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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - November 2, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             Ml STORY AMD MO I WES NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AKD UNITED LEASED HOME EDITION trnmi MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY NOVEMBER 2 1942 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE vr r u TWO SECTIONS it ONE NO 20 S SUBS SINK 7 NIPPONESE SHIPS Chairmen of Democrats I and Republicans Issue Final Statements j DES chair inen of the republican and demo cratic state central committees joined Monday in a final appeal to the voters of Iowa to go to the polls Tuesday I believe this is the most i important election Iowa has had j for many years Chairman 1 Jake S More of the democratic j State Central committee said I hope every voter will go to the polls TuesdayThe ballot box is the American way of expressing the desire of our people and the very thing our men in the service are fighting to preserve A large Tuesday will assure our men in the service that the people ot Iowa are supporting them at home More added Chairman Fred Gilbert of the republican State Central commit tee said It has beenan uiiusual cam paign but we have found that there is a deep underlying in j terest ill the outcome of this j election It is going to demon j strate that party lines do not j determine the degree of the patriotism of our people and hat the fundamentals of free dom must continue through cx 1 pression of the will of the voters iat the polls I expect the vote to be that of a normal offyear election with the trend favorable to the repub lican party The republican or ganization is thorough its work ers are active and we shall suffer no losses through apathy CANDIDATES FOR STATE OFFICES ARE LISTED i These are the candidates for whom lowans will vote in Tues days election i United States Wilson 58 DCS Moines MOW completing second term as governor Clyde L Herring 63 Des Moines incumbent Ernest J Seemann Progressive New Waterloo M M Hepton jstall Betteiidorf B Hickert aooper R 46 Cedar Rapids present lieutenant governorNel G KrascheJ 53 Harlan governor in 193738 F M Briggs new ton Ward Hall Moines Lieut dealer Clin Proh Des D Blue 44 Eagle Grove speak er of the house in 1941 general as sembly Lester S Gillette D iFostoria former state senator Charles W White Cedar Falls J Elliott Hollister Proh Oskaloosa i Secretary of state Wayne M Ropes 44 Onawa former state representative Mary K Fa gan 33 Casey former county attorney Guthrie county Ken neth W Trickey P K Iowa Falls H W Reinecke West Liberty Auditor of slateiChet B Akers 54 Ottumwa incumbentW M Shaw 66 Des Moines former examiner for state audi torV office John P Lynch P OUumwa A G Peterson Des Moines Treasurer of G C 69 Mason City in cumbent Walter AVant 67 PCS Moines state representative from Polk county A G Chris toffersen P N state Cen ter George W Swan Centerville Secretary of Harry p Linn Des Moines pres ent assistant secretary ot culture Frank Murray 54 Buffalo Center farmer Claude R Bamvell p N Clarion an nounced recently he did not seek the office but his name will ap state Demos Admit GOP to Make Some Gains By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS With republicans predicting substantial gains and democrats conceding them some but not enough to control Americas adult millions will pause briefly in their drive to win the war to vote Tuesday in the offyear elections which will determine the makeup of the 78th congress and state administrations In the first wartime election since 1918 when the republi cans gained control from a democratic c o n e r ess under Woodrow Wilson and held it for 12 years upwards of 30000000 compared with former expected to choose from more than 1600 candidates 33 senators 432 house members 32 governors and a host of other state offi cers Maine held its election Sept 14 going republican as expected Sharp reductions in registrations indicates a light vote despite ap peals from party leaders includ ing President Roosevelt that citi zens go to the polls to demon strate that one of the nations most cherished privileges the free be preserved in war and democracy kept func tioning In an attack on Washington bureaucrats Frank Gannett as sistant chairman of the republican national committee declared in a radio speech Sunday night that a republican victory would mean that we are going to prosecute i the war with more efficiency j more determination more power and win decisively Senator Thomas re called in a statement that Wood row Wilson lost his program for the peace with the election of a republican congress and charged that a powerful and insidious movement was trying to wipe out the social gains which he said had been made by the new deal if It was announced meanwhile that