather Report FORECAST MASON Saturday afternoon not much change in temperature Siilurday night showers and thunderstorms and cooler Sunday forenoon strong winds IOWA Cooler in north ami west portions Saturday night and southeast portion Sunday fore noon scattered thundershowers Saturday afternoon and in ex treme east portion Saturday night fresh to strong winds MINNESOTA Cooler south and much cooler north portions Sat urday night and Sunday fore noon Scattered showers north and east central portions Satur day night strong winds IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 71 Minimum Kriday night 39 At 8 a m Saturday 19 YEAR AGO Maximum 7f Minimum 41 Von Arnim Is Now Chief of Axis Forces ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN AFRICA Sir Harold Alexanders headquarters mounced Saturday that a cap ired document indicated that Marshal Erwin Rommel the Ger man commander in Tunisia had left Africa A statement issued by the heucl quarters of the 18th army group laid A document dated March 13 captured by the first limy was signed by Col Gen Jur en von Arnim as general officer ommander in chief and not by Rommel whose present where abouts and new appointment if my are unknown Rommel last was known to have been in Africa during the Kas crinc pass fighting in February ivhcn captured letters mentioned him Recent reports have said vari ously that Rommel had been re called to take charge of the de fense of Italy Sardinia and Sicily because the German high com mand was convinced that Africa was lost that he was in disgrace with Hitler and removed that ho was seriously ill with malaria and recuperating in Germany NAZIS SLACKEN COUNTER DRIVES Lose Thousands of Men in Kuban Region MOSCOW furious German counterattacks in thr Kuban region of ihe Caucasus which in the last few days had approached the intensity of an offensive slackened significantly Saturday as the Germans counted several thousand of their dead in addition to a heavy loss in airplanes tanks guns and muni tions Russian front dispatches said The dispatches gave no immedi ate explanation for the cessation of the nazi attacks which had j been marked by numerous futile charges against Ihc Russian lines from the Black sea coast near Novorossisk through the Kuban Delta to the coast of the sea of Azov The Germans lost almost 5000 men and almost 200 planes in Icjs lhan a far in ex cess of the losses they had counted on it was reported Dispatches Friday had reported tlie use of fresh axis reserves in their Caucasus bridgeheads The fury of the air fights did not slacken in the sector however The red army air force raided a German airdrome causing a num ber of explosions and large fires Russian flyers also struck one of their biggest blows of lic war Friday night when more than 200 bombers raided Instcrburg suc cessfully the fourth raid on east Prussian cities this month It be gan to appear that the Russians and Ihe BritishAmerican aviation forces had divided up their mili tary targets and now were work ing on a definite plan U S Troops Shifted North Make Advance WITH UNITED STATES FORCES NORTH TUNISIAN FUONT Delayed April American infantry plunged into the battle of the Tunisian coffin corner again Friday driving six miles eastward on the northern most front toward the key town of Matcur and capturing a stra tegic hill in desperate fighting on another sector to the south The main American advance was on the Sedjenanc sector of the northern front where oper ations iverc started as a part of the allied general offensive ini tiated by the British first army under 11 Gen K A N Ander son both north and south of McUjezEIBab The Americans pushed six miles castvvard in hard fighting on both sides of the road from Scdjcnane to Macur which lies about 20 miles southwest of Bizerte and 33 miles northwest of Tunis They captured three dominating hills and drove off violent coun terattacks They now hold posi tions about 15 miles west of Ma tcur on both sides of the road A railroad parallels the highway to Malcur Farther south the American forces in heavy fighting captured a strategic hill known as 575 They were given strong American bomber support in these opera tions The American forces were from the second corns under U Gen Gcorec S ration Jr which previously fouffht on the British eighth army flank in southern Tunisia diverting some 35000 nazi Iroops at a critical moment of the battle for the Marclh line and finally miking a junction with the eighth army They were shifted north secretly after that compli cated move that involved thou sands of men and thousands of vehicles Their whereabouts had not been disclosed until Friday when their first advances were made known The Americans arc operating at present in one of the roughest areas of northern Tunisia and have been forced to fight hard foi every mile they advanced Sev eral times they have thrown back stiff counterattacks and captured a considerable number of pri soners MAKE GAINS OF AS MUCH AS 7 MILES IN DRIVE German CounterAttacks Repulsed in Desperate Fighting Along Front B VlllGIL P1NKLEY A L LIED HEADQUARTERS North Africa OIPJ The massed weight of the British first and eighth armies and the American second corps has rolled the axis back as much as seven miles in a general offensive supported by another record breaking aerial onslaught along a 110 mile front in northeastern Tunisia The offensive is now rollinjr Saturdays communique from headquarters of Gen Dwight D Eisenhower disclosed anil Illitcd States troops have gained six miles on the stra tegic road to Matcur on the northernmost front after des perate fighting in which Ger man counterattacks were re pulsed Y The Americans were about 15 miles west of Matcur and perhaps 30 miles southwest of Birerte On other fronts the British first army captured most of im portant Longstop hill north ot McdjczElBab and advanced Wallace Leaves for Miami by Airplane BARRAXQU1LLA Colombia President Henry A Wal lace left by PanAmerican Air ways at a m Saturday tor Miami ending his LatinAmerican lour He is due in Miami this eve ning Colombian government rep resentatives and local authorities bade the Wallace parly farewell at Ihc airport Revision Shows 31 ME323s Downed CAIRO figures Saturday showed that allied fighter planes on Thursday shot clown 31 giant ME323 air trans ports civcr the Kitlf of Tunis in stead of 21 as previously re ported The transports with a capacity of about 140 soldiers each were carrying gasoline and Iroops o Tunisia about seven miles on the Bou Arada front south of Mcdjcz cap turing the town of Goiibellat and knocking out Ifi German tanks in a powerful armored thrust that is still driving eastward north of ScbkretElKourzia The first army was less than 30 miles west of Tunis with its northern spearhead fighting to clear the road to the important highway junction of Tebourba On the southwestern front the French were carrying out aggres sive patrols between the first army and the British eighth army which was hammering at desperate axis resistance about halt way along the 15 mile road from Enfidaville to Bou Fichc on Ihc east coast of Tunisia Meanwhile allied air forces American bomb out a record num ber of 15011 sorties on Friday probably dumping more high explosives on the enemy posi tions than nn any previous day The reappearance ol the Amer ican second corps in the battle for the northeast Tunisian coffin cor ner was announced by head quarters of Gen Sir Harold Alex ander after a period of greatest secrecy regarding its inovements Tiic secrecy covered a swift movement of thousands of men and tanks and other vehicles from the southern front where the forces under It Gen George S Patton Jr joined with the eighth army to the extreme northern sector The aerial attack was especially heavy in support of the Americans on the north nntl French forces tiic corps France DAfriquc which pushed eastward along the north coast uii the American left Hank The luflnaffc virtually was driven from the air on Friday and flying fortresses extended the allied attacks as far as enemy supply bases in Sardinia In all only six allied planes iicrc losl The allied air forces Thursday nigiit and Friday destroyed nine enemy airplanes and set fire to a Inrgc merchant vessel 25 miles west of Sicily Enemy roads rail roads and harbors were heavily pounded The Britisli first army after rapturing txmgstop Hill six miles north of Mcdj07ElBsb also took four miles northeast of Medjcz and pressed cast to clear the enemy from the road to Tebourba Junction British tanks were thrown into the battle southeast of Mcdjc at   

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