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Mason City Globe Gazette: Monday, October 12, 1942 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 12, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME OF AND ARCHIVES NES THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLIX ASSOCIATED PRESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES MASON CITY IOWA MONDAY OCTOBER 12 1942 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE j j j x Ab i rvi JIO1 ur t VVU i3CWi T w ONE NO 2 CHURCHILL ALLIED MIGHT GROWING Heavy Nazi Assaults on Stalingrad Subsiding fc V v s REDS ADVANCE IN FLANK MOVE NORTH OF CITY Hitlers Timetable for 1942 Appears to Be Beautifully Scrambled By CLYDE A FARNSWORTU Associated Press War Editor At the end of seven weeks of terrific attack and epic defense the indomitable defenders of Stal ingrad have forced the Germans by the sheer tax on flesh and blood to halt mass troop assaults on that ruined but strategically valuable city With signs of a great defensive victory emerging the Russians themselves reported capture ot advantageous positions in heir flanking action northwest of the further peril of the immobile well as gains by counterattack in the Mozdok area of the Cau casus Adolf Hitlers time table for 1942 seems to have been beautifully scrambled For the third day the Germans and their puppets were largely confined to artillery and air as saults on Stalingrad The Russian communique said that artillery and mortar duelling continued in the immediate Stalingrad area The Germans actually won posi tions inside the Volga city but failed to reach fhe river reiterative thump of the German minerwerfer and the grumble of siege cannon wliile axis troops dug in to hold their Stalingrad wedges were nothing like the fuehrer intended when on Sept 30 he declared We shall take Stalingrad You may depend on that Even then 15 days had passed since the Germans announced that the battle of Stalingrad had en tered its final phase Typical of the price levied by the Russians on the Germans mad effort to save the fuehrers face at Stalingrad was Mondays communique report that two companies of German troops were wiped out when the Ger mans attacked the outskirts of a Stalingrad workers settle ment This German action nowise ranked with the strength of previ ous mass assaults For the first time in weeks the Stalingrad battle took a secondary place in the Russian communique Germans had been playing it down for days The Kussian com munique took a broad approach by reporting continuing action on the whole RussianGerman front In the Caucasus the Germans still were striving to take the val uable Grozny oil friends southeast of Mozdok but the Russians re ported a counterslroke with which they disrupted Ihe German offen sive and recaptured defense posi itions The Russians were reported advancing also in the zone southeast of Novorossisk Black sea port which the Germans now hold a town honseby house after the German garri son was surrounded American made jeeps were delivering Anti aircraft guns to the Caucasus front Pilot Killed When 2 Fighter Planes Collide NEW YORK army fighter planes collided in midair over populous Queens county Mon day sending one into a diving crash which killed the pilot while the other landed safely at nearby La Guardia airport Russians white arrows on the offensive on the Ger man lett tlank at Stalingrad entrenched jagged line for positional warfare and withstood furious German attacks black Nazis besieging Stalingrad concentrated on the northwestern section aiming to cut through to the Volga river but despite aerial pounding the Russians con tinued to ferry reinforcements shaded arrow into the F R to Talk oh Draft of 18Year Olds WASHINGTON white house indicated Monday that a presidential fireside chat Monday night would touch the issues of a second front and the drafting of young men 18 and 13 for the armed forces President Roosevelt gave over most of the day to finishing the address scheduling only one conference Significantly that was with Paul V McNutt in charge of war manpower mo bilization and with Brigadier General Lewis B Hershey se lective service director Presidential Secretary Stephen Early indicated that the prob lem of manpower would be cov ered in the address along with selective service Asked about the drafting of 18 and 19 year olds he replied I think youll find that in there To an inquiry whether the speech would touch on European problems and a second front Early answered I think youll construe what he says as applying to a second front While the chief executive said at a recent press conference that the fireside chat would not be in the nature of a general war review Earlys remark about a second front suggested that the chief executive might have de cided to broaden his subject matter to some extent The president will speak 30 minutes starting at 9 p m cen tral war time Willkie Arrives in Alaska From China FAIRBANKS Alaska Wendell Willkie and his party arrived at Fairbanks at 5 p m Sunday by plane from China via Siberia He said he would arrive in the United States in a few days and that all members of the flight were in the best of health Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Transport Czar Rides Allied Victory to Be Triumph for Oppressed F R on Columbus Day WASHINGTON MVPrcsident Roosevelt terming the war o con flict to determine whether the march of progress shall proceed or be halted by the totality of con quest declared Monday that a united nations victory will be a victory for oppressed and en slaved people everywhere In a Columbus day statement he