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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - April 3, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND ARCHIVES 0 E S 0 I H NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS PULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A copy MASON CITY IOWA SATURDAY APRIL 3 1943 THIS PAPEB CONSISTS OK TOUR SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 151 YANKS ATTACK ROAD TOWARD COAST Allied Airmen Scatter Jap Sh ip Con cen tra tion i gl I BOMBERS RAID 13 VESSELS IN KAVIENG PORT Nippon Warships May Be Thrusting Anew at U SHed Guadalcanal By TI1E ASSOCIATED PRESS Allied warplanes have scattered another concentration of nearly 20 Japanese ships in the islands above Australia Gen Douglas MacArlhurs headquarters an nounced Saturday amid signs that other enemy warships may be thrusting anew toward American held Guadalcanal in the Solomons Two actions suggested the new enemy threat to Guadalcanal 1 A Japanese communique broadcast by the Berlin radio as serted that Japanese fleet planes had shot down 47 allied aircraft off the Russell islands 50 miles northwest of Guadalcanal Nine Japanese planes were listed lost 2 Tokios claim followed issu ance of a U S navy announce ment Friday that American bombers attacked a force of five Japanese destroyers on the night of March 31April 1 near Kolom banfiari island 190 miles north west of Guadalcanal Concurrently the navy said American sliot down is out of 30 to 40 Japanese zeros in a violent air battle northwest of Guadalcanal The Tokio claim that Japanese fleet planes shot down 47 allied planes indicated a sizable force of Japanese warships in the wa ters immediately north of Guad alcanal There was no information however whether this force in cluded the five Japanese des troyers attacked by U S fliers three nights ago off Kolomban gari Allied headquarters said united nations airmen pounced on 13 Japanese ships including destroyers in the harbor at Kavicng New Ireland 550 miles above the allied base al Tort Moresby New Guinea and half a dozen others in nearby Stcf fcns Strait A communique said the raiders scored probable hits on a 10000 ton Japanese transport and on a 6000 ton cargo ship but darkness prevented observation of further results of the attack Other allied planes bombed the enemy bases at Kavieng Madang New Guinea and Gasmata and Cape Gloucester New Britain and carried out lowlevel bombing and machinegun attacks on Japanese trenches in the Mubo sector in northern New Guinea U S flying fortresses ami Lib erators also pounded the harhor and airdrome at Finschafcn on the northeast coast of New Guinea On the Burma front RAF Blen heim bombers set fires at the Japaneseoccupied rail of Kanbalu and bombed enemy tar gets on the Mayu peninsula along the Bay of Bengal Field Marshal Sir Archibald P Wavclls British legions have been driving toward the Japanese base at Ak yab BRIG GEN RAMEY AND CREW KEFORTED LOST ALLIED HEADQUARTERS 3N AUSTRALIA ters announced Saturday that 47 year old Bvig Gen Howard K Ramcy and his crew were lost on a recent bombing mission Gen Ramey was commander of the fifth bomber command of Ihc fifth United States air force He was the sixth United States gen eral to be killed listed as missing or wounded in the war He was the successor to Brig Gen Kenneth M Walker who was lost on a bombing mission over Kabaul last January Jef f ers to Quit If Synthetic Rubber Program All Set Will Resign July 1 Unless New Problems Are Encountered OIL SUPPLY IN MIDWEST AREA RESHUFFLED IS WASHINGTON UPt Rubber Director William M Jeffers said Saturday he will resign on July 1 if the synthetic rubber program is all set by that time and re turn to his duties as president of the Union Pacific railroad H the program encounters fur ther difficulties he said he will remain on the job as long as neces sary It all depends on the program he said If it is all set and coming through after July 1 I have a big job to cio on the railroad If it is not coming through 1 am going to stay with the program until it does Jeffers has been pushing the synthetic rubber program aggres sively He clashed with War Pro duction Board Chairman M Nelson over the failure of to grant what Jetfcrs considered adequate priorities on critical ma terials for the plants The con troversy was carried lo the white house and Jeffers got a large share of what he wanted Earlier this week he reported lo a congressional committee that the outlook for synthetic rubber has become somewhat clearer and that he believed all of the nations motor vehicles could be kept supplied with tires WILLIAM M JEFFERS REDS STORM AT NOVOROSSISK Map Shows Advance to 36 Miies From Smolensk By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS An official soviet war map dis closed Saturday that the red