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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 17, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 17, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME or HISTORY UNO ARCHIVES DCS UOIHC5 A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS HOME EDITION ITTITTTI VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED F8ESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL WIBES MASON CITY IOWA WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 17 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 112 NAZIS PUSH YANKS BACK 18 Reds Harass Routed German Troops SOVIET ARMIES PRESS TOWARD DNIEPER RIVER Mounting Signs of German Withdrawals in North Are Seen By HARRISON SALISBURY United Press Correspondent The red army swept westward toward the Dnieper river Wed nesday harrying the Germans in their biRRest retreat ol the war The routed nazis were falling back from Kharkov the newest and richest soviet prize and along the sen of Azov with mounting signs that concerted withdrawals to the north miaht be forthcoming soon It appeared from the terrain lhat he nazis had slight chance lo halt for a firm stand at any position less 103 miles or so uest of Hie present fighting lines from Kharkov to the sea of Azov Military experts still were de bating whether the German fall back was due mostly lo strategic shortening of lines in preparations to face allied threats from the was a forced retreat un der the sledae hammer blows of Permit Officials to Kill Wild Life Damaging Farms Senate Passes Bill to Limit Advertising by Optical Firms powers similar to those or Gen Dwight D Eisenhower in North Africa and Gen Douglas MacAr thur in the South Pacific It seemed unlikely that the Afri can theater would be cleared up quickly enough to make available thc Iowa conservation that galaxy of British and Americomrmsison to destroy deer pheas nn mif iv ants and other wildlife aduirlfTpH the red army The swiftness of the German move westward seemed to indicate substantial planning and organ jzation Nevertheless there was no doubt the Germans were suffer ing constari heavy losses almost inevitable in even the best planned withdrawal The next firm stand by the Germans in the Kharkov area was not expected before PolJava 80 to 90 miles by highway to the west The Russians were barely 15 miles from Tasanrogr on the sea of Azov and the Germans were expected to pull out of Stalino and the remainder of he Donets Basin in short order to avoid entrapment While it was suggested generally that the Germans were pulling back o the Dnieper line the pos sibility was not excluded that they might go even farther to re duce their transport and supply strain to the minimum while add ing miles to the red armys burden of bringing up men munitions and food acoss the jvaged spaces Indications were that the Rus sians saw the possibility that the Germans were engaged in a vast swingaround to face the allies in western Europe One signs was a Moscow radio statement regard ing the approaching day when the Americans and British land and stay on the continent Possibly what is actually tak ing njace is a vast race between the Germans and the western allies to win a battle of prep arations before the opening of the battle of Europe In that connection it seemed reasonable to expect soon the ap pointment of a commanderm chief of the European front with progress As the German storm trooper defenders Were forced to fall back their flanks were constantly slashed by soviet cavalry tanks ski troopers and soldiers with rap idfire rifles No figures were given on Ger man losses in dead and prisoners but the dispatch noted German losses were tremendous Three deep rings of fortified lines were cracked by the red army before Kharkov fell Red Star said It was outflanked from the northwest then in an abrupt maneuver by troops directly un der the Ukrainian Major General Moskalenko The assault was pushed into the city The Germans apparently had expected the final assault to come from the east and had concen trated tanks and infantry forces in that sector operating with tanks s w e p around from the north toward thu west side of the city and con fronted nazi commanders with an other Stalingrad trap Moskalenkos first obstacle a storm troopheld position on Lagerna street in the north western outskirts He smashed through them and reached the district known as the Kholo dnaja mountain region Pouring down the slopes of the mountain the soviet troops reached Afanasievskaya street one of the main arteries of the city DES 3MO1NES bill to ermit the Iowa conservation ui uniiaii aiu fuucn can military stars for lilting the anft and olhei wildlife adjudged European post guilty of destroying property was Hard fighting was reported passed by the Iowa house and sent from Tunisia with Marshal Erwin CovBf Hickenlooper for his Rommel pressing against the signature Wednesday The vote southern sector in a bold bid to scramble the allied preparations for a decisive onslaught Reveal Maneuver