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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 23, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 23, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME COUP DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AHO ARCHIVES OES MOINES IA THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH tOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS PRESS FULL VEASEO WHiEs MASON CITY IOWA FRIDAY OCTOBER 23 1942 Where Yanks Face Heavy Test Fight Fire on Guadalcanal Airport Hangar After Japanese Planes Drop Explosives on Field The area around the hangar at the U S marine corps post on Guadalcanal island of United States destroyer flash out against a dim skv as thev nlastrr wsitions to cover the landing of U S marines in the Solomm isS r Associated Press photo from US Believe Jap A Drive Thrown Off Schedule By the Associated Press Japans big new drive in the Solomon islands appeared to have been thrown off schedule Friday as the invaders still withheld their main forces and allied bombers continued to keep them off balance with heavy new blows Gen Douglas Mac Arthurs headquarters reported that united nations airmen dumped 10 tons of bombs on Japanese ships at Buin in the northern Solomons where the enemy has been mass ing for an allout assault on the prize Americanheld Guadalcanal air base m the lower Solomons A communique said all the planes found their targets weath ered a storm of antiaircraft fire and returned safely to their bases So far the navy declared U S planes and warships have sunk or damaged four Japanese cruisers nine destroyers and six transports since Oct 13 In ground fighting the navy reported that American troops beat off a feeler thrust by Japanese forces in the heavy jungle on northern Guadalcanal Oct 20 and said there was no material change in the military situation On the New Guinea front al lied troops driving through heavy tropical rains and over slippery mountain trails were reported to have advanced within nine miles of the Japanese base at Kokoda at the foot of the Owen Stanley range Bur War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Thirteen Roads to Adventure for Men of 18 and 19 Read the U S Armys Message oh Page 3 CONSUMPTION OF BUTTER RISES CHICAGO are eating into their butter supplies at an unprecedented rate and dairy trade representatives suid Friday they would not be sur prised if cold storage stocks had disappeared completely before the end of the year Some dairy men considered rationing adistinct possibility Butter stocks held in cold stor age are used to supplement pro duction over winter months consumption exceeds output It is these stocks built up during months of peak production which enable consumers to obtain ail the butter they want at any time of year One dairy association estimate made privately to the department of agriculture was said to fore cast potential consumption for the this year as 30 000000 pounds greater than the amount ot butter which would be available including production and withdrawals from storage THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 12 REDS GAIN THROUGH STALINGRAD STREETS Official Welcome Is Given by King George and Queen Elizabeth By KATHLEEN HAKRIMAN LONDON Eleanor Roosevelt arrived in London late Friday and was met by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth and many other notables While the arrival of the first lady was supposed to be a strict secret word appeared to have spread all over London and thousands of persons lined the streets around Faddiugton sta tion to welcome her ajany American soldiers were in the crowd The throng cheered and shouted as Mrs Roosevelt stepped from the train She had arrived in Brit ain earlier by plane accompanied by her secretary Malvina Thomp son Tile station platform was sur rounded by a barricade to keei back vthe public and strongly guarded bycivil and lice Shortly before the train arrived a gang of worlcmen nailed down the famous red feet long and 20 feet whichall famous visitors to war time London have first set foot The barricade was set up around the carpet The union jack and the stars and stripes were draped on the barricade The train arrived exactly on time and stopped with Mrs Roose velts coach squarely at the carpet Sirs Roosevelt was smiling as slie stepped from the train She wore a lonjr black coat trimmed with blue fox fur and a cherry red trimmed wilh grccii feathers King George wearing the uni form of a marshal of Hie Royal Air Force was the first to greet Mrs Roosevelt After he had shaken hands the queen wearing a coat of black velvet with a black hat shook hands warmly and chatted for a moment For a few minutes the king queen and Mrs Hoose velt conversed while dignitaries eddied around them Mrs Roosevelt did not curtsy to the king I hope you left the president in good health the king told her The king then introduced her to foreign Secretary Anthony Eden Among those at the platform were Lieut Gen Dwight Eisen hower and Atimiral Harold R Stark V Photographers took pictures during the five minutes which Mrs Roosevelt spent at the train side