the senate campaign ex penditures committee had posted investigators in Dela ware New Jersey Massachu setts New Hampshire and Rhode Island and intended to send agents to Iowa and Colo rado The republicans claimed they would pick up at least seven new senate of them now held by democrats and the sev enth by the veteran independent Norris of Nebraska They have only 29 nqw so even if their pre dictions come true they still would have only 36 or 12 short of a majority Democratic spokesmen con ceded nothing in the senate races They said they expected to retain their present strength of 65 Re publicans said their gains would come in at least seven of the following states Nevada Mon tana Wyoming Colorado Neb raska South Dakota Iowa Alirhsons P1 and information T into and out of the United States V Asserting that speed and vol ume of war output have become more than ever before in our history the primary conditions of victory air Roosevelt said in a special message To achieve an all out war pro duction effort we must implement and supplement the steps already taken by the congress and the president to eliminate those peace time restrictions which limit our the J Alvin Mitchell Des Moines Attorney J 0 h n M Rankm 69 Keokuk incum bent Joseph N Wagner 37 Jttumwa representative Mer be Cedar Rapids Conway Atlantic lormer Sidney H nu John E olyst Forest Citv Superintendent of pnblic Jessie M Parker m s of Parties Urge lotvans to Vote WAR EMPHASIS IS OBSERVED IN BALLOT APPEAL Opinion of Hirohito The esteem that Halloweeners held for Emperor Hiro hito was observed by Mason Cityans Sunday when passers bynoted the bayoneted in effigy on the nionureent of the American doughboy near the court house The effigy had been removed Monday Lock photo Kayenay engraving F R Asks Power to Suspend Tariff Laws to Aid Shipping Wants Interference Removed on Transport Into and Out of U S WASHINGTON Roosevelt asked congress Monday to give him sweeping wartime power to suspend any law par ticularly tariffs found interfering with the free movement of per isan New Jerse3 Rhode Island and Delaware U S Bombers Carry Out Destructive Raid on Axis Base in Crete CAIRO States heavy bombers have carried out a de structive attack on the axis air base at Maleme in Crete Ameri can headquarters announced Mon day A communique said fires were started and explosions were noted in the target area United States figluers flying as top cover for allied fighterbombers broke up a formation of M ess ersch mitts in a dog fight over the Egyptian battle area the communique said Lake Mills incumbent May F Francis Waterloo held the office from 1922 to 192G State supreme court three to be H J Mantz R Audubon former district judge1 rohn E Mulroney Fort Bodge assistant attorney generai W A Smith DubuqueWil Hart Iowa City Richard F Mitchell Fort Dodge incumbent Edward A Sager incumbent For representative in congress in North Iowa Second district Henry O Talle 5i TDecoran incumbent iam S Jacobscn 55 Clin ton incumbent John W Gwynne 52 Waterloo incumbent William D Kearney D 1 Marshalllown attorney 43 districl Gilchrist 74 Laurens incumbent Ed ward Breen Fort Dodge for mer state senator and property at our borders and ports In the second category he placed laws imposing limitations on the procurement acquisition or the use of nonAmerican articles or the transportation of supplies in nonAmerican bottoms In the second class he mentioned re strictions on the use under con struction differential subsidy con tracts of nonAmerican materials m the construction of vessels un der Ihc merchant marine act 1936 Thousands of Axis Troops in Desert Trapped CAIRO concentration of axis forces on nazi Marshal Erwin Rommels left flank was pocketed in a bold weekend night thrust by Australian troops who smashed across coastal sand dunes with bayonets flashing and up until Sunday night the enemy had made no real move to break out al though one appeared imminent Cairo reports to London news papers the trapped axis troops numbered several thousand most of them Gelmans The axis force was caught Friday night by the desertwise Australians who crossed the railroad running near the coast in Hie face of considerable ene my opposition The Aussies wiped out axis nests and took prisoners as they surged forward often relying on the bayonet to overcome opposi tion The enemy concentration was not wholly encircled but an iron ring was forged around it with sufficient completeness to make its position untenable The encircling maneuver was disclosed in a British communique which said that up to Sunday night the British forces were holding their positions and had smashed all enemy efforts lo break out The area in which the axis forces were pocketed svas said to lie between the coastal railway and the sector only a few miles wide The communique indicated the trap had been closed