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Mason City Globe Gazette: Thursday, November 26, 1942 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 26, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPtR EDITED FOR THE HOME DEPART ME NT Of H I 5 T 0 3 y A NO OES MQINES I A COM VOL XLIX THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPV AP Features These are the fates of crosssection or the 130000000 rich and poor lucky and unfortunate who gathered for the Thanksgiving feast And above is the face of niDleagris a It o p a v o who represented the millions of succulent gob blers who graced the festive board EHffiffll Restrict Liquor Sales to Servicemen in West SAN FRANCISCO The army and navy will restrict li quor purchases by all servicemen in eight western states The new ruling issued by Lieut Gen J L DeWitt the western defense command becomes effective Dec 10 Soldiers and sailors may buy drinks at bars in tho eight states only between 5 p m ana mid night and at liquor stores only between 5 p m and a p m Beet is not included MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY NOVEMBER 26 1942 THIS JAPEit CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 41 REDS SPEED UP ADVANCE fleeing Nazis Clog Roads Russians Open New Drives LOSS IS CAUSED BY FIRE AT SWALEDALE Rockwell Thornton and Mason City Firemen Help Fight Flames of unknown origin destroyed the G A Eddy Lumber company and tho Jindrich pany here nesday night causing damages in excess of SHOOO The blaze which was believed to have started in a double gar age belonging to the lumber com pany was discovered by residents in homes nearby at 11 oclock and was brought under control by Swaledale Rockwell Thorn ton and Mason City fire depart ments at 2 oclock Thursday morning No one was injured Loss to the implement com pany was placed at 58000 and included two passenger cars one a new Plymouth two new trac tors a combine and other ma chines It was partly covered by insurance Included in the lumber com panys Joss was a two story warehouse the garage and two trucks It was partly covered by insurance also A pool hall operated by Earl Drury was damaged by smoke and water lighters were hampered by the lack of water and by Thursday morning all sources had been pumped dry All electric power in the town was also shut off when the fire brought wires down W The Mason City fire depart ment left for Swaledale at oclock but the equipment was useless due to the water short ages It finally became necessary to fill buckets with water from awell and pour it into the tanks on the trucks The blaze was brought under control at 2 oclock but is still smouldering it is reported Will Name All State Gridders Watch the Friday GlobeGa zette sport section for pictures and thumbnail sketches of all the AH State players chosen by the Iowa Daily Press associa tion through a poll of coaches LABOR DISPUTE CERTIFIED WASHINGTON dispute between the Quaker Oats com pany of Cedar fiapids Iowa and the CIO cannery workers was certified to the war labor board Contract negotiations arc in dis pute EEASOV FOR SOUR NOTES ALTON III OPThe Rev Marsden Whitford of St Pauls Episcopal church hit a few sour notes as he practiced on the organ but not without good rea son A mouse ran up his pants leg Fire Sweeps Block at Swaledale Pictured above are the ruins of the G A Eddy lumber yard the Jindrich Implement company and a pool hall following a fire which virtually swept an entire city block at Swaledale early Thursday morning A tractoiand mow w shghtU to the tight oi the ceiitei and the two pickup trucks shown in picture were destroyed in the implement company fire This picture was taken from the rear of the building Lock photo Kayenay engraving U for War Factories Harvests FR LEADS IN GIVING THANKS Work Whets Appetites of Arms Plant Employes By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS With appetites whetted by a full days work Americans sit down to a bountiful Thanksgiving dinner for the fruits of the factories and the liar TODAY LOOK FOR CHRISTMAS Pictoquiz ON PAGE 25 SUCH FUN AND PRIZES GET IN IT vests of the fields For the first time since the Pil grim fathers began the custom in New England the old England joins in the observance this year It is not a formal holiday for cither soldiers or war war goes the people of ling land Scotland and northern Ire land arc doing their best to pro vide as festive a board as possible for their American