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Mason City Globe Gazette: Wednesday, February 24, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 24, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS1 VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS LEAEEP WIHEs MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 24 1943 SHIS PAPER CONSISTS OP TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE j WtaJLfc jf TWU SECTIONS t SECTION ONE NO 118 PLANES RAKE ROMMELS RETREAT ni i RUSSIANS PUSH ON DEEPLY INTO NORTH UKRAINE Peasants Dig Up Buried Farm Tools Prepare for Spring Plantings MOSCOW red army smashed deeper Wednesday into the northern Ukraine northwest of Kharkov where the capture of Sumy Lebedin and Akhtyrka lashioned a soviet bludgeon aimed at Kiev and the important rail way junction of Konotop Wednesdays midday commu nique said more strongly forti fied settlements were captured as Russian soldiers racing along muddy loads and across barren black fields struck west of Sumy 100 miles northwest of Kharkov 75 miles southeast of Konotop and 195 miles east of Kiev A water barrier also wasforced and about 600 Germans killed in the capture of a number of towns north of Kursk where it wasan nounced Tuesday night the Rus sians had driven to within 40 miles of Orel from the south with the capture of Maloarkhangelsk Soviet tanks bearing automatic gunners followed by infantry surged westward in spite of spring thaws as the drive proceeded northwest of Kharkov on a 49 mile front with Sumy at the north end of the line Akhtyrfca at the south end and Lebedin in the center Soldiers ahfl drivers dis carded heir fur hats and coats to cool their steaming faces in the warm windblowing from the Dnieper In their wake peasants were digging out buried grain and hid den tools and waved joyfully at rnudplastercd tanks as they pre pared to get spring planting un derway in the rich area On other sectors of the long front the red army was actively pressing its campaign A TASS dispatch said the final outcome is Hearing in the Caucasus and the offensive in the Donets basin is gradually coming to a head Soviet dispatches did not men tion any fighting in the north but a DNB broadcast from Berlin said the Russians had launched a ma jor attack on a wide front with strong tankand artillery support southeast of Lake Ilmcii Tuesday The broadcast said 37 Russian tanks were destroyed But in the Donets basin strong German counterattacks were noted while soviet troops forg ing west of Rostov engaged in handtohand fighting to oc cupy a fortified town The Germans concentrated large tanks and mobile infantry in the Krasnoarmeisk area north of Sta lino in the Donets basin in an at tempt to reestablish severed communications arteries the war bulletin said Our troops however are hold ing back the Hitlerite onslaught and causing them heavy losses the communique stated The operations in the Ukraine carried the Russians into Sumy a rail junction 100 miles northwest of Kharkov The advance toward Orel on the red armys 2oth anniversary had carried into Maloarkhangelsk 40 miles south of Orel and an equal distance north of Kursk Feriana YANKJRITISH Rationed Foods for Cafes to Be Cut About 50 Per Cent Allowance to Be Based on Amounts Served in December of 1942 CHURCHILL IS KECOVERIXG LQIVDON Prime Minister Winston Churchills temperature has returned to normal and he is recovering rapidly from his ill s ness it was learned Wednesday WASHINGTON URThe office of price administration announced Wednesdaythat supplies oE ra tioned foods to restaurants hotels ami other eating establishments will be slashed March 1 by ap proximately the same amount as the cut for home consumers OPA officials estimated the cut will be sligJifly less than 50 per cent and said it will be made on the basis of the amount of rationed food used and the number of persons served dur Jiiff December 19J2 Their allotments of processed food will be based on a maximum allowance of sixtenths of a ration point for each person served dur ing December 19J2 This com pares with approximately five tenths of a ration point a meal al lowed individual holders of war ration book 2 The difference OPA said rep resents an allowance for the fact that restaurant owners cannot calculate with the same accuracy as the housewife the amount of various foodstuffs they will be re quired to use for each meal be cause of a higher waste factor and fluctuations in the number of pa trons The OPA fixed the following