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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, February 11, 1943 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - February 11, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME E P A miENT o HISTORY AHCHI YCJ I A VOL XLIX THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES AU NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS 11 HOME EDITION imnri THIS PAPER CONSISTSOP TWO SECTIONS jm ONE NQ 107 ALLIES PLAN HUGE DRIVE ON ENEMY SIGNS BILL TO CUT IOWA PAY TAXES IN HALF Hickenlooper Completes Action on Reducing State Income Levy DBS MOINES Bourke B Hickenlooper said he had signed Thursday the bill providing for a 50 per cent cut in the per sonal income taxes lowans will pay this year and in 1344 if action signing t bill into law came less than 24 hours after the house ap proved the measure designed to save Iowa residents approxi mately a year in state income taxes during the next two years The income bill was ihe major piece of legislation to be come law nnd also was the first of the governors major recom mendations to be enacted bv the legislature Thebill does not affect corpora tion income taxes Final legislative action on the measure came late Wednesday when the house after voting down six amendments voted the 50 per cent reduction by a 100 to 8 count The senate bad passed the identical bill 47 to 0 last Monday There were seven hours of de amendments but virtu allyhodiscussion on the bill it Hottest arguments flared in the discussion of an amendment by Representative W p Knowlton His amendment provided that lowans pay the full personal income tax due in 1943 and 1944 but receive a credit cer tificate for 50 per cent of their payment After two hours of debate in which approximately 25 rcpre s cut a lives participated the i amendments which would have permitted persons owning real or personal property to obtain credit an the amount of the certificate on property taxes they must pay in 1SM4 and 1945 was defeated 6fi to 44 Knowlton denied any connec tion between his amendment and ihe Iowa Farm Bureau fed eration The Knowllon amend ment however followed virtu ally the same program which Farm Bureau President Francis Johnson said was favored by a majority of his organization Opponents of the Knowlton amendment declared it was un fair and discriminatory The eight votes against the 50 per cent reduction bill were cost by Representatives A H Avery R Edwin GeUchcr R Elmer Pieper R Paul Troeger R Ot Brede Wamstad R T H Huston R Craw F A Latchaw R Wilton Junction and Knowlton The state tax commission an nounced that if thebill becomes Jaw rebates will be sent to those who have paid taxes normally due this year Many lowans however were a bit ahead of the commission More than n thousand persons have riled their returns on the liasis of the 50 per cent reduc tion Meet Chiang KaiShek and Agree on Offensive Plans While the house was busy with ils tax bill the senate committee on income tax reduction advanced two more income tax relief bills to the calendar One by Senator A J Shaw R Pocahontas would allow state in come taxpayers the same deduc tion from gross income for unusual medical expenses allowed by the federal government The federal deduction is any expenditure above five per cent of net income The other by Senator Ross R Mowry R Newton would elim inate the requirement for having slate returns notarized a pro cedure dropped by the federal government this year Allies Kill 800 Japs in 6 Mile Advance on Base of Salamaua By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A concerted united nations of fensive against Japan was fdre shadowed Thursday with the of ficial disclosure that highrank i n g American British and Chi n e s e military 1 Cfiders have met and agreed on offensive plans against J a pans f a i flung invasion armies The British government an n o u n c e d in CHIANG London that Field Marshal Sir John Dili representing Prime Minister Churchill and LtGen Henry H Arnold representing President Roosevelt had held a series of conferences with Chinas Generalissimo Chiang KaiShek in Chungking and with Field Mar shal Sir Archibald P Wavell in India A British communique said the fullest possible coordination would be insured by subsequent conferences between Marshal Wavell and Gen Douglas McAr thur allied Commanderinchief in the southwest Pacific Prime Minister Churchill told parliament in London that Gen Chiang had expressed satisfaction additional help that be provided lop China at this stage of her Jongdrawn un daunted struggle7 ALLIES KILL 800 IX DRIVE TOWARD SALAMAUA Amid this augury of heavier united nations blows to be deliv ered against the Japanese patches from the New Guinea but tlcfront reported that allied troop had killed nearly 800 Japanese i a 13day drive toward the big one my base at Salamaua General MacArthurs head quarters said the allies in a sud den display of offensive power had thrown the main Japanese force back six miles toward Sal amaua killine 125 of the enemy Front reports said that wha started out as a surprise Japanes tne allied air field a Wau 3D miles southwest