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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: January 26, 1943 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - January 26, 1943, Mason City, Iowa                                NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COMP DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY A NO ARCHIVE i 5 W 0 I t 3 I A THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES CIVF CENTS A COPX MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY JANUARY 26 1943 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 93 Announcement From Allied Leaders Awaited GEN HANFORD MacNIDER Oak Leaf Cluster Added to Medals Given to MacNider ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN AUSTRALIA Gen Douglas MacArtluir awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster ia iiet of the Distinguished Service Cross Tuesday to Brig Gen Hanford MacNider of Mason City for extraordinary heroism in ac tion near Cape Endaiadere New Guinea Nov 23 His citation said that while within a few yards of the front lineobserving the disposition of infantry units for an Impending attack General MacNider saw position While rally tag this group he received numerous wounds from frag ments when an enemy grenade exploded 1 The citation added that his courageous personal example of coolness under fire and fortitude afterHeing wounded were an in spiration to men under his com mand The Distinguished Service Cross was awarded him in the first tim war when he was a cap tain for extraordinary heroism in action at St Rlihiel France while serving with the ninth United States infantry An Oak Leaf Cluster equiva lent to the second award of the Distinguished Service Cross was heroism in action a short later atBlanc Mont He also was awarded the Sil ver Star decoration and two Oak Leaf Clusters denoting three citations for gallantry in action during his service with the American army in France He also has received the Purpli Heart and an OakLeaf Cluster t that decoration Use of County Funds to Aid Bond Sales Is Hotly Debated Measure Is Passed by Iowa Senate 2913 Following Debate DES MOINES first time this session a bill ran into serious opposition in the Iowa senate Tuesday when the cham ber took up the proposal to pay county war bond sales campaign expenses out of county funds The bill which originated in the house passed by a vote of 29 iff 13 and now goes back to the house for a concurrence in senate amendments Senator Frank C Byors R Cedar Rapids pointed out that his home city was the first in the country to receive the United States treasury award for suc cess of its war bond campaign And we did it with entirely volunteer help he declared Senator C V Lindlay R Fort Dodge added it seems to me we are putting a pretty low esti mate on patriotism here Those voting against the bill Harlan C Foster R Mi Pleas G R Hill R R V Leo R Frank D Martin R Frank Pelzcr R F J1 Pine R Columbus Junction Edwin C Schluter R Paul P Stewart R Deverc Watson R Council Bluffs and Sanford Zeigler Jr R Fair The bill provides for payment of office expenses only and does not cover the transportation expense of war bond campaign workers The senate passed 17 bills Tuesday to set a record for the upper house so far this session The house of representatives at the same time established a record for brevity when it met passed one only one on the adjourned for the day in 20 minutes The house passed a bill appro priating SllOOn to the state di vision of vital statistics to carry the department until June 30 when the new appropriation will be available It was the first appro priation measure passed this scs sion by either house Bills passed by the senate Tues day morning included a measur to authorize park commissionei in special charier cities to increas the playground maintenance lev from onehalf to one mill for rec reationnl programs and another 1 authorize special charter cities t levy threeeighths of a mill par tax already provided for secon cities with 200 or more acres parks Both bills arc of special in tercst to the city of Davenport an were sponsored by Senator Fran D Martin RDavenport Among bills introduced in th senate Tuesday was one by Semi tor A E Augustine DOskaloo sa to raise the ceiling on oldag pension benefits from a monl to S40 a month MARSEILLES FIGHTS NAZIS Order Probe of Charges by Jeffers SEE STORY OX PAGE 2 WASHINGTON inves gation into Rubber Administra or William Jeffers charges that army and navy loafers were in crfering with war production was rdcred Tuesday by the house aval committee The action was taken at the request of Chairman Vinson DGa after he read to the committee a newspaper story of Jeffers remarks before the council of state governors at Baltimore This is a serious accusation nd we should have an inquiry to ive Mi Jeffers an opportunity to jrove the correctness of his state ment We should also hear from rmy and navy officials Vinson aid It was apparently up to Presi ent Roosevelt to call the winner n the sharp skirmishing between effers and the armed services on vhether Jeffers should get the overriding priority goahead he demands for his synthetic rubber jrogram The question is known to have jeen in the hands of James F Jyrnes director of economic sta jilization