guests President RooseVelt led the American observance with a broadcast from the white house at 10 a m central war time in giving thanks for the greatest harvest in the history of our na tion After workini at his desk all day the president like thousands of his fellow countrymen planned to have the traditional turkey din ner Turkey was missing from Brit ish dinner tables because it is virtually unobtainable there but British families cut into their ra tion allowances to provide the best substitutes nossiblc i U S army force reciprocated by turning over some of the supplies i of turkey they received to be served in hospitals to the sick and wounded of both countries Roast pork was the chief dish for many American soldiers overseas if Special Thanksgiving services were arranged for Westminster Abbey and other historic English churches At home where religious serv ices also were conducted through out the country it was a day of work prayer and feasting Depart ment of agriculture officials said the demand for food this year had reached record proportions with war workers and others crowding grocery stores for days in advance Snow Blankets Most of Iowa as Mercury Takes Nosedive White Thanksgiving Is Observed Continued Cold Is Forecast D E S M O I N E S blanketed Thursday dropped to the lowest the above virtually all aft or the of Iowa mercury mark of zero at Sioux night As lowans observed Tlianks giviiiB day amid the traditional white covering of the country inches deep in some weather bureau forecast colder weather Thurs day and continued cold Thurs day night The mercury hit the lowest of the season after climbing to 56 Wednesday at Burlington The previous low mark was 8 degrees In Des Moines the temperature never got above 44 Wednesday Wednesday nights low was 16 and it was still 16 at midmornin Thursday It was still snowing in Dubuque Thursday morning the weather bureau said but in other sections of the state the snowfall that be gan Wednesday afternoon had ceased Heaviest snowfall reported was three inches at Mason City Es thcrvillc and Marshalllown There was sonic drifting but no roads were reported blocked Two inches of snow fell at Ames Highways were slippery in most sections of the state causing many automobile collisions and minor accidents but no fatalities had been reported early Thursday The coldest readings and the heaviest snow were reported across the northern section of the state Mason City had a minimum temperature of six above The minimum at Mar shalltotvn was nine At Dubuque the mercury dropped to 17 and there were two Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued cold Thursday afternoon Thursday night and Friday forenoon lowest temperature Friday Mason City a diminishing morning in strong winds Thursday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Wednesday 38 Minimum Wednesday night 32 At 8 a m Thursday 6 Precip sleet snow 62 inch Snow 3 incics YEAR AGO Maximum 44 Minimum 27 inches of Thursday snow on morning the ground Muscatine and Clinton reported readings of 10 degrees with onlv traces of snow The temperature at Iowa City was 12 degrees at 8 a m and there was a light cov ering of snow The temperature dropped to 15 degrees ns snow fell at Davenport and the minimum at Omaha was 20 degrees with a trace of snow Precipitation reports included Charles City 51 of an inch Mason City 63 Ames 19 Dubuque 18 Des Moines 13 and Iowa City 06 As auto crash reports came in the state highway patrol reported all roads passable but very slip pery and advised a minimum of travel Highway patrol officials said state highway commission trucks were out sanding danger ous curves and intersections Ftuy War Savings Bonds anrt Stamps from vour GlobeGazelle carrier boy CUT LOOMS IN FARM BENEFITS Budget Bureau Will Recommend Reduction WASHINGTON Farm conservation benefit payments in 1943 may be reduced S100000 000 below the halfabilliondol lar amount authorized by federal crop control legislation and S50 000000 below the amount con gress appropriated for the current crop year Z Agriculture department offi cials who asked that they not be quoted said the uudstct bu reau had agreed to recommend an appropriation of S400000 000 for conservation payments to be distributed among farm ers complying with next years war food program Pound Axis to Prepare for Tunisia Drive By the Associated Tress Allied warplanes pounded the axis Thursdayon the North Afri can front with mounting violence