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Mason City Globe Gazette Newspaper Archive: October 8, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Mason City Globe Gazette

Location: Mason City, Iowa

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 8, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME JA OF 3 Y A K D A 4 C t V 5 M0lftj THE NEWSPAPER THAT MAKES ALL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PHESS AND UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES FIVE CENTS A COPY MASON CITY IOWA THURSDAY OCTOBER 8 1942 THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE NO 312 WONT TRY TO CAPTURE STALINGRAD Nazis Chain Prisoners British to Retaliate English Plan Reprisal Saturday Noon Unless Nazis Revoke Orders LONDON British will manacle German prisoners at noon Saturday unless the Germans re move the bonds which they placed Thursday on the hands ot British prisoners captured at Dieppe it was announced officially Thursday night The decision was announced in a war office communique which said The German government hav ing put into operation the illegal action threatened in their com muniiiue the war office an nounces that unless the German government releases prisoners captured at Dieppe from their chains an equal number of Ger man prisoners of war will be manacled and chained as from 12 noon Saturday Only a few hours had elapsed since the Berlin radio announced ha the British Canadians were manacled at noon Thursday The announce ment called it reprisal for similar treatment of captured nazis a claim which the British have vig orously denied The German action of fettering prisoners is expressly forbidden by article II of the Geneva conven tion governing humane treatment of a British govern ment statement said The statement reiterated Brit arhs goyerny ment has not permit orders for the manacling of pris oners taken in the Held The Berlin broadcast disclosing that the Germans thus had put into force a threat they made Wednesday also referred bittcrly to allied plans for the punish ment of war criminals after the war These gentlemen the an nouncer said should take heed lest one day Germany should adopt this decision for its owi purposes and apply it to Mr Roosevelt and other warmon gers Britain has denied repeatedly Ihe nazi accusations that Ger mans taken at Dieppe wer shackled and officials Wcdnesda called the nazi threat in effect an ultimatum with a 24 houi deadline practically a piece ol blackmail The war office warned Wednes day that wanton reprisals against Britons would not be overlookec and it was learned that a furthei official statement on the Germai action may be made later The German action mainly af fects Canadians of whom 2547 were missing after the Dieppe assault GERMANS TAKE Good idea Didnt Wotk r ACTION AGAINST DIEPPE VICTIMS Al Skelhnger Clear Lake was hired bv the Mason City bnck and Tile company to wreck a chimney 105 feet tall and 1 feet in diameter at plant No 6 He is shown iust alter lightingkindling soaked with kerosene which was to burn out the props which held the chimney after bricks had been removed ior one foot more than half its circum ference With the props burned out the chimney sup posedly would fall of its own wait Defies Law of Gravity Its a dud Skellinger knocked out the last of the props with a long board after most of them had burned up But the chimney still stands on less than half its base Its a fact Just look Its defying the law of gravity BANG Timberrrr 150 State Guardsmen Busy Studying Army Extension Courses DES MOINES Col John T Lonsdale chief of staff of the Iowa state guard reported Thursday that approximately 150 state guardsmen arc now crack ing Ihe books studying various regular army extension courses Fifteen courses formerly used by the Iowa National Guard were made available lo the stale guardsmen last month and more men are enrolling in the courses each day Colonel Lonsdale said Designed primarily to further the military education of com missioned officers the courses also are designed to qualify competent enlisted men who are considered competent officer candidate ma terial Reds Report Gestapo Chief in Denmark Has Gone to Berlin MOSCOW fliTass reported Thursday in a dispatch datclincd Stockholm that the German ges tapo chief for Denmark named Kanstein had come to Berlin amid rumors that he would be named reichs commissioner for Denmark and the little kingdom would be reduced to the status of Norway and Holland German occupation under BILL IS SENT TO HOUSE SEEKING Swells Countrys Arms Cost to 6 Times That Spent in World War I WASHINGTON 95tiG21 appropriation bill swelling the countrys cost of arms to more than six times the bill for World war No 1 was sent to the house floor Thursday with approximate ly 90 per cent of the new expen ditures earmarked for the navy In approving the omnibus sec ond supplementary national de fense bill the house apropria tions committee authorized 14611 new naval planes to complement an unprecedented aircraft carrier building program now under way Simultaneously the bill would furnish fresh financial reserves for the war projects of a dozen different govern ment for Ihe war machine to roll on air lanes to carry the allies message of victory homes for war work ers The set apart for the navy would raise its spending credits for the fiscal year of 193 to 330327982282 while the as a whole would in crease the total voted for defense and war since 1940 to 000000 A total of was voted to finance construction of the 14611 naval planes and to help meet the presidents pro duction goal of 60000 planes this year and 125000 in botl Ihe army and navy In discussing those goals Un der Secretary of the Navy Jamei V Forresta told the committee that the number of manhours required lo build big planes had been cut almost in hair while Commander G W Anderson of the navy bureau of aeronautic reported thai peak production probably would be reached about December of next year Yank Applies Mask of Mud A ruKKed jungle roopcr sta tioned at a U S outpost in the Panama canal area finished the job of applying a mud pack mask one of the camou flage tricks used by jungle troops lo hide themselves in the undergrowth on patrols Associated Press photo from U S army surgery said ill another section HUNT FOR ARMS IN NORWEGIANS HOMES STARTS 15 Hostages Killed by Gestapo May Extend State of Emergency LONDON German troops and gestapo agents have started