average point values for compu tation of institutional allowances Canned and bottled processed loods dried beans peas and lenr tils n pounds a pound frozen foods lit points a pound dried and dehydrated fruits soups aiid soup mixtures IS points a pound The first rationing period for restaurants hotels and other cat ing establishments will cover March and Anril instead of March alone as in the case of home consumers The OPA also fixed the maxi mum sugar and coffee rations for institutional users during the first two months ration period at 03 pounds of sugar and 013 pounds of coffee a person served in De cember 192 In no case however may the institutional user receive more than he received under pre vious ration orders affecting sifar and coffee The new basis will mean a n a re duction in sugar and coffee allot and monis lo most restaurants hotels OPA said Boarding houses serving fewer than 50 persons will be treated as large ouseholds through pooling l of war ration book 2 Larger boarding houses will be classed with restaurants and hotels on a two months allotment basis Slight Sugar Cut WASHINGTON The office of price administration Wednesday announced a slight reduction in the sugar ration Stamp No 12 in Book No 1 will be valid on March for five pounds but OPA said that amount of sugar will have to last for 11 weeks or until the end of May This represents a slight drop from the basic sugar ration of one half pound per person per week or five pounds in 10 weeks Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Much colder Wed nesday afternoon and Wednes day night with cold wave Wed nesday night lowest tempera ture in Mason City Thursday morning about 5 below con tinued cold Thursday forenoon strong winds with snow flur ries Wednesday afternoon and evening IOWA Much colder Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon cold wave Wednesday night lowest temperature r a n g i n y from zero to 5 below iii the northwest portion to 5 above to 10 above in the southern por tion by Thursday morning oc casional light snow flurries Wednesday afternoon and early Wednesday night with fresh to moderately stroiiy winds MINNESOTA Colder east and south portions with cold wave Wednesday nigh t continued cold northwest portion lowest temperature Wednesday night ranging from 15 to 25 below north lo zero to 5 below south portion continued cold Thurs day forenoon IN MASON CITY llobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday Minimum Tuesday night At 8 a m Wednesday YEAR AGO Maximum Afinimum 35 21 26 20 14 COLD WAVE TO REACH IOWA Mercury to Dip Below Zero in Some Areas DES MOINES cold wave is expected to hit Iowa Wednesday night sending tt mer cury below zero in some sections the weather bureau predicted The bureau said much colder weather was in store for the state Wednesday night arid Thursday forenoon Occasional snow flur ries were forecast for Wednesday afternoon and early Wednesday night with fresh to moderately strong winds Minimum temperatures Wednes day night are expected to range from 5 below to zero in the north west portion Tlie mercury is ex pected to dip to between 5 and 10 above in the southern portion Thursday morning The cold wave is expected to check a rise in the Des Moincs river which has caused flood con ditions in some areas S E Deck er assistant meteorologist in the weather office here said Ice breaking up in the river above DCS Moinc has caused a gorge at the Euclid avenue bridge on the north edge of the city Decker said and water is flooding the low areas Rites to Be on Thursday Mrs Martha Jane Forsythe Parker widow of the late A T Parker who was a pioneer busi ness man of Mason City and man ager of the1 Parker opera house ot early days died at her home Crescent drive at oclock Tuesday evening following u short illness She had remained active and took a great interest in current events until the time of her death Teacher of the original six Ring ling brothers who later founded IN MAPPING OF FOOD PROGRAM Wickard Wants Congress to Decide on Means or Farm Income Increase WASHINGTON Agriculture Wickard asked ui inti original six ling brothers who later founded Agriculture Wickard asked and operated the Ringling brothers COI1sress Wednesday for a clear circus of Jimmy Montague fa immediately to proceed mous columnist of Francis H ulth an mous columnist of Francis H Shepard electrical traction expert and or hundreds of other Mason City persons in all walks of life Mrs Parker had a host of friends and acquaintances