arm ies were storming at the eastern ate of Novorossisk Black sea naval base and had advanced within miles of the Gcrnjan keystone base at Smolensk on the central front V The map also showed that the Russians had driven almost to Velizh 10 miles northwest of Smolensk and within 15 miles of white Russia and were only 12 miles east of Tasanrog in the sea of Azov west of Kostov Soviet columns slogging through deep mud along the old Napol eonic highway toward Smolensk were said lo have reached a point northeast of Yartsevo one of the last major outposts guardin Smolensk on the highway In the Caucasus the war map revealed that the Russians were not only closing in on Novorossisk but were also sciucczing the Ger mans back against the Kerch strait farther north with soviet troops only 11 miles east of Temryuk on the Tainan peninsula Temryuk lies about 20 miles from the waters of Taman bay an inlet off the Kerch strait whicr separates the peninsula from the Germanheld Crimea On the Kharkov front soviet headquarters said the Russians heat off continuing German al tacks alone the upper Donets river while far to the north Marshal Scmcon Timoshcnkos army pressed an encirclement movement against the nazi base at Staraya Kussa south of Lake Ilmcn 3S Meanwhile Russia formally an nounced the end of her grcntwin ler offensive and declared thn the campaign lasting four month and 20 days had cost the Germans II93525 men including 850000 killed KMVAN IS MISSING NOFOLK Va Ensign Edward Jilberto Rohner 21 USNA of Iowa City Iowa is missing since March 28 when a land plane he was piloting crashed in Chesa peake Bay the fifth naval district announced Friday Bny War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your carrier boy Fort Dodge Teachers Pay Given Increase FORT DODGE Dodge teachers whose salaries this yeai amounted to less than S2250 were given an increase amounting to If per cent In a few cases in the lower brackets where salaries were noticeably out of proportion slightly larger raise was granted Salaries which were above S225i this year will receive increases o less than 15 per cent Supl o Schools H J Williams was granted a three year contract KISKAS CAMP AREA IS RAIDED Several Hits Scored by American Bombers WASHINGTON jombers continuing their heavj jounding of the Japanese bast on iiska island in the Aleutian raided llio enemys main camp area there four times Thursday he navy reported Saturday scor ng several hits Communique No 333 said North Pacific 1 On April 1st a force o army liberator consolidated B 24 and Mitchell North Ameri can B25 bombers escorted b ightning Lockheed P3B fight crs made four attacks agains Japanese installations at Kiska Hits were scored on the cnemj Yiain camp area South Pacific AH dates cas ongitudc 2 On April 2 lighting and orsair Vought FILT fighters at tacked and set on fire a small Japanese cargo vessel at anchor it Vclla Lavella island New Georgia group The attacks on Kiska raised to 38 the total number of raids made against the Japanese outpost since Lhe spring aerial offensive there started March 1 fiickenlooper Says F R Veto Indicates Farming Not Recognized DES MOINES B B Hickenloopcr Saturday said the veto by President Roosevelt of the Bankhcad bill indicates that ag riculture has not yet been recog nized by the administration as a vital war industry The president Friday refused to sign the measure which would have excluded payment of federal Jarm benefits from consideration in computing parity prices The governor said such exclu sion would have lifted farm prices about 6 lo 8 per cent That would have meant only a fraction of 1 per cent increase in the cost of the finished product to the the governor added I cannot see how such a moderate increase would con tribute in any substantial degree to inflation1 Consumers Will Not Be Visibly Affected Aides of Ickes Declare By CHARLES MOLOXY WASHINGTON Administrator Harold L Ickes Sat urday ordered a drastic reshuffling of the petroleum supply and dis tribution system in the midwest to expand the flow of fuel to the oil short east Midwestern consumers will not be visibly affected aides said The major objectives of the or der affecting 15 midwestcrn states comprising petroleum district two are 1 to secure maximum effi ciency in the use of all transpor tation facilities in the area thus releasing additional railroad tank cars to swell the number serving the east and 2 to increase sup plies available for shipment to the east What we are here directing Ickes said in a statement ex Plaining the order is the co ordination of the supply and dis tribution of about 1000000 bar rels of petroleum products a day more than the peacetime con sumption of all Europe as though it were all distributed by a single company While consumers will continue to order their requirements of pe troleum