said our cause is not only liberty for ourselves but liberation for others in At r V feclora on a strap in an Atlanta Ga bus beside a local power official is Jos eph B Eastman the director of the office of defense trans portation who has final say on how the nations citizens maj ride by rail and bus U S EQUIPMENT Jef fere Heatedly Backs Up IS POllRINGINTOiayon Heavy Tires in EGYPTS FRONT Test of Nazi and American Arms on Desert Is Expected By FRANK L MAKTIV CAIRO equipment from the United States pouring into Egypt in everincreasing quantities the inevitable show down battle for which the allied and axis armies are preparing in the western desert promises lo become a crucial test of the re spective merits of American and German arms While the American equip ment may not be a deciding factor it is safe to say it will play an Important part In the impending struggle in which Field Marshal Rommel will find more representatives of the united nations arrayed against him than the axis forces Tiave encountered at any time in three years of war in Africa Meanwhile American irfnde Spite of Question Barrage M Administrator William hirt fT farm state senators Monday have sram pressure on thc extended lines of communication over which Rom mel is trying to move up rein forcements for his own armies American and British flyers are hammering by day and night at axis supply routes and depots At no time in the past three years have the peopleof the Nile Delta seen so many allied planes flying to arid from enemy territory American heavy bomber pilots who range hundreds of miles over the Mediterranean and even into the backyard of Europe can bear witness to the fact that large quantities of equipment and sup U S Air Attacks on Mediterranean Shipping Continue CAIRO anew in an almost nonstop attack on axis supply shipping across the Mediterranean United States heavy bombers scored hits Sun day on two freighters escorted by three destroyers off Ihe coast of Crete and a few min utes later shot down two Mes serschmitt 110s and a Junkers 88 By bringing down these three German planes the American gunners destroyed onethird of the attacking force of land based nazi aircraft which arose to defend the freighters The vessels were estimated at 8000 tons each One of the heaviest bombs carried landed siiuarely on the stern of the first ship and when it last was ssen it appeared lo be sinking returning flyers reported Thc second freighter trailing the first by 500 yards was hit by smaller bombs plies intended for the axis arm ies in Egypt now are at the bot tom of the sea Those supplies which are set ashore at Tobruk and Bengasi are the targets of almost con tinuous attack by American and British medium bombers while the coastal road over which they must be trucked to the fighting front are subjected to frequent strafing by tighter planes V Typical of these assaults was a raid bfourmotored United Stales bftmbers on Bengasi Sat urday and an attack bv Austral ian heavy bombers on the in termediate supply base of Tym baki Crete Unofficial observers in Cairo wng o e heavy losses the cers e oped thc horrib axis is suffering in Africa through shortage would be r American and British bombing lieved but Ive about lost fai raids are speculating on now much longer the German high command can continue to try to keep Rommel supplied with equipment and still meet its com mitments in Europe On thc other hand a steady flow of allied ships laden with equipment labelled USA is arriving In Red Sea ports where it is being assembled and moved over dusty roads to the front Axis hopes of halting this flow rest entirely on their submarines in the Atlantic and the compara tively few fighters and bombers which Rommel can now spare lo altack the allies overland supply lines in Egypt ers o lor the am for rayon So far as I am concerned and make no mistake about he continued I am not influ enced by anybody or anyone Senator McKellar D Tenn contended that seven ot the nine members of a WPB advisory board which recommended the substitution were tire manufac turers and others interested in rayon Jeffers said he did not know vhether that was correct but Im assuming that in a war that you can trust Americans He asserted that expansion of rayon facilities would require a year to complete while tests of Enthusiasm LITTLE FERRY N School children went all out for the salvage campaign here and as a result police had to search for a missing pony the springs of an automobile and iron jacks The pony had been used to pull a heavy iron safe to thc school yard scrap heap The jacks were taken from a house that had been raised up on blocks and the springs were removed after they had been temporarily taken from an automobile a man was repair ing Everything was recovered but authorities asked the children to restrain their enthusiam in a class competition for a plaque the sal vage committee will present SDIEASfs BOMBER FALLS Sole Survivor Is Critically Injured Wait just a moment intP Kans army ipted Jeffers Theres no Plane crashed on a farm Jmes no mess hillside three miles from the To air base Sunday carrying STEADY GAIN IN POWER CITED IN REVIEW OF WAR Declares Hitlers Prospects Darkened to Considerable Degree Wheeler suggested he be allowed to answer them one at a time Who urged you to go ahead with the rayon program Sena tor Bilbo DMiss asked Im being urged by the fact the files indicate this thing has been mulled over and has been approved by a committee Jeffers retorted Lets call those who brought this mess about suggested Chair man Smith rupted Jeffers mesV I thought you said there was a muddle