that she kept in touch with throughout her life Born in Wisconsin Mrs Parker had moved uilh her family at an early date to McGregor Iowa where she grew to womanhood and taught for several years be fore moving to Mason City in 1880 While at McGregor she was the teacher of the Ringing brothers the sons of a harness maker who later founded the famous show at Baraboo Wis Sirs Parker came o Mason City lo teach in the old Central school which was built in the early 70s She taught there for six years until her marriage to A T Parker Oct 26 1886 at McGregor closing at that time a successful and outstanding teaching career which was started upon graduation from a teachers college in New York state Throughout her married life in Mason City Mrs Parker was ac tive in many social and civic or ganizations She was a member of the Penelope club the Midland club the Maria Mitchell club the Womans club and the Congrega tional church where she also taught Sunday school Mrs Parker was preceded in death by her husband Feb 2 1926 Of the immediate family Mrs R L Jackson daughter 825 Second street southwest and Miss Mary belle Jackson granddaughter now attending Carlton college survive On March 21 1339 Mrs Parker and Sirs Jackson jointly gave Parkers Woods to the city for park purposes This was the plot of ground lying west of the railroad tracks in tiic west part of the city which was recognized in earlier days as the circus grounds and which from the earliest days of the city had been used for picnic grounds Funeral services will be held at oclock Thursday afternoon at the Major Memorial chapel with tlie Rev Roy C Helfenstein pastor of the Congregational Opposes Transfer of JapAmericans From n etery The body will lie in state at LentCrS tO I OJlP0P the funeral home until the time of services church in charge Burial will be at Elmwood cem etery The body will lie in state at DES MOINES C V Fmtllay RFort Wed nesday offered the senate a reso lution opposing the transfer of young JapaneseAmericans from relocation centers to American colleges and universities If any such youths already have been admitted to colleges and uni versities they should be returned to their relocation camps he urged He protested against allowing such JapaneseAmericans to carry on their studies uninterrupted by war while all other young men 18 or over are obliged to quit school and enter the armed forces PELLA BUSINESSMAN DIES PELLA were held here Wednesday for James Van Dusscldorp 5X Pella businessman who died Monday at Rochester Minn He was a merchant here many years HARRIS TO BE PHILS MANAGER SPOKTS BULLETIN PHILADELPHIA ley Bucky Harris the boy manager of the Washington Senators when they beat the New York Giants in Jhe 192 world series was named mana ger of the Phils Wednesday William D Cox New York sportsman who purchased the Phils from the National league last week announced the ap pointment of the 6 year old Harris at a press conference notmced 1943 f a r m produc tion p r o g r am along lines in tended to raise farm income without raising prices to con sumers T h a t p r o gram w h i c h had e v o k e d sharp criticism from members of the congrcs s i o n a I farm bloc was out lined before the Planes Bomb Narrow Road By WES GALLAGHER ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA and British forces after a bitter threeday battle have hurled Marshal Erwin Rommels flood tide of armor back into the moun tains of the Kasserine gap in cen tral Tunisia under a hail ot bursting bombs from hundreds ot planes An allied headquarters com munique said the backwash the ICommel thrust bcsan early Tuesday after American and British forces had successfully stood off his attacks during three days of heavy fighting Our infantry and armored unils were in contact with tlie enemy throughout the day inflict ing heavy casualties taking many prisoners and obtaining some WICKARD house agricul ture committee Wednesday I take it tor granted the food administrator said that almost everyone feel that increased costs to farmers necessitate increased returns on many agricultural commodities during 19 Now I want lo state frankly that one way lo enable farmers to receive the returns necessary to cover their costs would be by increasins prices 1 do not be lieve however that all things considered that this is the prof Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps front your GlobeGazette carrier boy Substantial increases in farm prices would inevitably lead lo increases iu prices and