sometime Spturday for it saidthat Rom mel s men had attacked Saturday night in an unsuccessful effort to relieve the situation Our infantry neld their ground but some enemy tanks succeeded in joining his infantry in their isolated position the bulletin added attempt to break out was made in the hours of daylight Sunday V Allied airmen continued mean time to batter the enemy along the entire airdromes front troop hammering at concentrations and communications In addition torpedocarryin planes were credited with sinking two axis supply ships with direct hits just as they were entering fobruk bear ing muchneeded Rommels forces equipment for Both vessels blew up and sank quickly the communique said u swept across the Mediterranean to bomb air dromes on Crete way station on Itommels overseas supply line Movie Welcome Party Turned Into Farewell ability to make the fullest and quickest use of the worlds re sources The president asked that he be empowered for the duration of the war to suspend the operation of all or any such laws in such a way as to meet new and perhaps unforeseen problems as they may arise and on such terms as will enable the chief executive and The president also listed re strictions on procurement of food or clothing not grown or produced in the United States on the acquisition for the pub lic use public building or public works of nonAmerican articles or the transportation by sea of navy supplies except in vessels of the United Stales The president said halreadv had exercised the power granted under the first war powers act lo make emergency navy purchases abroad and to enter the materials free of duty HOLLYWOOD UP AH c c or Fayc blond singing star returned to her film career Monday after a years leave oC absence to have a child Mis Faye wife or Band leader Phil Harris was welcomed on the set of Hello Frisco Hello CenturyFox by Actors WILL CONDEMN NICHOLAS LAND NEAR AIRFIELD City Council Takes Steps for Expansion of Municipal Airport The city council Monday au thorized City Solicitor Charles E Cormvell to begin condemnation proceedings against W K Nicholas to acquire property owned by him which is needed in tiie ex pansion the Mason City mu nicipal airport lor military pur poses The city now holds options on 17 Vi acres owned by Walter K and Gladys Tesenc and 80 acres owned by Wayne Larson Mr Coinwell reported to the council at Jls regular monthly meeting An answer is expected before BONDS TO ACQUIRE LAND BEFORE VOTERS TUESDAY Mason City voters are to de cide Tuesday whether the city council may issue 550000 worth or airport bonds to finance the purchase of the land needed to expand the municipal airport for military purposes An allocation of 5650000 by the civil aero nautics administration for con struction of the airport is de pendent upon acquisition of the land by the city Wednesday on an offer made to the United Benefit Life Insurance company for 15 acres he said Mr Nicholas did not acknoxvl edEe receipt of City Manager Herbert T Barclays invitation to negotiate for the purchase of approximately 58 acres owned byhimMr Cornwell reported and Mr Barclay made several fruitless trips to see him Mr Nicholas was contacted through his attorney but no progress has been made in the negotiation it was stated The civil aeronautics adminis tration in charge of development of the airport for the government has urged us to acquire title at the earliest possible time the city solicitor said They require that we have title before they go ahead with the improvement but I be lieve they will start if we begin condemnation proceedings Mr Cornwell explained after the council meeting that it would take two or three days to prepare the legal papers for the condemna tion and that proceedings would condemnation take 10 clays Only an Earthquake government agencie o wok out acuon othcij Afraid It Was Blowout Government agencies Mr Roosevelt said had already re moved many administrative re strictions on he movement of war goods information and per sons bat there remained many legislative obstacles lo that movement which impede and delay our war production effort The chief executive said these obstacles fell into two categories One he asserted directly affected the movement in and out of the United States of materiel infor mation and persons needed tor the war effort and included cus toms duties and the administra tive supervision required by law affecting movement of persons at 20tli John Payne Tyrone Power Cesaro Romero George Montgomery Laird Cregar and others who have appeared in films with her Be fore the party was finished it turned into a farewell affair for Payne Power and Romero who have enlisted in the armed ser vices Buy War Savings Bonds and stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy SANDPOINT Idaho A feminine motorist braked her car Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued cold Monday afternoon t h r o ti g h Tuesday forenoon lowest tem perature Monday night 24 in city and 20 in surrounding country toa quick slop in front of Not much change in Icm county jail Whats the matter in a shaky voice she asked perature Monday Tuesday forenoon night and IN MASON CITY Oh thank goodness I thought I had a flat tire Men of 18 and 19 Read the U S Armys Message to you on page 3 Maximum Minimum Sunday night At 8 a m Monday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum Precipitation The figures for Sundav Maximum Saturday Minimum Saturday night At B a m Sunday 45 25 25 35 g 02 Rain and snow 52 29 32 21 inch after service of the notice Com munications from CAA officials indicate that as soon as the city has turned over to the sheriff a check in the amount fixed by the appraisal of the sheriffs jury the government agency would be ready to begin development activi ties the city solicitor reported Contrary to rumor he added no options with outside parties have been involved in any of the negotiations to date The city has dealt direclly Fie owners and has no knowledge of prior options on any of the land in which he cily is inter ested he asserted The cily manager employed five real estate experts to appraise all thc Properties which are needed and the prices to be paid are based on these appraisals Mr Barclay told the council Thc council approved an agree ment with the Northern Natural Gas company which has a pipe line under the airport property It provided that an extra pipeline is to be constructed parallel to thc original one under the paved run ways so that the runways need not be torn up to repair the pipeline in case of a break CAA officials tell us that these matters are very urgent air Cornwell told the council members in recommending approval oMhe agreement The extension of Pennsylvania avenue northeast between Thir teenth and Fourteenth streets has been graded and opened to light traffic tne city manager reported As soon as it has settled thc right of way is to be graveled The council approved of class C beer renewal s lor the r e Highland grocery 1204 Rhode Is land avenue northeast and the Bntven grocery 1647 North Fed eral avenue H C Brown acted as mayor pro tern m the absence of Mayor Ar Icigh J jyiarshal Other council men present were Carl Grupp Ray E Paulcy and John Gallagher erl clerk also attended and Mrs Nona Finncgan secretary to Mr Barclay was present for he first time as sec retary ol thc council meeting 50 Ships Were in Which Retired By WILLIAM F TVREE HEADQUARTERS U S FORCES IN THE SOUTH PACI FIC Oct 26 Delayed large portion of the Japanese powerful forces esti mated to total 50 drew under a terrific pounding by American warships and planes Thursday after failing to dislodge American forces on Guadalcanal Swarms of American planes rose from bombpitted Hender son Field and aided naval units engaging the Japanese armada i a headon clash Heavy damage was inflicted on two of Japans most modern airplane carriers a heavy cruiser sev eral other cruisers a large de stroyer and possibly a battle ship The United States lost one air craft carrier and the destroyer Porter but American casualties xvere light The navy department an nounced in Washington Sunday that bomb and torpedo hits were scored on two Japanese carriers two battleships and three cruis ers It said also that more than 100 enemy aircraft were de 50 more probably While naval and air units were engaging the Japanese in the tepid bluegreen waters east of Guadalcanal American marines and soldiers were stopping a de termined enemy land attack on the island itself The marines reported lacon ically Suffered 85 casualties Two thousand Japanese bodies present disposal problem Apparently striving for a knockout blow the Japanese sent two huge task forces into the Solomons area Wednesday hop ing to catch the weary Americans on Guadalcanal flatfooted The first force of heavy cruis ers and destroyers was spotted by alert navy reconnaissance in In dispensable Strait behind Flor ida island northeast of Guadal canal These warships were acting as a screen for Japanese troop transports which followed them down from the north and lurked in the vicinity of Santa Isabel island northeast of Guadalcanal The Japanese also brought up a small carrier force deploying it near the Stewart islands east stroyed and wrecked of the giving support mam their Solomons striking force ait fortresses hit what be a large enemy They had hoped to lake the tic fending forces by surprise but swarms of divebombers and tor pedo planes left Henderson field and scored a direct hit on at least one heavy Japanese cruiser while flying appeared to destroyer While American forces were intercepting this striking force the enemy sent another task force including two carriers on a flanking maneuver trying