Around Kharkov By EDDIE GILMOKE MpSCOW Star the official newspaper of thc trium phant red armies Wednesday de scribed the maneuver by which Kharkov Russias fourth largest city was reclaimed after nearly 16 months in German hands f The red army columns reached the walls of the city by dawn last Sunday with the German garrison half surrounded The tempo of our offensive was so excessive that the Germans had no time lo consolidate new lines Red Star Slid The German high command apparently was unready to admit the loss of Kharkov Its broadcast communique recorded by the As sociatedPress said heavy fighting was continuing In and near the city Earlier broadcasts evident ly preparing the people far bad news hadsaid preparations for Kharkovs evacuation were jignature was 94 to 4 Representative J R Hall R nialvern lold the house that the authority was necessary to cope with excess populations of deer in Boone coimty and pheasants in many northern Iowa counties particularly Winnebago Referring to the absence of large numbers of Iowa hunters now serving in the armed forces Hall said We arc short on good shots now They are going after the Japs and those hunters still at home are short on ammunition Thc bill would give the conser vation control for shooting or trapping any fish game fur bear ing animals and protected birds for the purpose of preventing the destruction or damage to private or public property After a lively discussion on the high cost of living the house passed and sent to the senate a bill to raise allowances paid to county sheriffs for prisoners meals The vote was 95 to 11 The ineasure would raise the al lowance per meal front 20 to 28 cents in counties under 40000 population and from 20 to 24 cents in counties from40000 to 80000 Boards of supervisors fi nance the cost of such meals by contract in counties above 80000 population Increases would ap ply during 1943 and 1944 Opposing the bill Representa tive George L Scott RWest Un ion said the sheriff has the best job in the county Up in our county when they retire practically without excep tion they buy a farm or farms PROHIBIT BAIT ADS BY OPTICAL FIRMS By a vote of 28 to 16 the Iowa senate Wednesday passed and sent the house a bill to prohibit the use of bait advertising by optical firms Senator E K Bekman ROt one of the sponsors of the measure said 21 states al ready have this type of legisla tion and that a similar measure BODIES OF 2 IN WATERLOO FIRE ARE RECOVERED 3rd Man Is Missing After Flash BW in Box Company Plant WATERLOO of two workmen who perished when fire leveled thp Flour City Box and Manufacturing company plant here Tuesday night were found in the charred ruins Wednesday morning and a search was hcing made for a third man who might not have escaped i X M F Blindman one of the plant owners estimated damage at 5100000 The plant he said was working 100 per cent on war orders supplying crating and boxes for ordnance plants in the midwest two of them at Burlington and Ankeny Coroner Sidney D Smith said the two bodies recovered Wednes day both burned beyond recogni tion were tentatively identified by clothing strips as those of John Noble 31 saw operator and Am brose Smith about 50 Martin Grosslein 58 plant engineer was listed as missing was last seen by fel low workmen as he telephoned the mm five department from a booth near Pliccs were sufficiently high at Ways to Fight Meat Black Mart Studied WASHINGTON sugges tion for government purchase of live animals andfor registration of every person who sells con trolled meal as a means to combat the black market in meat and keep small packers in business appeared to be gaining support Wednesday in the house small business com mittec David Ginsburg general coun sel for the office of price admin istration described the plan as worth considering after Chair man Patinan DTex asked whether it would not prove feas ible to accomplish the double ob jective The proposal was advanced Tuesday by Wilbur La Roe Jr counsel for the national indepen dent meat packers association who said the industry was suffer ing from government action in fixing ceilings on meat products but not on thc live animals A senate committee was told meanwhile lhat an OPA order freezing mill prices to farmers was the beginning of the bust up and breakdown of OPA and would make inevitable thc rafion ng of milk The testimony came rom Charles B llolman repre entjrig the milk producers fed eration Discussing the meat siluatipi farther before thc house group linsburg contended that ceiling Iowa here in the heart of the midwest has become a mecca for unscrupulous persons who would prostitute an honorable the front of the plant None of the workers could account for the fact that Noble failed to escape unless fie became lost in the heavy smoke and fell The ylant on limits was 280 feet long 85 feet wide and onestory high with concrete slab walls Its work floor was filled with sawing grooving and finishing machines all of them left worthless Two walls and the roof col lapsed shortly after thc flash blaze roared