costs all aloiicr the line and might re sult in an inflation which in the Ions run would be even more ruinous lo farmers than to others The secretary said that there are other ways of giving farmers increased returns He outlined them as follows 1 Government support of pri ces of all farm products needed in the war effort 2 A government offer to pur chase certain as soybeans peanuts flax seed canned vegetables sugar beets and perhaps resell them to processors and distribu tors at prices in line with OPA price ceilings 3 An offer o farmers of in centive payments on needed war crops in order to enable the pro to meet increased costs without raising consumer prices Wickard has not been able to proceed with the incentive pay ment part of his program because congress has refused so far to appropriate sought for such payments Farm state congressmen have also criticized the idea of government purchase of farm commodities and resale at lower prices In emphasizing that the farm program should be cleared up be fore planting time starts next month Wickard said In ofder to make more sure of obtaining maximum agri cultural production in 1913 we should liave a clear mandate from congress immediately If we are going to get vital pro duction we must have programs which either through purchase or loan operation or through incentive payments will enable farmers to cover the costs of their extra efforts The secretary told the commit tee that his department contem plates recruiting of a land army of 3500000 older men women boys and girls of high school ape and other emergency workers aid in the attainment of farm production goals 1943 motored liberator cargo plane which the army has dubbed the Biymg Dutchman of the Skies wandered over the Atlantic and Mexican gulf for 2000 miles with out pilot or crew aboard and fi nally crashed on a Mexican mountain Feb 3 it was disclosed Wednesday The plane was abandoned by six crew members and two pas sengers off the Florida coast when it became unmanageable and was last seen heading in the general direction of Norway How it got to Mexico lo IIR to an end there one of the strangest chapters in avii lion history is a matter of con jecture Six of the occupants were res cued One person was apparently drowned and the eighth occupant is unaccounted for Pvt Stanley Gutowski radio operator Bayonne N J lost his life preserver and disappeared after about four hours in the wa ter Second Lt Bernard A Brannon Chattanooga Tenn assistant nav igator is also missing The other six occupants res cued by the coast guard after floating several hours at sea were First Lt H C Ulmer At lanta Ga pilot First Lt C W Hauth Baltimore iUd copilot First Ll R H Digby Lansing Mich navigator Pvt K J Rid dle Nutley J crewmanSec ond Lt C K Knutson 3004 Cam bridge ave Des Moincs Iowa passenger Second Lt A E Lloyd San Diego Cal The plane took off from south ern Florida shortly after midnight I eb 9 for South America About 80 miles out the two passengers noted a bad tail flutter The plane lost altitude rapidly dropping from 9000 to 5300 feet and the 2000 Miles Without Pilot or Crew occupants began jettisoning the cargo Lieutenant tjlmcr turned the plane around fighting to keep its nose up and headed for Flor ida He odcrcd his companions to prepare to bail out since a safe landing seemed impossible The Plane continued at about ISO miles an hour vibrating from Ihe tail flutter Thinking he was over the Florida coast Ulmer or dered his companions to jump Then he turned the plane back toward the sea set the automatic pilot for level Flight to keep the plane from becoming a menace ashore and jumped also It turned out that Ulmer had mistaken shallow coastal waters tor land and the eight occupants landed in the water Each had Mae West life pre servers Gutowski lost his in de taching his parachute For about three hours he clung to Lieutenant Lloyd both floating on the latters preserved Gutowski bacame ill from swallowing sea water and could swim no longer Lloyd held him for another hour until he was seized by a cramp and lost his hold Gutowski disappeared Three or four hours later the six survivors were rescued but no trace of Brannon was found Lightened by the loss of cargo and personnel he plane flew on into the nichl In some unknown manner its course became re versed After a flight of 10 or 12 hours without the aid of human hands it crashed with its fuel tanks emptr on a Mexican mountain ZOOO miles distant Mexican authorities reported the crash shortly