to avoid powerful American fleet units east of the Santa Cruz is lands southeast of Guadalcanal This maneuver developed into a major battle between the op posing air groups f Carrier based American divebombers and torpedo planes roared across a 15D mile stretch of water during the waning hours of daylight and dumped devastation on the in vading fleet ViceAdmiral William F Hal soy commander ot the south Pa cific fleet in command for the first time since the engagement at Wake and Marcus islands or dered costs was an inferno of crashing bombs exploding torpedoes and terrific antiaircraft fire One Japanese carrier of a modern type received a furious pasting from American divebombers At the same imc Japanese planes reached the American ship The Porter sank and the carrier severely damaged later sank The navy announced in Wash ington that bombers and fighters from Guadalcanal scored a direct hit on a Japanese cruiser oh Oct 26 Solomons time clarify whether all the enemy stopped at all It did not the enemy vessels damaged were different ships Thursday night the Japanese had withdrawn They were head ing north possibly to their north ern Solomons bases xvhere they must reorganize and repair their damages before considering an other blow at Guadalcanal Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette earner boy SET CONVERTED CARRIER AFIRE IN OPERATIONS American Damage 3 Vessels With Activities in Pacific WASHINGTON The sink ing of seven enemy ships and tha damaging of three others includ ing a converted aircraft carrier set afire by American submarines during recent operations in the Paciffc were announced Monday by the navy A communique reported that American submarines operating in the western and south Pacific had sunk one large passenger cargo ship two large tankers two mediumsize and two small cargo ships amazed and set afire one converted carrier and damaged one destroyer and a mediumsized anker These operations brought the total of enemy ships reported sunk or damaged by submarines in the Pacific since the outbreak of war to 133 of which 86 were sunk 20 probably sunk and 27 damaged The text of the communique No 178 Far East 1 U S submarines have re ported the following results of op erations against the enemy in far eastern waters Two large tankers sunk One large passenger cargo ships sunk Two mediumsized ships sunk cargo Two small cargo ships sunk One converted carrier damaged and set on fire One destroyer damaged One mediumsized tanker damaged These actions have not been an nounced in any previous navy de partment communique The last previous navy report on submarine action against the Japa nese in the Pacific communique No 151 on Oct 14 reported the sinking of live Japanese ships in cluding a heavy cruiser plus one probably sunk and two damaged U S naval forces Monday ap peared to have the run of the waters around embattled Guadal canal as a result of the devastating battle ot Oct 26in which the Japanese now are reported offi cially to have suffered damage to seven big ships In what the navy described as the first detailed report of the naval air battle east of the Stewart islands one week ago the enemy also was reported to have lost between 100 and 150 planes Japanese warships listed as damaged included two aircraft carriers two battleships and three cruisers This added one battleship and two heavy cruisers lo the score previously reported Announced United Slates losses in the engagement were one car rier as yet unidentified and the destroyer Porter with other ships reporting lesser damage As the battered Japanese ar mada retired from the scene American warships swept into the area from which enemy vessels had bombarded the defenders ot Guadalcanal and let go with a two hour cannonading of Japanese po sitions on the island Several buildings and boats and some ar tillery were destroyed by the shelling which occurred last Fri day Solomon islands At the same time seven Grumman wildcats paid an other call on the enemy base at Rekafa hay northwest of Guad alcanal shooting down three zero float planes and two bi planeS and sending a fuel dump up in smoke Dive bombers attacked enemy destroyers in the vicinity of tha Russel islands about 30 miles northwest of Guadalcanal Thurs ay night and again Friday morn ing with inconclusive results One bomber failed to return As the picture of the great Ocf 26 battle began to take shape it appeared that U S navy flyers had dealt the enemy a severe pounding A detailed report reached Ad miral Ernest J King commander mchief of the fleet and chief of naval operations only Sunday from Vice Admiral William HaU sey who recently todk over com mand of the area In this report the navy an nounced Sunday night the fol lowing damage to the enemy was detailed Four to six heavy bomb hits   

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