products from their usual sources of supply the industry through exchanges loans sales anc purchases among its members wil see to it that these requirements actually are filled from the near est terminal To achieve nearestterminal de liveries a network of zones is EC up in 15 Ohio Indiana Illinois Kentucky Ten no s s e e Wisconsin Minnesota Iowa Missouri Oklahoma Kan sas North and South Dakota am Nebraska Ickes said he expected the zon ing to also 1 Shorten the distance any pro duct is transported 2 Eliminate most movements a general southerly and westerly direction substituting movements a general northerly or easterly direction 3 Eliminate backhauling or crosshauling of oil products 4 Substitute pipeline movements or tank car truck barge or lake tanker movements in many cases V The petroleum administrator also announced action to aid small independent refineries in the midwest in setting a share of the tightened crude oil in that area He ordered 40500 barrels a day or approximately four per cent of the crude produced in district two set aside for direct allocation to refineries which the petroleum administration for war specifics in the districts ISstatc area Designation of the refineries is o be based upon their capacity for producing war products the supply of crude available to them from other sources and efficient use of transportation facilities Companies which will set aside this oil will be all those in the district which ran 2000 barrels a day or more from producing leases in the area in December 1942 FACES with manslaughter in the Tulsa Okla hotel room shooting of Mrs T Karl Simmons 55 Sirs Ella B Howard 44 year old divorcee oV Fort Worth Tex is shown with her attorney Charles Coakley as she left the courthouse in Tulsa Inset shows the shun woman wealthy socialite and wife of a Tulsa oil man Woman Held for Trial in Tulsa Hotel Room Slaying Divorcee Charged With Manslaughter Bond Is Set at Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Warmer Saturday afternoon Saturday night and Sunday forenoon all tempera tures above freezing strong winds IOWA Warmer Saturday night and Sunday forenoon fresh to strong winds Saturday MINNESOTA Light showers in extreme north Saturday night and north portion Sunday fore noon Warmer Saturday night and Sunday forenoon except be coming colder extreme north portion Sunday forenoon High winds Saturday IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Friday 42 Minimum Friday night 2fl At 8 a m Saturdav 31 YEAR AGO Maximum 57 Minimum 28 12 Are Injured When Elevator in Omaha Store Makes Plunge OMAHA Ncbr UR1 Twelve persons were taken to hospitals and eight others were shaken up and bruised when an elevator in the J C Penny company store fell 20 feet into the basement here Saturday None of the occupants of the lift was believed seriously injured Store officials refused lo dis cuss the accident or to allow employes to talk H was learned however that the elevator in charge of Gladys Lee 20 was between the first and second floor when it suddenly Jell into the basement Miss Lee suf fered an ankle injury TULSA Okla Pleas Judge Grady S Cornell Sat urday ordered Mrs Ella B How ard Fort Worth divorcee held in 510000 bail for trial on a charge of manslaughter in a hotel room slaying of Mrs T Karl Simmons widely known Tulsa horse woman The 41 year oil defendant wept at the decision her first exhibition of emotion through out the preliminary hearing Her 20 year old son Louis How ard Jr attempted to comfort her The verdict was a disappoint ment to County Atty Dixie Gil mer who had asked the court to hold Mrs Howard for trial ona murder charge Shortly before the judges ordor was given Gilmcr and Assistant Prosecutor John Ward argued that it was not possible to prepare a manslaughter case on evidence in the states hands A defense move to reopen tes timony in the preliminary hear ing delayed the verdict and lid J Mace a gunsmith look the stand f X IHacc testified that the gun used in theslaying was brought to him by a woman for clean in and repairing a week or so before the killing He said he was not acquainted with the woman but a fellow employe identified inthe record as K RI Murphy told him later that his visitor was Mrs Sim mons Cilmcr objected vigorously to Maces testimony but failed to from the court a continuance to bring in rerebuttal evidence Defense counsel protested that he had had plenty of time to trace the sun Under normal procedure court attaches said Mrs Howard would go on trial in the June term of the Tulsa county district court on the manslaughter accusation BLAST 2 GERMAN UBOAT BASES Strike in Force at Lonent St Nazairc LONDON four cngincd bombers struck in forci Friday night at Lorient and St Nazairc Germanys two larges submarine bases on the French At lautic coast The double blow ended a four night