Smith said p cotton were continuing If cotton will do the job better onths and months Jeffers re plied and Im going through with this or else Jeffers declined to lake sides b he added I am for cotton V controversy between advo In the meantime Jeffers sadi r synthetic rubber produc ic rayon expansion would u m gvm on the the rayon expansion would pro ceed as weve been gambling too damned Senator Downey D Cal an nounced that he and Senator Reynolds D N Car would in troduce Tuesday a bill to permit the government to purchase pri vate automobiles cither through requisitioning or voluntary trans fer to permit the government lo purchase older cars from per sons enraged in essential war scrap them and replace them with can obtained by the government from sources less vital to the war effort Senator McKellan Insisted at the hearing that the construction of new rayon facilities using critical materials ought to be held up for the conclusion of the tests to see which would be the best to use cotton or rayon cords Do I understand you gentle men to say to me that I am to continue to hold up this program for fid to 90 days while tests are made on cotton the rubber ad ministrator demanded So far as I am concerned Mc Kellar replied the answer is yes Somebody is going to have to do something to stop me Jeffers shot back Otherwise I am going to authorize rayon because I think it is the best thing to do and I am not being influenced by anyone This isnt a new question Jeffers insisted The vitw of the chemist and practical fel lows as well is that in syn thetic rubber tires cotton heats more than Senator Overton DLa asked if the transfer to rayon wouldnt create a monopoly for the seven companies he said were the only ones prepared to manufacture tires with rayon cords Jeffers replied that he didnt believe any monopoly would be created Ive got only one job to do and thats to get the rubber out to win this war Jeffers replied Im going to use anybody thats needed to do the job monopoly or no monopoly Senator Bankhead DAla said he thought it likely rayon producing plants might control the tire manufacturing business after the war if they were given all of the orders now Our job now is to win the war Jeffers retorted Lets quit talking about whats going to hap pen after the war Chairman Smith DS Car veii in tairo 011 OMUUJ tuo tjtirJ knowing of the heavy losses the told Jcffers he hoped thc horrible axis is sufferin i shortae re in everybody When he said Jeffers had his sympathy the latter declared I dont want sympathy I want con fidence Theres a difference between your being behind me and after me he declared Whose bread I eat his song I stnt Smith replied I resent that kind or a state ment Jeffers remarked heat edl Smith said he was quoting an old saying and was speaking generally Well you looked at me Jeffers said senators started firing one hand and petroleum on the other Tax Bill to Be Approved WASHINGTON tax bill was near enactment Monday out congressmen and tax experts agreed that the really tough tax problems had been left on the which the treasury next tax bill is preparing House acceptance of the sen ates D per cent victory tax levied on the earnings of all who make more than S12 a week was fore cast as senatehouse conferees prepared to adjust differences over the pending bill Chairman Walter F George D Ga of the senate finance com mittee said he hoped to start conferences with the house Tues day and complete work this week on the historymaking measure means committee indicated that it was a question of accepting the senates victory to raise 53650000000 finding the lost revenue else where with no apparent place to turn but a sales tax which neith er house has approved The senate passed the bill Sat urday 77 to 0 but left several important questions for the next tax bill which Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau Jr has announced will follow im mediately Those problems in clude 1 Compulsory savings The pending bill creates a committee to study ihe problem and recom mend legislation which will have to be dovetailed with taxes 2 The treasurys spendings tax involving the compulsory sav ings principle which the treasury has indicated it would renew in the next bill Sen Joseph C OJIa honey D served notice on the senate that he would champion it in the next bill 3 Social security taxes Although the senate overrode President Roosevelts wishes to freeze the old age benefit tax at one per cent on employer and one per cent on em ploye for 1943 the president gave notice that he would ask for sub stantial increases after disposal of the pending bill 4 Sales tax Advocates of this type of levy assert it is absolutely inevitable in any new revenue bill because all other sources have about reached the point of dimin ishing returns 5 Percentage depiction for oil and gas wells Those opposed to the loophole in the tax laws have promised to renew the fight at the first opportunity Sen Robert M La Toilette prog Wis told the senate that unless this special privilege for owners of oil and gas wells and certain types of mines were repealed he would fight to extend the depletion allowance principle to fanners and all others dealing with natural re sources th hoi Army officers Monday iad not determined the cause of the accident Sgt James C Price Trenton Ga was the only one of the nine men aboard still alive when Farmer C E Patterson on whose land the crash occurred reached the scene I listened nt the cabin of the plane but couldnt hear anyone lie said But someone was call ing from down toward the stream I went down to help him Lieut It R Rubin of the