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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 13, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             Hf NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME THE NEWSPAPER THAT HOME EDITION MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS UNITES PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY OCTOBER 131942 THIS PAPEIi CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE U S WIDENS GRIP ON GUADALCANAL Registering for Gas Rations to Begin Nov 9 RATIONINGPLAN WILL GO INTO EFFECT NOV 22 A Bask Book and Supplemental Rations Provided in Plan WASHINGTON Registra tion for gasoline rationing will begin Nov 9 in all parts of the country except the already ra tioned east The office of price administra tion announcing this Tuesday said that while car owners in the cast need not reregister they must like he rest of lie country provide additional information concerning the tires they own In gearing gasoline rationing more closely to the tire conserva tion program OPA made these innovations in the plan now oper ated in the east 1 Periodic tire inspections as to requirement for a renewal of rations as well as any appli cation for tires or recaps 2 Certification that the appli cant owns no more than five tires for any vehicle 3 Revocation or reduction of rations for drivers who exceed the 35milesanhour speed limit f Che registration beginning Nov 9 will befor A coupon books with therationing plan to go into effect Nov 22 Each applicant will be lequhea to list the serial number of all UresMfWgU JHlists more than he has disposed of the excess tires OPA said it would announce shortly details of the periodic tire inspection program All car owners registering next mi ith will receive A books containing coupons for mileage at the rate of 2880 per year Applications for supple mental rations which the OPA said would receive most care gful scrutiny may be filed any time after the basic A book has been received To qualify for a supplemental ration the applicant must show mat he needs more than 150 miles per month of occupational dnvmg and that he has formed a carsharing club for carrying three or more persons in addition to himself to and from work reg ularly If the applicant has not formed a carsharing club he must prove that alternative means of trans portation are inadequate and that it is impossible for him to carry others Price Administrator Leon Hen derson said the plan was designed to reduce the national average passenger car mileage to 5000 a year as recommended by the Baruch committee In order to achieve this aver age Henderson said we must remember that only essential driving can be permitted and that the vast majority o cars will receive less than the average average Through this patriotic curtailment of driving it will be possible for this country to live within its rubber supplv and to carry on her activities essential to winning of the war Of the 2880 miles a year driv ing based on 15 miles to the gallon provided by the A book 1800 is presumed to be for oc cupational driving and the re mainder for necessary family driving J Buried Alive With Cement at Hopper SCOTTSBLUFF Ncbr Jcrald A Gleason 26 Turlon S Dak a worker at the army sat ellite air base here was buried alive by dry cement at the bottom of a large cement hopper Monday It was the first fatal accident al the base A vibration of unknown origin jarred the cement loose from the sides of Ihc hopper said A J Terteling president of the company which has construction contracts at the base Hearse for Hitler ESSEX Iowa hearse lor Hitler has been contributed to the scrap drive but not as a conveyance It will go in the form of war ma terial Ben Johnson has donated the hearse to the scrap drive Not used for its normal purpose for many years the vehicle has been scrvin as a playhouse foichildren Peace or 90 Days More Climaxing a 11 year siege of quarreling police haled Mrs Anna Rubinstein left and Mrs Yetta Furst into Los Angeles court for disturbing the peace The judge sen tenced them to 30 the same cell where they are pictured above getting off to a frigid start The judge stated that if they continue battling hell extend the sen tence to 90 days 3 ARRESTED ON BRIBERY COUNTS Plant Is Taken Over by Navy WASHINGTON navy took possession Tuesday of the plant of Triumph Explosives Inc at Elkton Md and two subsi diaries at Milford Del and the white house announced that the FBI had arrested a plant vice president and an army and navy inspector on bribery charges A white house statement said the inspectors were charged with accepting bribes in the guise of servicefees and that the navys preliminary investigation indi cates that more than SI000000 in management irregularities may be involved The navy took over the plants under terms of a presidential ex ecutive order which said it was desirous that they be operated effectively and safely Those inrested the white house said were Josef Ben Decker ex ecutive vice president of Triumph J A McCambridge until recently civilian army inspector at the Tri umplvTDlanV and Reginald Gregi ory chief civilian navy ihspectbr at The two subsidiaries taken un der governmental control are the Milford Ordnance company and the Sussex Ordnance company Details of the bribeiy charges not immediately available the white house It said more arrests were expected were from dues collector for the Amnlga fcnsive mated Meat Cutlers and Butchers Union Winter Begins to Close In on Russian Front Dispatches of Reds and Nazis Indicate Armored Trains Used Methodist Camp Superintendent Dies DUES COLLECTOR