weatherenforced lull ii the AngloAmerican aerial offcn sive following the heavy attack Monday night on Berlin and Bochum the latter a steel anc railway center in Germany Rhur Only two pianos were lost i Friday nights raids and in sill sidiary minelaying operations considered 111 unusually small lot tor attacks on such heavilyde fended targets Every type of bomb from wo ton block blisters lo Iwoponnc incendiaries was unloaded on til submarine pens repair shops am other Uboat facilities of St Na zaire and Lorient both of whicl already have been so badly bat tercel by AngloAmerican plane that the Germans arc believed I be on the point of moving the bases farther south in France The raid on Lorient was the 69th of the war and that o Nazaire the 47th Lorient was attacked in daylight by 8th U S air force March G Eisenhower Voices Pride in Progress 15y EDWAKD KENNEDY ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTI I AFRICA Gen Dwight D Eisenhower returning rom conferences with Gen Sir lernard L Montgomery and len Sir Harold Alexander said Saturday fresh forces under Al xander with effective air sup ovt were continuing to make nlistactory progress in the task f smashing the axis out of The allied commander in chief usnected the Marelh front He said that every American had a right lo feel proud of the progress made and that Americans in this theater shared the pride of the liritish in he achievements of the eighth army in driving Field Marshal Erwiu llomincl from the fortified Marcth positions f The days allied communique cporting patrol activity all along he Tunisian front said the Erit sli first army of Lt Gen K A M derson was making further irogress in the north and inflict ng casualties on the enemy Brit sh and American aerial sorties igainst Rommels retreating orccs on the coastal road above 3anes were reported General Eisenhower said the air orces had produced a fighting nachinc of the highest morale ircat efficiency and complete de termination to finish the job A 2 iZ He said that on visiting one American air group he had found the flyers in the highest spirits and delighted to work with the KAF to get their knowledge and experience Eisenhower said the situation now permitted the disclosure o certain dispositions of the troop fighting in Tunisia The elements which form Gen eral Alexanders 13th army group are The British first army undei Anderson in the north in which is incorporated a French corps under General Kocltz MAIN POSITIONS OF NAZI FORCES ARE ASSAULTED British Push Closer to Mateur Allied Airmen Continue With Attacks By VIRGIL PINKLEY ALLIED HEADQUARTERS North Africa UR American tanks and infantry attacked the main German positions near the Kebili road junction southeast of El Guctar Saturday morning in an attempt to break through lo the coastal plain There was no immediate indica j lion how successful the attack had been front dispatches also dis that the American had withdrawn slightly in the Fon louk area lo strengthen their lank Uleanwhile in the north Ihe British first army pushed closer o Mateur which is only 1C miles rom Bizcrle r Despite bail weather gener ally the great AngloAmerican aerial armadu rave the harried axis forces no rest Light bomb ers anil figlileruomlicrs raked German positions and transport north of Gahcs in relays the enemy airfield at Lu Faucon nerie was bombed twice and raging fires were left burning and fighters miunUuied con stant lull V Six enemy fighters were sent crashing to the earth and four allied planes were lost No details of the latest advance of Lieul Gen K A N Ander sons first army in northern Tu nisia were given in the commu nique but dispatches indicated that the troops already were less than 30 miles Irom Bizcrtc First army patrols successfully engaged and inflicted casualties on an enemy patrol the com munique said Elsewhere it re ported only patrol activity Thirtytwo German tanks at tacked the American position some 15 miles east of E Guetar Friday but a hurricane barrage St last the DIES FROM BURNS DES MOINES Esther Sanford 24 died late Friday burns suffered earlier in the day in an explosion which firemen said occurred when she poured kerosene on coals in a heating stove Buy Mar Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy English Official Fined for Ration Violation LONDON Gen Sir Percy Robert Laurie provost mar shal of Great Britain was fined an amount equivalent to about Saturday for using a civil ian ration book as well as the mil itary ration cards to which he was entitled as a soldier Sir Percy a former assistant commissioner of the London metropolitan police allegedly obtained an extra ration Destroyer Escort to Be Named for lowan CLARIKDA destroyer escort vessel will lie named for Ensign Don T Griswold of Clarin da Tirst Page county member of the armed forces to be killed