and a broadcast from the radio in Americanoccupied Morocco said the grand offensive against Ger manItalian strongholds in Tuni sia was imminent In a preliminary assault tlie radio said allied troops routed a German column in lightum 28 miles south of Tunis Ihc capital Italian headquarters reported quickening activity especially in Tunisia while the Germancon trolled Vichy radio asserted with out confirmation elsewhere that AngloAmerican advance units again have been throivn back on the frontier between Tunisia and Algeria In encounters with enemy formations enemy trucks were captured and some prisoners were talicii an Italian communique said adding that axis planes at tacked enemy col umns1 Dispatches frnm Madrid said the Germans were piling up fighters and bombers iu Rrcat numbers in the BizerteTums where strongly reinforced axis invasion forces have en trenched themselves behind a oOmiledcep arc of defenses T A Vichy broadcast said axis tanks and motorized contingent were also streaming into the North African colony and for the first time British reinforcements were reported being brought up to the front by air U S army P38 fighter planet were officially credited with the destruction of 14 axis planes in the rising battle for control of tho skies while RAF bombers heavily 1 attacked the axisheld naval base FLYERS SINK 2 JAP DESTROYERS 3rd Damaged in Effort to Reinforce Buna Gona GENERAL MacARTHURS HEADQUARTERS Australia bombers sank two troop laden Japanese destroyers and damaged a third probably fatally Wednesday night to wreck tiic third enemy attempt within week to reinforce the battered BimaGonu lines against Ameri can and Australian attacks it was 1 announced Thursday KOTYimP The official list Of wnreraft sacrificed since hist Tl T C w Keacly i or Agheila Stand The amount appropriated like pavmentK this vcar S450000000 The agriculture dc partmcnt had asked Ihc budget bureau in recommend an 194 priiition of S450000000 for these officials said i Pointing to advances in Hirm prices and to agriculture depart ment reports that farm income was 35 pelcent greater than a year ago budget bureau officials were said to have taken the posi tions at first that farm benefit payments should be reduced They were said to have suggested 3200000000 to finance payments to farmers who complied with soil conservation practices rec ommended by the agriculture de partment Department officials objected it was said on the ground that funds would not be available for payments to farmers for planting within their agricul tural adjustment administra tion acreage allotments for such crops as cotton wheat corn tobtcco rice peanuts and po tatoes forces on their narrowing coastal strip thus rose to One cruiser four destroyers and two landing boats sunk One destroyer blasted heavily and probably sunk One destroyer damaged Beaten back mile by mile Japanese ground forces never theless put up a bitter fight from a jungle front approximately 12 miles long and from one half to j three miles deep ns Heavy fiyhtinp continues in tropical jungle interspersed pprn i UU1 acck reiKicrni movement and ma J9uy Christmas Seals j neuver slow and difficult the communique said We arc now encountering carefully prepared positions strongly fortified with barbed wive dugouts and all the defensive attributes of a fortress Zero fighters appeared again to lend the Japanese troops aerial support after an absence at several days Allied flyers likewise were in constant action A light cruiser and four destrov cts were reported to have mode up the flotilla seeking to land re inforcements tinder cover of daik ness Allied airmen spotted them about 50 miles oft Cape Cretin in llnon ffiilf Flying fortresses North Ameri can B25s and Australian Bcnu forts immediately went inio action with flares and 500 nound bombs Explosives loosed by a fortress scored twice near Ihc stern one destroyer Fires broke out almost immediately The vessel sank within an hour and Japan ese troops were seen imminj in the flarclif sea The Beau forts manned by Australians accounted for the sec ond destroyer with direct hits Combined bombing of fortresses B25s and Beauforts severely damaged the third destroyer This latter was dead in the water for 25 minutes anrt then was seen heading for land the New Guinea coast at a spoed of six knots the communique said It is probable she also sank as our rear air echelons searched her pos sible area of position without sishtiiiE her The