through the plant Two boxcars on siding at the rear of the plant were destroyed and a third was seriously dam Piles of lumber outside the plant were not reached by thc blaze al though most of the material stored in the plant was swept by flames Twenty men were reported at work when the fire was noticed sweeping across the ceiling On its three regular shifts the company had been employing 35 men Blindman said Operating the plant here are Meyer and Harry Blindman brothers Their father Frank of Minneapolis Minn is a part own er and operates another box plant in Minneapolis The loss was partly insured Blindman said tiii mjuyiitulK DURineSS and profession by using bait to C 1 lure to their doors thc imsuspectj OtaUS OPCeaV ing public Senator Bekman dc V J Bond Drive to Purchase Another Heavy Cruiser NAZIS armies are again fleeing westward to escape capture by Russian forces that have captured Ros tov Kharkov and Voroshilovgrad and other soviet armies sweeping around the cities Practically all the territory oc cupied by the Germans last summer now has been re taken Light arrows on this map indicate the route along which thc Germans arc retreating toward the Dnieper river clared Tuesdays vote was taken with comparatively little foren sic fireworks after a heated session Tuesday in which Sena tor Hugh W Lundy RAlbia successfully stalled off a roll call with a motion to adjourn The bill would prohibit any firm or person engaged in mer chandising eyeglasses to adver tise free professional service or examination or to offer any other special inducement such as re duced prices lowest prices or for a limited time only CANT AGREE IN RAIL DISPUTE Meditation Processes to Be Started Thursday CHICAGO negotia tions between representatives of railroads and 350000 members of five operating brotherhoods were terminated Wednesday without agreement and the services of the national railway mediation board were invoked jointly by both sides Mediation processes wilt be in stituted in Chicago Thursday Phil Otterbach a spokesman the carriers announced The union wage demands were for a 30 per cent pay increase or a minimum raise of S3 a day and filed the formal request with the carriers on Jan 25 CHICAGO B C h i c a g o launched a 40 million dollar bond selling campaign fast subscription was the speed the launching of another heavy cruiser to replace the sunken warship bearing the name of the nations second largest city The drive to sell enough bonds to build a new cruiser to replace the U S S Chicago which was sunk in the Solomon islands area last month was announced late Tues day Even before final plans for the campaign were completed pledges totaling 52000000 were received Weather Report Bar War Savings Bonds and fram yonr GlobeGazette carrier toy in temperature Wednesday aft crnoon Wednesday night and Thursday morning Lowes temperature Wednesday nigh in Mason City 8 IOWA Not much change in tem perature Wednesday night and Thursday forenoon MINNESOTA Warmer Wednes day night and Thursday fore noon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Tuesday 29 Minimum Tuesday night 7 At 8 a m Wednesday 7 The mercury failed to dip be low zero Tuesday night for the first night in 6 days YEAR AGO Maximum 25 Minimum 10 below RESCUED FROM 17 days in thc Idaho wilderness these two U S army sergeants were among thc five men rescued after their medium bomber made a forced landing on Loon lake There were eight men aboard when the plane came down Pictured are Staff Sgl Forest Hoover on slretclier and Staff Sgt Paul G Loewcn in the Gowen field hospital Boise Idaho he present time to allow a fai profit lo the major oulput of the packing industry If he added you seek to prices where it will covei the costs of efficient pro ducers then you have raised then beyond the point of stability NELSON MAY RESIGN POST Studies Suggestions of Friends to Retire WASHINGTON Donald M Nelson of the war pro duction board Wednesday pon dered suggestions both from friends and foes that he follow into retirement Ferdinand Eber stadt the vice chairman he dis missed Nelson toid friends he expected to take a week or two vacation to rest up to think about the pos sibility of retiring and also to give complete freedom to Charles E Wilson his new executive vice chairman who has taken over ail WPB activities If Nelson retires friends said he could legitimately base the ac tion on grounds of health because of fatigue and nervous strain E b c r s t a d t who Wednesday awaited army action on his bid for active duty in the field ar tillery was ousted Tuesday The move was acclaimed bv eight senators who issued a joint statement applauding the decision giving one man full control over and responsibility for war produc tion in all of its phases Senators Kilgore DW Va and Pepper advocates of legislation to set up an overall office of war mobilizalion were among the signers Eberstadt who has been ut odds with Wilson for weeks over con trol of VfpBs industry divisions asked his top lieutenants lo stay on and do their jobs Nevertheless one of