SENTENCED BURLINGTON UP Alfred Holler 40 was sentenced to five years in the Fort Madison v er posiuon was cic tiary after being found guilty of scribed as even more impregnable embezzlement while serving as a tvuiuie by Soviets to Blast Germans in Caucasus By HARRISON SALISBURY Initcd Press Staff Correspondent German and Russian reports Tuesday indicated that winter is beginning o close down on the long Russian front from the ap proaches to the Caucasus oil coun try to the battlegrounds of Len ingrad and the far north Signs appeared in tlie com muniques from both sides that worsening weather conditions and possibly the strain of the great battle of Stalingrad which started 50 days ago had caused a comparative lull in lighting It appeared possible that the Germans desirous of avoiding their heavy losses in late autumn and winter fighting last year were switching their strategy to an allout defensive considerably earlier than last year There was no definite indication that the Germans had started any largescale movement of forces from the east to meet potential second front threats in the west However sudden renewal of largescale air war over Malta suggested to British observers that the six weeks lull in African war tare may soon end Military quarters in London said that the statements of the nazi radio supported the opinion that the nazis have temporarily abandonedtheirattempt to smash Russian military power They held that this was tanta mount to a nazi admission that tin allies are forcing them into war on two or three or more predicament which German mili tary strategists have always sought to avoid This theory received some back ing from the nazioperated radio Oslo which discussed the switch in German tactics from the offen sive to the defensive Oslo said that this did not mean that Ger many was in any peril ot losing the war since her position was clc on the defensive than on the of The nazi air force Ihe Oslo commentator pointed out domi nates the Russian Hinterland from Astrakan to Saratov The heaviest fightingon the Russian front appeared o be in the Caucasus where Moscow reported biting winter weather already had descended The communist party newspaper Pravda published pictures showing Russian forces in the Terek river region in winter battle dress In Ihe TerekMozdok sector the Russians had brought up armored trains to blast the Germans and were counterattacking in consid erable strength Russian counter attacks southeast of Novorossisk were reported and the Germans claimed that the battle for Tuapse soviet naval base south of Novo rossisk was entering the last phase The nazi high command admitted the Russian counterat tacks in the Mozdok area but said they had been repulsed Along the Stalingrad front Rus sian and German forces were busy strengthening their positions A small railroad station outside ot Stalingrad was recaptured by the Soviets The British Exchange Telegraph ui Agency reported that soviet rein cution of it forcements were being brought to the Stalingrad front The Russians reported that the nazis launched an attack with 50 tanks and 3000 men in an in dustrial sector of northwest Stalingrad The Germans ad vanced somewhat a a cost of 2000 men and 30 tanks CLEAR WAY FOR LAW TO INDUCT 18 YEAR OLDS F R Gets Speedy Action From Congress on Lowering Draft Age WASHINGTON P Swiftly following President Roosevelts declaration that the draft age would have to be lowered con gressional leaders cleared Ihe way Tuesday for house action this week on legislation to induct 18 and 19 year olds inlo Ihc armed forces After a conference with Speaker Rayburn DTcx and Majority Leader McCormack Chairman May Ky announced that the mili tary committee would begin hearings on lie bill at S a m E T Wednesday And sit alt night if necessary in order to eel it to the floor by Satur day al the latest The house of representatives1 said Speaker Rayburn does not intend to be put in the position of doing anything to delay the ivar effort or the effective prose On e of Stalingradstank factor ies was saidto be turning out tanks again despite its proximity to the battle lines The Germans claimed that their bombers were attacking soviet supply lines along the Volga Other planes were reported setting fires in the Grozny oilfields Northern Germany Is Hit by RAF Bombers LONDON bombers attacked industrial northern Ger many Monday night losing two bombers Ihc iir ministry sml Tuesday The raid apparently was of moderate scope compared to other mass raids Reveal Loss of 3 U S Cruisers Off Solomons Sfc tT4 1 SUNK IN SAVAGE NIGHT BATTLE American Ship Toll in Islands Reaches 9 WASHINGTON fT Three heavy cruisers were added Tues day to the announced American naval losses in the savage but suc cessful battle two months ago to break Japanese control of the vital southeastern Solomons While protecting the night land ing of American reinforcements in the TulagiGuadalcanal area Aug 89 the navy disclosed late Mon day the cruisers Quincy Vin Mason Cityans Son Was Aboard Cruiser When Lost in Fight William J Jarvis son of Sirs Anna M Jarvis director of the local Isolation hospital was aboard the heavy cruiser U S S Astoria when it was lost with two other cruisers in action at Solomon Islands last August He was at first reported miss ing in action but Mrs Tarvis later received word he was safe lie has now landed in San Fran cisco where he expects to re main during the winter accord ing to Mrs Jarvis J J Stream brother of Mrs Jarvis flew from Chicago to San Francisco to see his nephew when they landed Jarvis has been in the nary for the past 15 years cennes and Astoria were sent to the