To peka base said the plane was on a routine flight He listed the dead as Lieut Ralph M Dienst 26 Pas adena Cal Lieut Charles W Fischer 22 ostnry H Edwards 2J L Holmes 24 Boston Lieut James Berkeley Cal Lieut James Fort Bragg Cal Staff Sgt Willie T Barnes 3j Columbus Ga Staff Sgt Max Banon 24 Pleasant Hill La Staff Sgt Aubrey M Large 23 Francis Okla Staff Sgt Merlin O Brager 20 Madison Wis Injunction Against Petrillo Is Denied the governments request to re strain James C Petrillo president of the American Federation of Mu sicians and the federation from enforcing its ban against making recordings Thurman Arnold as sistant attorney general in charge of antitrust proceedings came from Washington argue personally After hearing more than an hour of argument by Arnold Judge Barnes made his ruling without hearing the Petrillo side of the suit which Joseph A Padway general counsel for the American Federation of Labor was prAiarcd to submit DIES OP INJURIES DES MOINES JP Douglas Price 3 year old son of Mrs Doris Price died Monday of injuries when he was hit by a r wen e was al Jeffers that Senator car in front of his home Buy Har Savings Bonds and Stamps from your GlobeGazette carrier boy Weather Report FORECAST MASON warm er Monday afternoon Monday night and Tuesday forenoon Moderately strong winds Mon day afternoon IOWA Somewhat warmer Mon day afternoon Monday night and Tuesday forenoon Moder ately strong winds in west por tion Monday afternoon MINNESOTA Warmer near Lake Superior Monday afternoon and extreme cast and extreme south portions Monday night and Tuesday forenoon cooler with scattered light showers extreme northwest Monday afternoon and north and extreme west portions Monday night and Tuesday forenoon Moderately strong winds Monday afternoo IN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Sunday 73 Minimum Sunday night 38 At 8 a m Monday 44 YEAR AGO Maximum 73 Minimum 35 The figures for Sunday Maximum Saturday 70 Minimum Saturday night 36 At B a m Sunday 38 YEAR AGO Maximum fifi Minimum 45 EDINBURGH Scotland Prime Minister Churchill pictured he United States Russia China ind Britain Monday as moving Steadily onward from strength to itrength while Hitlers prospects lave darkened to an immcasur ible degree In a belligerent and confident speech accepting the freedom he city Churchill assured Edin mrghs citizens weakness be shown to the Germans in le dispute over the chaining of var prisoners and reported 1 August and September were the least bad months since Janu iry in allied shipping losses and icw building outweighs sinkings 2 The same tiro months saw the greatest tonnage of British dropped upon Germany 3 They also marked the defin ite growth of allied air superior ity And these months too he said have covered the most numerous safe arrivals of United States troops in the British Isles Speaking in the presence oC united States Ambassador John G Winant Churchill said we have reached a stern and somber moment in the war but asserted the country is pulling together better now than ever before in its history The prime minister disclosed that he came to Edinburgh from a visit to the home fleet Speak tnc in the great Usher hall which was packed for the occasion he landedScotland as an example of national uuityv A great crowd gathered outside the hall cheered the speech Winant in a brief speech made aremark which some interpreted as advice to leave the question of a second front and other decisions to the armed forces We ask what kind road lies ahead the ambassador said We must await thc soldiers answer because our faith and our future vest with thc soldiers ot democ racy Sir Stafford Ciipps Lord Privy Seal and house of commons lender and Cnpt Randolph Churchill the prime ministers son were in the official parly Sir Harry Laudcr led the sine ing Making his speech a reply to recent utterances by German Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop Goering and Hitler the prime minister asserted There is one note which rings through all those dull low whining note of fear and a different note from that heard when Britain stood alone The most striking and curi ous part Of Hitlers speechwas his complaint that no one pays sufficient attention o his vic tories Churchill continued It strikes a chill into his mar row because in his heart lir knows that with all his tremen dous victories and vast con quests his fortunes have de clined It was apparent to me he went on that this bad man saw quite clearly the shadow of slow ly and remorselessly approaching doom Fear he added is the motive which inspires Hitlers latest out rage Churchill said that Norway Denmark Belgium and France all arc seething with the spirit of revolt and revolution and that commando raids inspire the author of so many crimes and miseries with a lively anxiety in his fear and spite Hitler turns upon prisoners of war who arc in his camps and his power Churchill asserted Just as he takes innocent hostages from his prisons in Norway Belgium Hol land and France to shoot them in the hope of breaking thc spirit their countrymen so in the flat lest breach of thc few conven tions which still hold across the lines of the World war he vents his cruel fear and anger upon prisoners of war and casts them into chains Declaring that tens of thou sands have been murdered in cold blood in Russia Poland and Jugoslavia Churchill said thc Germans had executed at least 200 in eastern and central Europe for every one in the west At that point he gave his as surance of no weakness in British reprisals for chamings by   

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