She then entered a car the kins and queen and was driven off The queen greeted Mrs Roose velt with these words am very pleased to meet you m this country I have been look What a Christmas Card Why not include your per sonal holiday greeting in the special edition of the Globe Gazette which is to be mailed to boys in the armed services on Oct 30 The classified advertising de partment of the Globe Gazette is offering a special price of 25 cents lor a threeline message if paid in advance Messages of more than three lines or if charged will be at regular classified rates The copy of the special edition which will be sent by the Globe Gazette without charge to your husband father son or friend in the armed serv ices will be bluepenciled to direct his attention to your greeting FOR INSTANCE PUNK PETER PVT Whether lhi roaches you Christmas or Easter I am thinking of you Kay to Eng7and RETAKE MAJOR MRSFRGIVEN NAZI WARM CHEERS squadron is in CHARGE HALTED BY THOUSANDS MRS ELEANOR ROOSEVELT your for ing forwaid to very long U S Ambassador John G Wi nant and W Avcrill Harriman lendleasc official arrived on the train with Sirs Roosevelt appar ently having met her plane Mrs Roosevelt was accompanied by Mrs Oveta Gulp Hobby leader of the WAACS It was understood thai Mrs Hobby would inspect the auxiliary territorial service the British equivalent of the Mrs Roosevelt told King George that Mr Roosevelt was in very good health but disappointed that he could not come across with inc The announcement from lie royal polacc said Mrs Roosevelt lias arrived in this country at the invitation of the king and queen in order tt gain firsthand knowledge of Brit ish womens war activities and to visit the United States forces in Great Britain Mrs Roosevelt accompanied by Miss Malvina Thompson will be the guest of the king and queen during the first part of her visit Traveled 360000 Miles Since 33 By The Associated Press Precedentbreaking Mrs frank lin D Roosevelt has done it again Now she is Ihe first presidents wife o fly the Atlantic in peace or war That she did came as no sur prise to a country that has Ions regarded her energy as a national wonder and has got used to her turning up unexpectedlyjust about any place she had a notion to go Since March 4 1933 her travel record is something like 360000 miles more than 14 times around this by auto train plane boat and packhorse She has vis ited every state and several of the possessions Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Continued cold Friday afternoon through Sat urday forenoon Lowest lem pcraturc Friday night 28 in city 21 in country IOWA Continued cold Friday afternoon through Saturday tbrenoou MINNESOTA Continued cold Fri day afternoon through Saturday forenoon Occasional light snow flurries north and central por tions Friday afternoon IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Alaximum Thursday 45 Minimum Thursday night 26 At 8 a m Friday 30 YEAR AGO Maximum 66 Minimum ft Precipitation 10 MMfffl RAMS FREIGHT 6 Taken to Hospital in Crash Near Bluffs COUNJL BLUFFS A speeding doubleheader mail train crashed into the rear of a freight train on the Chicago North West ern tracks jusl outside the cilv limits Friday No one was killed but sis persons were taken to a hospital two believed in a serious condition and others were given first aid treatment Both engines of he rioublehcad cr ripped open by the impact were flung across I he right of way on their sides and a mail car nosed into a bank The caboose and ihe last three cars on the freight train were smashed into kindling The two men believed most riously hurt are G L Brown and W P Woodworth both of Boone Iowa engineer and fireman in the first cab of the doubleheader Brown has a possible fractured skull and eye injury and Wood worth head and internal injuries A R Clark engineer and L M Madscn fireman both also of Boonc were in the second engine They suffered minor injuries Heavy British Squadron Is in Indian Ocean By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Great Britain lias sent a power ful battle squadron into the Indian ocean it was disclosed Friday amid increasing signs hat tin zero hour may be near lor an allied offensive against Japanese onquered Burma Authoritative London quar ters said the biff sea armada in cluded at least three battleships tile aircraft carrier Illustrious and a large force of cruisers and destroyers all under the com mand of Admiral Sir James Somervillc V f No explanation was forthcom ing for the frank disclosure of British fleet movements hereto fore always shrouded in the deep est secrecy but observers inter preted it as a move to draw Japa nese forces from other theaters of the far Pacific war Outspoken hints of an impend ing allied drive into Burma been coming from united nations headquarters at New Delhi India all this past week following the return of Gen Sir Archibald P Wavell British commander in chief from an inspection tour of the IndiaBurma frontier General Wavell himself has declared thatBurmamust be re taken Two other highranking allied military chiefs LicutGcn Jo seph W Stilwell tj S A and Gen Sir Claude J Auchinleck