bottom by enemy gunfire and torpedoes The toll raised the Japanese score in the grim Solomon is lands conflict to nine United Slates cruisers four transports and two des U S CRUISER VINCENNES 10000 TONS troyers Two more destroyers were damaged Tlie enemys known losses total 38 ships sunk or damaged Tiiespectacular battle fought in the glare of star shells and scarclilifiits also brought des truction of the Australian cruiser Canberra The navy while ack nowledging many allied casualties reported that most of the crew men were saved Capt Samuel PJ Moore of Alex andria Va commander of the Quincy was among those lost The skippers of the Vincennes and the Astoria Captains F L Riefkohl of Mounabo Puerto Rico and William G Greenman of Water town N Y were saved The navy said it was impossible to determine what losses were suffered by the Japanese force of cruisers and destroyers But the without attempting an attack on our transports and supply ships The conflict opened as the allied cruisers stood guard over Hie landingof supplies and ad ditional troops on the liases seized by V S marines on Aug 8 and 9 Enemy planes dropped flares over the landing opera tions and the Japanese ships skirting the south coast of Savo island between Tulagi and Guadalcanal opened up with guns and torpedoes The enemy headed for the sup ply ships The Canberra covering the landing operations at this point was damaged set afire and later abandoned She sank the next morning After this brief engage ment the enemy steamed for the passage northeast of Savo There Japanese searchlights and star shells disclosed a second screening uiijo uiuLiusuu a second screenir communique added that the force of destroyers and cruisers enemy withdrew lo the northwest I The enemy fire was heavy and accurate the navy said and Ihe U S cruisers Quincy and Vin cennes were hit repeatedly and sank during the night Badly damaged in the same engagement the Astoria burned throughout the night and finally sank A third United Stales force stationed within the land ing area apparently escaped the attack and while cost was heavy the necessary reinforce ments and supplies reached their goal The importance of the Solomons operations was emphasized by the navy in a communique disclosing that the united nations have estab lished bases in the New Hebrides Solomons the navy said would The plan as outlined by the speaker calls for hearings on the legislation Wednesday and Thurs day On Friday the rules commit tee will meet and determine the length of debate on the house floor with Ihc house itself consid ering the bill Saturday May said that the witnesses would include Major General Lewis B Hershcy Secretary of War Stimson and possibly Gen eral George Marshall army chief of staff Earlier in Ihe day Secretary of War Stimson stressed a need for exceptional soldiers and asked that legislation for draft ing the 18 and 19 year olds be expedited In a letter to Chairman May D Stimson said the ur gency of the task of building up for the United States the best army in Ihc world cannot be overemphasized Our survival is in the balnncc lie said The urgency ot the task of building up for the United States the best army in the world cannot be overempha sized Our survival is in the balance he said Its accomplish ment demands the substitution of current necessity for time preferences our peace Stimson said the necessity for lowering the draft age was this That our army be animated by the youthful enthusiasms and rcsilince of spirit which has surged through all earlier American armies that in our human desire to protect lie youth of our land we remember the terrific pace of modern war that we realize above every consideration the imperative necessity of creating an army as quickly as possible more ef ficient more determined more ardent than Europe and Asia can produce after leu years of concentrated training and in doctrination Youth zealous for power and destruction of liberty is the strength of our enemies armies American youth is our strength and despite our wishful thinking The llcv U A Davis for many years superintendent of the Methodist camp it Clear Lake died Tuesday afternoon in i local hospital folloiviiiff a major operation Performed a week ago He is survived liy his widow and two sons Wat sou Davis Chicago and Willis Davis Merrill and a grandson Howard Davis Chi cago The body was taken to Wards funeral home at Clear Lake No funeral arrange ments have been made as yet SPARKS FLY IN VERBAL CLASH Jefiers Stands Firm m Senate Hearing WASHINGTON h c sparks still Tuesday in the wake of a verbal collision between President Roosevelts new rubber administrator and r senate com mittee inquiring into the relative merits of cotton und rayon tor use in heavy club tires Chairman Smith DS Car of the agriculture committee an nounced appointment of n sub committee to fight for what he termed the protection of cotton from big financial interests after Administrator William M letters had challenged anyone o stop him from substituting rayon for cotton if the army wanted it that way 15 JAP PLANES ARE DESTROYED IN OPERATIONS Report Nipponese Forces Suffered Many Casualties WASHINGTON navy announced Tuesday that United States marines had succeeded in enlarging their positions on Guad alcanal island in the Solomon is lands during two days of offensive fighting in which the Japanese had many casualties Announcement also was made of destruction of 15 Japanese planes damage to two enemy light cruisers ami loss of two United Stales planes in opera tions on Oct D and 11 Navy communique No 148 said South Pacific all dates are cast longitude On Oft