of Sal amaua was turned into a victorj for Australian infantry and artil lery flown to the jungle scene bi American pilots in army transpor planes After routing the enemy iln Australians pushed on six mile beyond Wau and captured Wan dumi V S BOMBERS BLAST AT JAPS IX KISKA Meanwhile a navy communique reported heavy American aeria assaults on Japanese bases over vast Pacific area from the Aleu tian islands to the South seas The navy said U S heavy ana medium bombers Thursday blastec Japanese positions on Kiska in the Aleutians scoring many Other American warplanes pounded ti onemy base at Munda in the Solomons in two attacks by night and day Japanese forces on Guadal HICKENLOOPER TO TALK DES JIOINES Bourke B Hickenlooper left by train Thursday afternoon for Ok lahoma City Okla where lie is scheduled to deliver a principal address at the dinner given by the Lincoln club of Oklahoma Friday night uaa canal have ceased all organized re sistance the communique said confirming previous reports and lokios own admission that Japa nese troops had given up the fight for the nrize island On the Burma front British headquarters reported that RVF planes carried out widespread al tacks against the Japanese Wed nesday blasting storehouses river steamcis and rail communications in a 200mile sweep through the Irrawaddy river valley Other RAF planes bombed the vicinity of Akyab big Japanese base on the bay of Bengal and e n u Positions in the athedaung sector 25 miles north of Akyab Crippled Boy Shows Unusual Ability for Building Model Planes TEANECK N J CUFflEero Koskmen 16 who has been crip pled since he was five by infantile paralysis left school at the re quest of the navy Thursday be cause of his unusual ability in building model airplanes His work in the navy will bo experimental and secret BRITISH FORCES FIGHT NAZIS IN TUNISIAN DRIVE Report Germans Are Starting Evacuation of Kharkov Key City By ROGER GREENE Associated Fress War Editor British headquarters reported Thursday that vanguards of Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys Brit ish 8th army clashed with axis troops in the Ben Gardane sector 25 miles inside Tunisia while the Germancontrolled Vichy radio asserted that the British had failed m two attempts to break through axis lines Without confirmation else where the Vichy broadcast de clared that Field Marshal Erwin Rommels forces had driven the British 8th army back into Tri poli ania Gen Sir Jlarold R L G Alex ander British commander in chief in the middle east disclosed Wednesday that theBth array had started a new drive into Tunisia surging across the frontier toward the Mareth line 60 miles inside Tunisia Thursdays British communique reported artilleiy duels with the axis in the Ben Gardane sector on the Tunisian coastal road and said British patrols farther inland were attacking the enemy Plight of Germans Becomes Blacker As he north African conflict flamed toward a showdown the plight of Adolf Hitlers invasion armies in Russia grew ever black er Hershey Opposes Effort to Defer Men Witii Children Says That Group Will Supply Most Inductees xin Next 2 or 3 Months The great German base at Kharkov pop 833000 ap peared acutely menaced as the red armies stormed within 22 miles of the city and Stockholm reports said the nazis were al ready evacuating the key steel center Stockholm heard that Russian SHOCK troops were attacking with in six to 10 miles of the city while the red armys Ijig sise guns rained destruction on the German garrison V A S H I N GT ON General Lewis B Hershey Thurs day opposed legislation to require deferment of men with children until all single men and childless married men are drafted and saicl great majority of men in ducted in the next two or three months would be men with chil dren Without giving any figures director of selective service said he had previously testified lhat a loweringof the draft age to 18 which was done would not meet the demands of the armed forces for manpower and added In the next two or three soviet dispatches indi cated that the nazi defense system was crumbling with the Russian striking along a 50mile arc and routing tankled German attempts o check the assault A late bulletin from red army leadquarters said Russian spear leads were driving toward Khar KOV from three uyev 22 miles southeast the Ukraine Pcchenegi 30 miles east and Volchansk 36 miles northeast At the same time other swift moyinp 50Tlet columns were re ported tightening he sicse 230000 German troops and their satellites at Rostov cuUins across the Moscowto Kostov railway below Novocher kassk 18 miles northeast of the city and fighting Iheir way into a senes of strong nail fortifica tions BUnS On tlle hoie of the Don kept the German bastion under a continuous fire Below Rostov another 200000 xis troops were being steadily driven toward the sea and the Russian high command announced a r Azovfrom the Don liver to n f n completely leared of the enemy Farther down the coast a Rome broadcast re ported the Russians landed fresh reinforcements in the No vorossisk region in a move to cut off any German attempt to K J the icecovered Kerch Strait to