for about two weeks but informed sources said intense military pressure had been ap lied and the final decision would lave to come from Mr Roosevelt limself These official sources who cannot be quoted said army and navy heads had furnished a joint memorandum AoBjmies setting forth their claims Brieflythese are that the special priority di rector sought by Jelfers would interfere with three other must Drograms Aviation gasoline chemical warfare plants and nav al escort vessels The intensity of the conflict was brought into the open Mon day by Jeffers denunciation of what he called army and navy interference with war pro duction The country will get production he told a session of the council of state govern ments in Baltimore if we keep the army and navy and loafers out of these plants There are too many experts in these plants army and navy men Jeffers said One day it the navy and the next its the army Its a battle between many stars and how many bars This blunt talk got a round o applause in Baltimore but drew a reprimand from the office o war information in Washington which is supposed to clear am approve all speeches by public of ficials to head off interagenc strife Use Gummed Tape to Hold Up Stockings LUBBOCK T e x i r civilian employes of the Sout Plains army flying school have de vised a new use for gummed pa per tape They use it to hold up their stockings REDSPUSHONIN CAUCASUS AND UKRAINE LINES Spurred by Stalins Order to Rout Foe Beyond Russian Borders By EDDY GILMORE MOSCOW on by an nder of the day in which Premier Stalin for the first time signed limself supreme commander of he red army Russias fighting orces pushed their battle lines ihead in the Ukraine and the Cau asus Tuesday and battled against rowing German resistance in the ower Don approaches to Rostov Forward for the routing of the erman invaders and their cx ilsion over the boundaries of our motherland was the Pre niers rallying 017 if 9 It was recalled lhat his words not a step backward rang out over the defense of Stalingrad in its darkest hour last fall and from that time on the defenders of the battered city braced and held The premiers praise of his troops commanders and workers was contained in an order of the day broadcast by the Moscow radio at a time when Russias armies were forging ahead on ev ery front from Leningrad to the Caucasus Stalin declared that the red Report Agreement Reached Allied Forces by De Gaulle and Giraud Move Against Axis in Africa miles in two months of their sec ond winter offensive routing 102 enemy divisions and capturing 200000 prisoners Our troops have won an im portant victory he said and he added The offensive ot our troops continues It may be hard to realize out side the soviet union what effect a pronouncement of Stalin has It sweeps over fliis vast country by radio and newspapers and spreads through cities by word of mouth His order of the day followed special and regular communi ques which reported the recap ture of all of Voronezh from the Germans who had held a west ern section of the city since the summer of 1912 and which an nounced new gains in the Cau casus and the drive southwest of Voronezh toward the German base at Kharkov The Russians reported the cap ture of Belaya Glina 40 miles from the Tikhokretsk rail junc ture which is 90 miles south o Rostov The Germans were said to be tightening the defenses and resist ing fiercely as the Russian squeezed in on Piostov from thi section of the north Caucasus down the Don from the cast anc down the rail line across the Don ets bend from the north A midclay communique re ported the recapture of mon towns in the Voronezh section I along the southern front and in the Caucasus but these were no I immediately identified by name ILOPS INTO couple of the members of Ihc crew of a big army trans port pteiie pull away from it in a rowboat as it lays halfsubmerged in trie Potomac river near Boiling field Washington Six army officers aboard the big plane escaped with just minor bruises The destination of the transport was not revealed GEV HENRI GIRAUD GEV CHARLES DE GAULLE LONDON Charles De Gaulle Fighting French leader nd General Henri Honore Giraud high commissioner in French North Africa were reported Tuesday to have reached an agreement as i csult of mediation by the Editors note Here a portion of MCDPIIDV DCOIMQ he dispatch was eliminated by j I ULUlllO Talks were understood to be iart of farreaching warwinning plans of the allied nations Military leaders of the United tales and Britain it was reported clayed a part in the talks Fighting French sources here had maintained for weeks that iny disagreements could be quiek y ironed out it representatives of he two French factions met The principal barrier between the DC Gaulle and Giraud camps has been the Fighting Freneli charges that Vichy men had not been eliminated entirely from DC Gaulle and Giraud them selves were always understood to have a high regard for each other Withthe time approaching for ihc final showdown in the battle to drive the axis out of north Af rica some quarters had expressed fears that a split in French fac tions would create a serious situ ation French fighting units which have been active under dual leadership are counted on to play an even more important part under the agreement