them Fred Searls chief of WPBs facilities bureau handed in his resignation The bureau which passes on all construction projects was ordered to report to Wilson instead of lo Eberstadt two weeks ago along with six other important WPB cli F R Urges Super Tax on All Net Income Over Would Then Rescind Executive Orderof Pay Limit WASHINGTON Roosevelt Wednesday urged con gress to levy a special war super lax on all net income which aftcr paymcnt of regular income taxes would limit single persons to S25 000 a year and married couples to if such taxes were levied the president wrote Chairman pough on D N Car of the house ways and means committee I sliull immediately rescind the execu tive order by which the president limited wir time salaries to 25 000 after taxes This order applied only to sal aries the proposed super lax would apply lo incomefrom any source including presently tax exempt securities If the congress does not ap prove thc recommendation sub mitted by the treasury last June that a flat 100 per cent super tax be imposed on such excess in comes the president said then 1 hope the congress will provide a minimum tax of 50 per cent with MASON CITYNot much chanse SX WPB in temperature Wcdnesdav aft visionsTransfer of these seven di the jurtadic Steinkopf Says Allies id Wont Be Able to Beat Nazis in 1943 CHICAGO J Stein kopf who helped cover Germany for the Associated Press and watched the German armies fight expressed the opinion Wednesday that the united nations would not be able to defeat them in 1943 We may be able to knock out Italy this year Sleinkopf said in an address at a meeting of the In land Daily Press association But the fortress of Europe is a very real thing and I do not believe we will be able to crack it and defeat the Germans until 1944 steeply graduated rates as high as 90 pec cent The exact amount of thc ex emptions to be allowed and the exact rale of taxation to be ap plied are necessarily arbitrary and thescr are matters the congn must decide Mr Roosevelt expressed himself after the ways and means commit tee had voted 15 to 10 to repeal his salary limitation order by con gressional action and approved a bill by Reprcsonlatiie Disney D Okla to peg war time salaries over after laxes at their Pearl Harbor levels Disney has described Ihe execu tive order as government by the directive and Ihe repealer move ment has gathered support from a number of members of congress LES THREAT TO CUT ALLIED LINE IN MIDDLE IS SEEN Americans Fall Back in Tunisia With Heavy Loss of Men Vehicles lULLKTINr A I 1 1 K U HEADQUAIITESS IN NORTH AFKICA The United Stiles 12th air force an nounced Wednesday night that it had evacuated three of its air fields one at Sbeitla and two olhcrs at Thclcple near Feriana close lo the Tunisian Algerian border By ROGER GKEENH Associated Press War Editor Allied headquarters acknowl edged one of the gravest re verses t the Tunisian campaign Wednesday as bailiehardened Gorman tank forces ripped 18 miles through American lines and threatened to cut the allied front in the middle A commumimc said nazi col umns had driven to the out skirls of Sbeitla 38 miles from lie TunisianAlgerian frontier and were advancing on another town only 12 miles from the border Aflcitheir baptismal taslc of fire American lank forces rallied on Monday and hurled the Ger mans back six miles but fell back again Wednesday under heavy losses of men and armored ve hicles The German advance to he outskirts of Sbeitla 25 miles northwest of Sidi Bouzid and to ward Feriana marked a renewal of Marshal Rommels powerful offensive in southern Tunisia COLONEL SHANNON DIES SAN DIEGO Cal man who commanded thc Midway island ground forces at the de cisive battle of Midway Marine Colonel Harold D Shannon 50 of North Bergen N J died Tuesday ot pneumonia that developed after a surgical operation Colonel Shannon was born in Chicago The combined forces of the German LMsl and I Oth armored divisions using a number of the Germans huge new Mark VI tanks as well as old models sal vaged r r o m Libya punched through the American lines for the gain of nearly 18 miles in furious battles which raged from dawn to dusk The Paris radio said the Americans to the south of the Sidi Bouzid sector also were continu ing to retreat from the Gafsa area and were withdrawing in the di rection of Tozour on the north bank of the Ciiott Djerid In three days Marshal Rommel had thus far smashed forward for a total gain of about 35 miles west ot Paid Pass and the allies were beingpressed back almost to the Algerian frontier with American tenure of Sbeitla 100 miles from the east coast extreme ly uncertain Colonel Ulm meanwhile pushed northwestward with a German column from Gafsa in the south toward Fcriana IB miles distant R Nv the bnnl of an assault bv Field Marshal Romrnel K veteran Afnka Korps which has struck westward at the Paid pass in ward to fll CM wcmy units have succeeded in pushing for the lit k Amcncan armored forcc3 artillery and infantrv fought   

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