in this war Secretary of the Navy Knox related the plans in a to the ensigns mother Mrs Don Griswold Sr The ensign died June 4 1042 during the battle of Midway The American force under U Gcn George S ration in the regrouped and m longer a parl of Ihc first includes four di visions that already have been in combat the first armored di vision and the first ninth and 34th infantry divisions The veteran British cightl army under General Montgomery which includes among other units a New Zealand division an In dian division and two British in fantry divisions The record of the eighth armj is loo brilliant to need any praise General Eisenhower told war cor respondents It has chased one of the enemys most powerfu forces across the desert and it still full of energy for the fini blow in Tunisia Every American soldier share the pride of the British in the in clusion of these ighlcis in the allied forces Discussing the progress of the campaign Gen Eisenhower said We have been fighting this campaign as allies Since No vember for the forces ill north Africa ami since October for the eighth army every llritish and American citizen and every British ami American solrticr had a right to draw pride anil inspiration from the record which this united force is mak ing for itself Many of the soldiers of the British first army have been in action almost since the first day of landing in North Africa They have gone through the hardships of a winter in the mountains and they have come out of it full of high spirits and determination In the days of the first drive into Tunisia we threw evory Amcrican available into the line lo help Ihe rirst army These American units now have been knocked onl the other 20 patches said three of them turned back and dis Meantime the Kritish eighth army was massing strength for an assault to break through Ger man Marshall Erwiu Rommels last natural defense lie above Sousse nearly HO miles to the north The German Africa corps now was entrenched along the north rim of the deep waterfilled Wadi Akarit at the northern entrance lo the Gabcs Gap 20 miles above Gabes W The Algiers radio reported at 8 n in Algiers time that fighting has broken out anew between eighth army vanguards and Rom mels rear guards 248 miles north of Gabes a suggestion Hint ad vance British forces have swept across the Wadi The main body of the Africa Corps was said to be continuing its rapid retreat The alliedcontrolled Morocco radio quoted unconfirmed reports that Rommels headquarters were no longer in Tunisia and radio London relayed a Swiss report j that Rommel would become iiasou officer and military adviser In the Italian high command when he leaves Tunisia The length of Ihc German stand at Wadi Akarit is ex pected to depend as much on the progress of twin American thrusts from the northeast against his rear as on the im pending frontal attack by Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys eighth army The northernmost of the two American columns already is east of Alaknascy and within 30 miles of Wadi Akarit In its latest ad vance reported Saturday the col umn drove six miles north from Maknassy to Ihe outskirts of Mc bcri Zcbbcus In central Tuniui French regrouped and arc fighting as an farther across Japs Use USBuilt Planes to Train Flyers SAN DIEGO Japanese are using Americanbuilt planes lo train their flyers stationed in Ba tavia the Ryan Aeronautical com pany reported Saturday Lt Comdr H F C Holtz of the Royal Netherlands Military Flying school at Jackson Miss wrote Ryan officials that the book by stating in his application had been captured in Java that he was retired and flown lo Batavia airfield I completely destroyed entity under General Alexander Ousseltja plane without notable Thc American soldiers arc showopposition A communique said ing every dav that they arc capI10 Sarnson of one enemy posi ablc ol fishting with the war I tlon Oucb Kcblr vallcv was machines which our factories arc turning out Our allied ground air and naval forces arc cooperating to the single end of destroying the hostile forces in Tunisia A spe cial taction of he navy under Admiral Cunningham and of the air forces directed strategically by Air Chief Marshal Tedder arc to interfere with the enemys maintenance and supply and to protect our own In this role they have achieved some remarkable successes and their work is of an inestimable value Alexander and his lo General round forces Dubuque Salvage Yards Damaged by Flames DUBUQUE rT Fire raged through the salvage yards of Marmis and Solomon here early Saturday morning and destroyed a large quantity ot hides old tires and bailed paper Firemen culled at a m fought the blaze for four hours before it was brought under control NH immediate estimate ot the loss was available   

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