after noon Feb 9 but were mystified by the ab sence of survivors or victims U S army officers finally established the identity of the derelict of the skies abandoned enemy material communique said the With the coming of daylight Maj Gen Carl Spaatz American ir chief on the Tunisian front hrew almost every British and American plane at his disposal against the battered and retreat ing Germans They turned the road from Thala through the Kasserine valley walled by 1000 and 5 000 foot mountains into a veri table hell of exploding bombs and machine gun fire Even flying fortresses usually usecl only for heavy bombardment of airfields and ports joined in the attacks smashing tons of bombs on the roads along which Rommel was attempting to withdraw Pilots of both the RAF and the American airforcc report great damage was done to the retreat ing forces It appeared that Rommel had suffered the greatest losses the Germans have met in Tunisia Fortresses twinmotored ma rauders and Mitchells and Bostons all joined in the devastating at tacks on the Kasserine Sbcilla and Feriana areas Hurricane bombers light nings airaeobras and spitfires uere among the light stuff which poured machine gun and cannon fire into trucks and then raked roadside ditches for hid ing Germans Formation after fonnatinti at tacked the Kasserine and Sbeitla areas with the fortresses first laying neat strings of bombs along the roadsides and marauders Mitchells and attack planes fol lowing Even outside the battle area one convoy of 20 German vehicles on the Feriana road was blasted to splinters Tobogganned Out of Burning House Just Before Building Fell LONDON award of i meda lo Lt J K R Crews re vealed Wednesday how he in icniously rescued himself and luo others from a blazing house during an air raid Crews ripped T door from its hinges placed a man arid his wife on it gave it a shove and jumped on The cioor obogganncd down the stairs and yuwn me siairs aim wane a bcoltisn out of the house just as the roof blocked another r collapsed TANKS AND MEN PRESS PURSUIT Allies Open Offensive After Withstanding Assaults for 3 Days ALLIED HEADQUAR TERS IN NORTH AFRICA Erwin Rom mels army badly mauled hom a major defeat at the bands of batik toutjliened American and British troops Wednesday withdrew shat tered armored columns to wan Feriana in southern Tu nisia under a Juii of slicll fire and bombardment from hun dreds of allied planes At the same time Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys eighth army surged with in creasing power at axis de fenses in southern Tunisia V Earlier dispatches from al lied headquarters said tlie Ger mans had been hurled back to the western cud of the Kasser ine siaii in western retreat of at least M the newest report may mean that Rommel had forced or wus fociui forced out of the pass toward Fcrnia farther south The British radio in a broad cast recorded by CBS quoted its correspondent with Montgomery as saying big artillery duels are talcing place between tlic eighth armys spearheads just a few miles from the Marclh line and the axis guns probably firing from the main bell of the enemy forti fications A Berlin broadcast recorded in fighting for the London southeast area of the Atlas moun tains had temporarily halted after asis troops had killed 4500 allied troops and wounded or captured 155UQ more There was no con firmation of these figures from al lied sources Field dispatches said American ami British troops reinforced by 40 ton tanks were pur suing the enemy from Thala Thala is 25 miles north of Kas serine Rakcil from h r s I i n bombs from hundreds of allied planes Hummel was now reported attempting to make a stand only three miles from the mouth of the Kasserine gap A This indicated a retreat of at least M milcs from the highwaler mark ot the axis advance Rommel still was 53 miles weit ot the starling poinl of his offensive at Faict pass however A Kernels dispatch from allied headquarters syhl a battalion about ipoo Italians had been trapped in another pass leading toward Siliana about 70 miles northeast of Kafserinc French Moroccan troops let the Italians Miter and tlicn closed in the clis aatch suici while a Scottish rcgi from allied hcad j v rffMVi f r If drives in Tunisia vuiaciv were reported reversed after failure of tlie nazi spearheads to crack allied defenses south of Thala aKl east of Tebessa where a threeday battle has been raging Broken line is approximate front   

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