havc been reported conferring with General Wavell at New Delhi within the past few days Only Thursday the Tokio newspaper Nichi Niclii said Japanese military quarters ex pected the allies to reopen tile Burma campaign between No vember and April v Besides avenging the hell of a heatingwhich Genera Stilwell frankly acknowledged had been suffered by the allies in Burma a renewal of the Burma campaign would serve to detour Japanese forces which might now te pre paring for an attack on Russian Siberia H successful it would ao re open the Burma road supply line to China KING IS IMPROVING Christian X of Denmark injured recently in a fall from a horse has shown steady improvement in the past 24 hours DND said Friday in a Copenhagen dispatch Buy War Savings Bonds Stamps from carrier boy your GlobeGazette 35 Per Cent Less Tea Available for 1943 NEW YORK nations lea drinkers will have tu el along with about 35 per cent less lea next year than was used during 1S4I Benjamin Wood managing director of the tea bu reau announced Thursday lie said 65000000 pounds would be allocated to the United Slates for n UllllUll OIR1CS IOI BERLIN From German Broad tn vfia under a pact with the British 2 KILLED BY TRAIV j tt ST PAUL Minn UR Two persons were silled Thursday night when a speeding Soo Line passenger train crashed into their automobile The dead were Mr and Mrs Harry Grinbcrg of St Paul How to Get That Holiday Edition to Your Boy in Service Well heres what to do Address a card or letter containing his latest address to Military Editor GlobeGazette lUason City Iowa II should be explained however that the GlobeGarpttt Dudes the Germans Acknowledge Russians Open Counter Drive at Volga City By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Adolf Hitlers armies suffered jarring new setbacks in the GO clay old siege of Stalingrad as the Russians announced Friday they had broken up a tankled nazi assault in a northwest factory dis trict captured a major position in the DonVolga corridor and seized the initiative inside the city II was the fourth straight day since the last soviet retreat German field headquarters ac knowledged that the red armies were counterattacking at Stal ingrad anil sought to distract attention from that bloody jjravc yard of nazi hopes by emphasiz ing gains in the Caucasus V The nazi communique said Ger man Alpine troops had driven the Russians from defenseindepth positions abovp Tuapse provision al red navy base on the Black sea Soviet dispatches however de clared that Russian marines had lcillcd more than 300 axis troops in a battle in the same general vicinity southeast ot Novorossisk andkilled 150 othersinthe suc cessful defense of a height The Russians further reported they had smaslicd a nnzi wedge which briefly imperiled their first line defenses in the Mozdok sec tor gateway to the Grozny oil fields in the central Caucasus I By all accounts the picture ivas brightening rapidly for the defenders of Stalingrad as win ters first snowstorm swirled across the steppes X Dispatches to Red Star said the Germans were now feverishly at tempting io fortify positions amid the skeleton ruins of the citv building pillboxes and dugouts and converting wrecked buildings into a defense line Red Star declared that soviet troops had sprung to the attack in several quarters of the city throw ing the enemy back on the dcfense despitc the fact that the Germans were using 22 divisions totaling about men in the including 13 infantry divisions four tank divisions and three mo torized well as more than 500 tanks 1200 field guns and 1000 mortars But the outnumbered Russians fought back with mounting vio lence anl soviet pleasure steam ers marshaled from ports along 1800 milcs of the Volga still bore food and munitions to the Stalin grad garrison under incessant at tack by German planes Soviet headquarters and mili tary dispatches gave this account of new red army gains 1 Capture of another key posi tion along the 10mile corridor between Ihe Don and Volga rivers where Marshal Semeon Timoshen ko s relief armies have been con ducting a scries of largescale trench raids against the vital Ger man left flank 2 Defeat of a tankled German infantry assault in Stalingrads northwest industrial section where Ihe defenders immovcd their DO silions in several streets after crushing the nazi drive 3 Seizure of two lines of enemy trenches on thr northwest steppes now bogged down in mud and snow The Russians said about 500 axis troops were killed in a two day fight above the city during wnich soviet forces rccnpUncd a sentinel hill and held it against counterattacks Berlin dispatches reported mud and water everywhere along the centra and northern sectors of the lone battlefront and declared that all except the largest trucks equipped with caterpillar tread were mired reported already gripping the Balkans M nas change of address or if youre i T Editor And theres no time like JVOW to do it Future Glider Pilot Training School at Spencer Transferred SPENCER TThe training school here for future glider pi lots has been transferred to Ham ilton Texas   

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