the Crimea VT ui mice months the great majority of men inducted will be men with chil dren because there will be no one else left I feel that It would be unwise o enact this legislation saic Hershey first witness called ir house military committee hearing on a bill to set up four categoric for induction and to put the draft ing of men on a state wide in stead of a local board basis In ils present form it would render administration of selective service very difficult Hershey testified adding lhat while some changes might be made to elimi nate my objections he feels the legislation still would be unde sirable The inevitable tendency of manpower procurement durin the next eight or nine months or even the next two or three months Hershey said must give more weight lo what the registrnni is doing rather than to the relation he has with dependents He emphasized that he was ex pressing only my personal opin rejected for physical defects by local boards he siid the rate ol rejections at induction centers ran 30 to 35 per cent In most cases he explained vejections were caused by defective teeth or bad eyesight although the standards had been lowered considerably i Were not rejecting them but n the army is rejecting them he added FR WILL TALK FRIDAY NIGHT Will Speak on Foreign Home Front Subjects ion and was not speaking for ng the war manpower commission Hershey submitted figures to back up his assertion that it was necessary to make heavy inroads upon men with children The total available manpower pool including those already in service he said was 22000000 of which not Jess than 8000000 must be disregarded because of dis ability Of the 14000000 remain cxplained an estimate of 11000000 for the armed services by the end of this year was about asgood as you can get He said that approximately 1500000 must be deferred because of needs of agriculture On that basis Hershey said II out of 14 of all the men be tween lhe ases of 18 and 38 must be in the service by the end of this year and that meant use of many men with chil dren While only from eight lo ten per cent of men ol all ages were When he said the rale of rejec tions m the J8 year old group was from 20 to 25 per cent Represenl tative Thomason D Tex com mented that is a sad commentary on health conditions Ihrouiiout the country Hershey testified that before the endof this year the great m jonty of all men between 18 and J8 who are physically fit regard w ther or their dependency must enter tlic serv You mean the military serv ice asked Thomason Yes Hershey replied Iowa Senate Confirms Appointments Made by Governor Hickenlooper DES MOINES Iowa senate Thursday confirmed seven appointments by Gov Bourke B Hickenlooper They were Board of H Plock republican Burlington W tar i republican Mason Lester S Gillette democrat Fostona Conservation n I M Parkcrrepublican JJcs Moincs and Frank W Matles democrat Odeboldt Board of F Hopkins democrat Mason Ciiy Employment security WASHINGTON WjTlie white house announced Thursday that President Roosevelt would make a IC radio beginnin8 at central war time Fri day night in which he will discuss many subjects concerned with tlic foreign and home fronts Tiie chief executive also will speak on Washingtons birthday reb 22 addressing the George Washington dinners under the auspices of the democratic na tional committee The hour of this address was not announced The Lincoln day speech Friday night will be broadcast on all radio networks It will be the presidents first speech to the country since his return from the Casablanca con ference He is expected to touch not only on hat meeting but on ma n y domestic developments which have taken place since in cluding the new W hour work week order Reveals Allies Have Landed Half Million Men in North Africa I O M n O V A nT E Tim i H Pnmc Minister dunchill declared Thursday that the allies had landed nearly ahalfmillion men in Ainea and planned an offensive campaign during the next Miths with the goal of engaging the enemy the possible scale and at the earliest possible moment i TCW Vlbnmt his usual fighting spirit encc the news of a new unification of command in North Africa aiicl pledge that Europe would be invaded as soon us the united na tions were ready These were highpoints of his address to the cheering house oC commons 1 As the British eighth army moves into Tunisia tile North African command is unified under lhe American commander Lieut Gen Divight D Eisenhower with Gen Sir rhirold Alexander sec ond in command and with Medi terranean tiir forces under British Air Vice Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder and sea forces under Ad miral ijir Andrew Browne Cun ningham O The allies arc more than hold ing their own in the Uboat WASHINGTON Roosevelt Thursday nomiuiteii Lieutenant General Dwiahl D Eisenhower to be a full genera comciclent with Prime Minister Churchill s disclosure that allied forces opposing the axis in North Africa would be unified under Eisenhowers command The promotion expected to re ceive prompt approval by the senate will make Eisenhower the EISENHOWER IS NAMED TO BE FULL GENERAL British Force Entering Tunisia to Be