During the morning ma rine corps aircraft attacked a Japanese force of two light cruis ers and four destroyers in the area uovih of New George island A di rect hit damaged one of the cruis ers and when last seen she was down by the bow Three of the enemy seaplanes which attempted to fight off our attack were shot down Tiie second cruiser was also attacked and minor damage was reported Navy and marine corps search planes bombed enemy anti aircraft installations at Rekata bay and straffed seaplanes on the water The results of this attack are not known 2 On October 11 Four waves Japanese bombers with fighter escort to taling about 35 bombers and 30 fighters attempted o positions at navy and marine corps firhters intercepted and forced the biimliers to drop their loads in nil open field Eight enemy bumuers and four zero fighters were shot down Two United Slates fighter planes were lost United States marines suc ceeded in extending our positions to ihc westward on the north shore of Guadalcanal island after two days of offensive operations Army fighters assisted bv straf ing enemy troops and installations and the enemy suffered many cas Smilh said lie was biUerlv dis in the new adminisKePOi t JOp appointed Ira tor Senator Noms UndN c b r tnld reporters on the other hand that he approved of tile coura geous way Jetfers talked before the committee Monday even though he said he ivould hate to see the cotton farmers lose this market He talked like he was going to i his own boss Norris said We need administrators this government like that in Jcffcrs former president of he Union Pacific railroad told lie Seen Going South By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS President Roosevelts disclosure that allied strategy calls for new ofiensives against Germany ana Japan was followed Tuesday by Chinese reports that a big Japa nese armada including four air craft carriers and seven battle ships had been sighted some time ngo cnroutc toward the south Pacific DECLARES committee lie was indifferent to i DECLARES U S that if EXPAND SOLOMONS pressure groups and army wanted rayon substituted i for cotton he would so order i Senator Stewart DTcnn appointed chairman of fhc sub committee to gather all the facts for and against cotton said he would start hearings soon Sen ators Ellendcr and Aikcn RVt were named to serve with him nURRIE TO BE INDUCTED DES MO1NES capital citys director of adult education for the last three years 36year old Paul Durrie will be inducted into the army as a private Satur We must face this truth I should be derelict in my responsibility to this country and its heritage should I fail to voice he j day at CnmpDodge He had charge Ko of Des Moincs public forums and also had been director of civilian defense training schools in DCS A Tomes less likely to disrupt industry agj rictilturc other essential wartime JJAECN civil pursuils and domestic reia tionships than to build the army from the other end of the age cate gories He saicl he had nn objection to a provision of he bill intro duced by Representative Wads ivorth RN Y to defer from immediate induction youths of 38 and 19 called to the colors during the second half of an academic year The deferment would end at the conclusion of the academic year Selective service headquarters Weather Report FORECAST CITY Continued mild c oeiecuvo service headquarters and FIJI islands as well as in New said meanwhile that youths who Caledonia have reached the age of 18 since The Japanese expansion in the last June 30 would not be subject anolher registration juiu umu anoiner general registration have threatened these bases along is held even if the minimum age with the United States supply lines for military service is lowered to to Australia and New Zealand include them temperatures Tuesday after noon Tuesday night and Wed nesday forenoon IOWA Nol much change in tem perature Tuesday afternoon through Wednesday lorcnoon MINNESOTA Not much change in temperatures Tuesday after noon except cooler northwest and extreme north central por tion Tuesday afternoon and Tuesday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday 70 Minimum Monday night 38 At 8 a m Tuesday 41 YEAR AGO Maximum 72 Minimum 57 I Wishfriglon Kcir Arf mirni John C McCain lately a naval nir commander in the southwest Pacific old news men confidently llial we can hold the Solomons and expand them Speaking at Secretary Knnxs press conference Admiral Mc Cain said American forces in the strategic Archipelago had already shown sufficient superiority in material and men to maintain and enlarge their grip on the is lands The admiral said that from Aug 21 to Sept 17 the Japanese lost 133 planes over Guadalcanal island to 25 American ratio of five to one INDICATES JAPS PREPARE TO MEET ALLIED DRIVE A Reuters British news cy dispatch from Chungking Cninjis warlime capital quoted a Chinese military spokesman as sayins thai the Japanese fleet was observed steaming toward the Soulli seasbattle theater The report if true suggested that the Japanese were diverting their major naval strength to meet the united nations offensive heralded by Mr Roosevelt pow erfully reinforcing their badly damaged forces in the southwest zone of operations In the Solomon island cam paign alone Ihe enemys known losses total 38 ships sunk or damaged against a loss of nine American warships three cruisers four and two destroyers The navy in Washington re vealed late Monday that the U S cruisers Quincy Vincennes and Astoria were sunk by Japanese cunfirc and torpedoes while pro tecting the landing of American i   

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