it was said details of which were not available The United States is rushing modern equipment to the French troops most of whom are hard ened and rock trained but who have been handicapped because of outmoded weapons SLOWLY RISING Weather Forecast Is Cheered by lovvans DES MOINES ris ing temperature Tuesday anc Tuesday night That was the welcome forecasi from the weather bureau Tuesday morning following another nigh of intense cold throughout most o the state The temperature dropped to 16 be low at Mason Other marks Dubuquc 14 Cedar Bap ids and Spencer 2 Iowa City 10 Fort Dodge 8 Davenport and La nioni 7 Ames Burlington anc Sioux City 4 and DCS Moincs 0 There was no precipitation clur ing the last 24 hours the weathci bureau said INTERESTED IN SOYBEANS KANSAS CITY city library reports a sudden rush for books about soybeans Theres a story around town librarians said that you can make coffee out of em Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Not so cold TUBS dny afternoon and Tuesda night Warmer Wednesday fore noon Lowest temperatures Tuesday in Mason City 2 below IOWA Not so cold Tuesday night and Wednesday forenoon MINNESOTA Not so cold Tues day night warmer Wednesday forenoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday o Minimum Monday night IB At 8 a m Tuesday 15 YEAR AGO Maximum 47 Minimum 24 By ROGER GREENE Associated Press War Editor A flame of open revolt in France risis in North Africa and ever lackening defeat in Russia ormed the composite picture onfrpnting Adolf Hitler and lis atcllites in World war II Tues ay y At the same lime the behind thescenes atmosphere was rife with signs of momentous events in the makine on the part of united nations leaders perhaps leading the way for the long awaited invasion of Hitlers European fortress in the com ing weeks or months w Censored dispatches from Lon don said farreaching war plans of the allied nations were taking shape and reported that is phase of the talks an agreement over the North African poUlica squabble had been reached by en Charles de Gaulle and Gei Henri Honore Giraud following mediation by the United States and Britain Details of the agreement were not immediately disclosed SHARPENING PRESSURE IS PUT ON NORTH AFRICA On the northern shores of th dark continent the axis faced sharpening pressure from boll sides as the victorious British Sit army swept on past Tripoli en route to Tunisia and Americai troops boldly accepting a na challenge smashed through axi lines in a raid to a point only 3 Aflied Statement to Be Given Out at 9 p m Tuesday By THE ASSOCIATED TRESS An important announcement Is expected tu be made public at 9 p m central war lime Tues day night No indication of its nature can be given at present Emotional Outbursts When Tripoli Fell Are Described 16000 Jews Liberated 1 When British Forces Advanced Into City Bj DON WIHTEHEAD AND GEORGE TUCKER TRIPOLI Jan 23 people liberated from virtual bondage and watching theiremolional outbursts form the most graphic impressions we have of the occupation of Tripoli Only a few hours ago British troops and advance units of the royal air force rolled into this city and the official surrender to Sir Bernard L Montgomery wrote the last chapter in the fall of Mussolinis African empire Touring the city we visited Tripolis ancient ghetto where some 16000 Jews were crowded into a labyrinth of houses and cel lars resembling a rabbit warren We walked through an arched gate guarded by military police and as soon as the people recog nized us as Americans the emo tional outburst was almost riotous Some threw themselves at our feet offering gifts of not only wine and tobacco but money as well Men hrew heir arms about our necks and kissed our cheeks Women kissed our hands Chil dren clun Io our legs and kissed our dusty shoes They showed us photographs of President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill with cries Full reports will be carried over KG1O at 9 p m Tuesday in a special CBS newscast and in Wednesdays editions of the GlobeGazette FRENCH HOMES BARRICADED IN OPEN REVOLTS Germans Threaten to Devastate Area Unless Resistance Is Ended BULLETIN LONDON quot ing a dispatch published by a Swiss newspaper reported Tuesday that 170 men aud 80 women have been shot at Mar seille where a slate of siege was imposed after angry Frenchmen fired on German soldiers The dispatch in the Journal De Geneve implied that the 250 persons were shot as violators of the Vichyordered state of siege under which anyone entering the forbidden zone of the old port area of Marseille was liable to execution LONDON army authorities massing tanks field guns and infantry against French Tien defending their barricaded lomes in the old harbor district of Marseilles were reported Tues day to have threatened to devas utc the entire area unless rcsis ancc ceased The residents were battling nazi to uproot and move them elsewhere Vichy disclosed that it had imposed martial law in the dis trict to aid the Germans and said that evacuated persons who relumed or others classed as looters would be liable io Ihe death penally by French court martial Fighting French headquarters icard that fighting had been going on since Monday morning and that many Frenchmen and women had been killed The Fighting French expressed