cruiser and the remaining destroyer turned about and fled I north in the darkness CAIRO W Rommel evidently is preparing for a stand at El Agheila and Gen Sir Rcr nard L Montgomery is gathering his strength for a smashing as sault on the Germans position in the narrow coastal plains there British military sources said Thursday This tiipy said is tlic mean ing of the comparative hill in Libya where the Cairo com inimiiiuc reported for the sec ond successive day merely that he British were in contact with the enemy between K Ashcila ami AKciIatiia 80 miles to the northeast while allied air forces blaslid anew at Tripoli Bizerte and Sicily Twice before Kommcl has turned the British back from the El Agheila gateway to Tripoli tanin Tripoli was again attacked by our heavy bombers on the night of Nov and hits were scored on targets near the Span ish mole said a communique by the RAF and the middle east command A large merchant vessel south bound toward Sicily was report ed left stationary and down at the stern after a successful attack by torpedocarrying aircraft Hizerlc Tunisia was heavi ly bombed and bursts were seen on the waterfront and across quays it was an nounced Wednesday our fighterbomb ers raided the Gela air field in Sicily and bombs were seen to hit buildings and shelters the communique said In an attack on enemy ship ping off Misurata Tripolitania a direct hit was scored on a mer chant vessel Men of 18 and 19 Read the U S Armys Message on Page 3 ENEMY TRYING TO FLEE TRAP AT STALINGRAD German Losses Mount to Nearly 250000 Dead Wounded Missing Ily KOGRK I GHEENE Associated 1rcss War Editor German hospiUil I r a i n s jammed with tlic maimed and dying were rolling back from the bloody slaughter pens be fore Stalingrad Thursday as the red armies surged ahead in their seven day old offen sive and nazi losses mounted to nearly 250000 killed wounded or captured A Reuters British news agency dispatch from Mos cow said roads 1rom Stalin ifrad still held by the Ger mans were closed with fleeing in disorder in avoid entrapment At the siimt time the Ber lin radio reported heavy Tlus siati offensive action west of Moscow with soviet troops attacking the Germanheld sectors of Ilzhcv and Toro pels Ilzhev lies 130 miles north west of Moscow and Toropels is 12o miles farther west DNI5 the German news agency said the Russians had launched an offensive on t wide front south of Kalinin B5 miles northwest of Moscow Admitting for the first time Hint the RiiFsums were tightm less than 135 from the Lat vian frontier nazi headquarters reported In the region south of Kalinin and in the sector southeast and west of Toropets the enemy started an expected attack Nov 25 on a broad front The German communique as scried that all soviet attacks in the new offensive were repulsed and that local pockets which the enemy was able to create momen tarily were wiped out hy coun terattacks I Although the Kremlin remained silent these reports indicated thnt tiic red armies had started a j jor drive on Ihc Moscow front syncliroiiizcd vith the great coun tciiwrcp from Stalingrad Inter mittently for several weeks the i Gcrimms liavn reported powerful soviet forces niassini in the Mos cuvv region i j On the Stalingrad front Hit j Icrs high command acknowl edged Dial the Russians were striking out in heavy tankled infantry attacks between the Volffa and the Don river bend Soviet dispatcher reported that the red armies were encountering stiffcr resistance as the German throwing all their available ail forces into the battle fought des perately to prevent the of a Riant soviet trap from closing around Ihcm British military observers said they believed the gap between the southern and northern FtUMian armic driving to seal off some nazi troops was onlv about 20 miles While soviet headquarters re ported frcsli gains on both flanks it the German escape corridor from Stalingrad a Berlin broari f rast Bsericd that the Hussian of 1 Icnivc could be considered at a 1 The broadcast said the soviet drive had slackened in the fact of new flamethrowing Unks and machinciruiis firing 3000 rounds a minute i By contrast the Russian com I mand reported the capture of at 1 lca1 nine more towns and vil ages north and south of the hard nazi sicsjc armies and list ed more than 1000 Germans killed J in overnight fighting j Lntct soviet figures listed 7000 I nazis killed and 15000 captured   

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