Under Command of American Sweden Checks Nazi Travelers Each Day STOCKHOLM Swed ish government has instituted a daily instead of a monthly check on the number of German soldiers crossing Sweden to and from Nor way authoritative sources snid Thursday The purpose of the more frequent check it was un derstood was to prevent a sudden reinforcement of German garri sons in case of an emergency Toledo Carl B Stigcr democrat rf i nmcns and all those named were being reappomted excepting Stigcr a former state supreme court jus tice who succeeds Peter J democrat of Dubuque Matles who succeeds the late R E Garberson of Sibley and Gillette who suc ceeds Thomas W Keenan demo crat of Shenandoah The senate Thursday also passed six bills including a bill previ ously passed by the house to per Tiit the reduction of the fat con tent m ice cream as a war emerg ency measure Another bill passed by the sen ate and sent the house would au honze the state conservation ommission to license persons to take and sell beaver KILLED AT CAMP SHELBY SIOUX RAPIDS to TLarson 25 of Sioux Rap ds was killed in an automobile accident at Camp Shelby Miss Wednesday Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued cold Thursday afternoon and Thurs day night lowest temperatures Thursday nigh Warmer Friday forenoon IOWA Warmer Thursday night and Friday forenoon except con tinued rather cold cast portion Thursday night MINNESOTA Not so cold Thurs day night warmer Friday fore noon occasional light snow west portion Friday forenoon and extreme northwest portion Thursday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday i Minimum Wednesday night A At 8 a m Wednesday 4 Snow i inch PrccP 04 inch YEAR AGO Maximum S Minimum JQ Precipitation Trace fourth full general in tlic Ameri can forces counting General John J Pershing commander of the first AEF in Europe who has been accorded tliit rank for life The others arc George C Mar shall army chief of staff and Douglas MiltArthur in command in lhe Australian area Wide Command Is Given American LONDON Minister Churchill told the house of com mons Thursday that as the British eighth army passes into the Ameri can sphere in Tunisia it would come under Ihe orders of General Eisenhower the American com mander with Gen Sir Harold Alexander as his deputy Besides Alexander hitherto British middle east commander as deputy commander in chief these officers also will be under Eisen hower Air Vice Marsha Sir Arthur Tedder air commander in chief for the Mediterranean area and re sponsible to Eisenhower for air operatipns in this theater Admiral of he Fleet Sir Andrew Browne Cunningham commander of the U S and British fleets in Eisenhowers heater Air Vice Marshal Arthur Cnn ngham in active charge of air op eration supporting allied forces in Tunisia Alexander with a wealth of ex perience fighting the Germans and Italians is seen as the logical chojcc to direct land operations Eisenhower and Alexander both arc young and energetic command ers who favor direct action Both arc impatient with red tape and those who know both arc con vinced they will make an excellent team Given Stars of British Strength ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH AFRICA General Dwight D Eisenhower allied commander in chief in the north African theater commented Thursday on his new command that I consider that I have been given the stars so fir as I know them of B r i t a i ns military strength I He was referring to the ap pointments of General Sir Harold Alexander to be his deputy com mander in chief Admiral Sir An drew Browne Cunningham to command naval operations and Air Vice Marshal Sir Arthur Ted der to be air commander in chief in the Mediterranean zone IOWAX FATALLY HURT PASADENA Cal vPiCoip ted R Clausen 33 Centcrvillc Iowa who was struck by an auto mobile last Monday dice Wednes day night warfare with a million and n quarter more tons of shipping available now than six months with loKses of the pasi two months at the lowest figure in over a year and with the best rate of Uboat sinkings so far in the war 3 Churchill will meet again with President RousevcH withiniiic next nine months The prime minister ciisclusetl thai Uic presi dent had been willing to go as far as Khartoum Egypt to bring Premier Stalin into the January conferences but that Stalin was tou engaged with Russias mighty winter drive to leave his country ieven for a day A British Fidel Marshal Sir John Dill and American Lieut Gen Henry II Arnold have conferred nt Chungking with Generalissimo Chiang KaiShek who expressed satisfaction at the plans for giv ing China additional help r Britain has offcncd tu embody into a special treaty her pledge lo help carry the way against Japan on to unconditional surrender but had President Roosevelts answer that the word of Britain was ciuile enough for him Churchills speech emphasized that the allies were preparing lo strike He declared lhat the united na tions had a complete plan of ac tion o be carried out during the next nine months1 f V Churchill received with loud 1liccrf siil dominating IKE EISENHOWER General Aow   

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