fear that loss of life in the old crowded district might be appal ing but said they did not expect definite news through their se cret channels for 48 hours They added that they believed the Ger mans would direct their field ar tillery at the barricaded homes only as a last resort Whole streets of tumbledown houses in the old harbor district were reported to have been con verted into forts by household ers and that residents including tiic famous Apache toughs were Unas at the Germans with rifles and pistols Unconfirmed reports were re ceived lhat German machine guns now surrounded the area ready to pick off any who ventured from their homcs under escort of the Germans or Vichy police Dispatches from Switzerland and other points bordering France said fighting started when Ger man troops led by agents of the Viva America Viva Inglisi They produced skimpy loaves of bread less than six inches long the ration for two persons a clay A husky young fellow suddenly tool us by the arms and shoved us through the crowds into n courtyard and down a flisht of dark steps into a room where a whiterobed patriarch sat at a bare table A torrent of people crowded after us hundreds clamoring for aclmittancc until the doors were barred They told us that a few hours before Ihe troops entered the city some leading Jewish mar chants had been drassed from their shops and shot but they expressed no surprise al this because they said it was the kind of thinj that had been JTO injt on since the days when the city was the seat of Mediter ranean piracy In this city of 102000 only 35 000 are Italians mostly newcom ers There are 16000 Jews and the remainder are Arabs You simply cannot grasp the effects that this victory had on the people until you try to wade through the street with little children clinging to your feet and beseeching you not for material things but for a word or a smile of comfort I The first the populace knew of Tripolis fall was when British armored cars and tanks rumbled through the streets this morn miles from the Tunisian coasta road They captured 80 prisoners A bulletin from British head quarters said Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerys 8th arm scored new gains Monday ii pursuit of Nazi Field Marsha Edwin Rommels forces and uc cupicd the town of Zauia 30 miles west of Tripoli While the bulk of Rommels 1 gions apparently had retreated ii to Tunisia and joined the axis Ti nisian forces commanded by Col Gen Jurgcn von Arnim axis vea guards were reported slill filtoiir through Zuara 05 miles west Tripoli under violent bombii and machinegunning assault allied warplanes Simultaneously Fighting Frenc headquarters announced lhat Sesiapo tlle nazi secret police Gen Jacques Le Clercs columns and Vlclly Police sought forcibly to had entered Tripoli after a 1200 mile drive across the Sahara des ert from Lake Chad in the heart of equatorial Africa On the west flank of the two way allied squeeze move ment other French troops un der General Giraud were re ported to have thrown hack German attacks in the moun tains around Ousscltia 65 miles below Tunis A French communique said General Girauds soldiers halted the nazis and then with the arri val of U S armored troops strengthened their hold north and northeast of Ousseltia United nations headquarters re ported briefly that our forces continued to operate toward the north in Ousseltia valley and said heavy rains again bogged down the campaign Without confirmation from al lied sources an Italian communi que asserted that in the period of Jan 1824 the allies lost more than 4000 prisoners 13 tanks cap tured or destroyed 70 guns and 200 motor transports in Tunisia An enemy attack against a po sition conquered by our Iroops was repulsed Ihe Italian com munique said remove all residents normally 45000 from the harbor area At once residents started to barricade streets and fortify houses dispatches said and snip ers opcnod fire from rooftops and windows Resistance became so serious dispatches said that the Germans called for tanks field artillery and infantry reinforcements Dispatches reported thai many houses were under siege and here were reports also lhal isolated parties of German infantrymen and gcstapo agents were themselves under siege in some sections Reliable informants in Madrid reported that the greatest strike since the war started had broken out in the big Luxembourg steel and iron works which have been of enormous value to German war industry It was said that workers struck suddenly Saturday morning and left the factories The Germans impressed others into service but the substitutes sat down before their machines in a sitdown strike Hundreds of workers were ar rested Madrid said but the strike The daring American tlirust to continued despite German at ward the Gulf of Gabes coast apj tempts to convince the factory parently a small operation to test j men and women to return Die vulnerability of the axis coastj The strike aside from the hatred al corridor was made after Gcr of Luxcmbourgers for their Ger man planes dropped ii note ask man oppressors was due to anger no vivxt nj tillKd ing don t he Americans over all their pvoductioii eoins rnmo rint 1 tn i to Gcimany to longer working come out and fig   

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