a systematic search of Norwegian homes for arms as the result of big scale patriot disturbances at Oslo Trondheim and Narvik Norwegian sources reported Thursday It was indicated that the Germans might soon have to declare throughout Norway the state of emergency imposed on the Troiulhcim area where 15 more hostages had been slaugh tered by sostapi firing squads in the floodlighted courtyard of their headquarters to bring a two day toll to 25 Advices reaching London said the Germans started house to house searches hi Oslo Wednes day night and continued them Thursday Many persons were being ar rested it was said Norwegian advices reported that German soldiers and civili wounded than in former wars MKJSMS by the navy already had result ed in recovery of between three or four hundred million dollars in excessive profits Forrestal also said that we should put every possible effort we can upon aircraft carriers That involves a change of em phasis upon other materials he added because the capacities of producing machine tools gears and machinery to build carriers must be taken away from some thing else Towers reported that large air craft carriers are preferable even least two nazis and 12 or more civilians had been wounded Thirty persons were seized as hostages and many arrests were Timbcrrrr The chimney is on its way down at last But that was only after the second dynamite charge had been set off The first charge two sticks was placed at the base opposite the hole Blnm Lots of other results The chimney still stood Get some more dynamite said B E Setterberg company superintendent who had waited two hours since the fire was lighted in order to see the chimney fall Five sticks of dynamite were placed so that they tore the hole in the chimney still larger That did the trick Lock photos Kaycnay engrav ing Tony Horse Used by Tom Mix Has Brief Reprieve From Death HOLLYWOOD the horse which Tom Mix rode to fame enjoyed a brief reprieve from death Thursday I von Parker Hollywood attor ney to whom Tony was left by the late cowboy star said he probably would have the horse killed within another day or twoT He planned to have Ihc ngiiia horse now 40 years old and badly crippled Riven a mercy death by a veterinarian Wednesday He postponed the action because he could not arrange immediately for a taxidermist to mount the hide for preservation among curios collected by Mix cations the measure carried for the office of ci vilian defense 525000000 for the office of war information S50000tt000 for war housing Jo produce rubber from the guayule plant 000 for tile Avar manpower com mission 55200000 for the office of defense transportation and SS 000000 to promote friendly re lations between his country and oilier nations in the western hemisphere In granting the office of war information an even approximately S2000000 less than it had appropria tion committee declared that wars are conducted on the three mportant fronts of military oper ations economic controls and the dissemination of psychological in formation The United States with ihc other united nations must ulcc7uately pursue all three if vic tory is to he attained In modern times the com mittee quoted Elmer Davis OWJ chic T as saying everybody knows that the victories of Hit lers armies have been immensely facilitated particularly in France by the psychological preparations that softened up not only a good part of the French people but still more a good part ot the govern ment Hitler Davis cautioned is using that same weapon on us Ion He has been using it for years past and we would be fools not to use it on him and his allies as well Along with the report the com mittee made public a transcript of testimony carefully edited to eliminate military information of value to the numerous highranking government officials Included in the public portions was testimony by Rear Admiral J It Towers until recently chief of Ilic Bureau of Aeronautic that the navy now has considerably more pilots lhan required for our general needs that nonrigid air proving ex tremely valuable in combatting the submarine menace that the navy is building numbers of 12 and 20mangliders for use by the marines that the bill would pro vide funds for 72 new blimps which would give us about 120 patrol airships 12 at the ten dif ferent stations protection and they can take much more punishment and they can operate more airplanes The smaller carrier does not really pay It is not an economy GOLD MINES TO BE SHUT DOWN Would Release Men for Vital Production war production board Thursday or dered the shut down 200 to 300 the nations largest gold mines in order lo release manpower for work in copper ami other vital war metal production The taking days sold must cease out new ore within seven The order covers all mints in which gold is producer including those of Alaska and other terri tories except mines which pre viously had been accorded pref erential priority treatment by WPB because of their byproduct output of such waressential met als as copper lead and zinc Cer tain small mines were cxcepted Mines are directed to halt op erations at the earliest possible dale and at the latest to slop breaking out new ore after Oc tober 15 All operations must stop within GO days except the mini mum activity necessary to keep buildings and equipment in repair and the workings in safe condi tion hiding or transporting arms Norwegian guerrillas operat ing in the key Narvik area iust abovethe Arctic circle were reported to have rescued a group of Russian war prisoners in a daring attack on a Ger man base It was reported that large stores of arms had been seized in Oslo and that serious clashes continucc between patriots and gcstapo agents A Norwegian g o v e v n m e n spokesman expressed belief thu the Germans had organized a do liberate terror campaign in ai attempt to break Norwegian re sistance but said the plan was due to fear of an allied invasion Advices were that among thi patriots arrested wcie ma charged with transporting or hid ing weapons and organizing snipe units to aid any allied landing Further H was said the gcs tapo suspected he Korwcgiai government in exile here or fi nancing the patriot undcrgroum organization Swedish newspapers openly sided with the Norwegians and called the execution of patriots obviously acts of terrorism The Stockholm newspaper So cialDemokralen said This sort of justice has been applied to other countries Now it has been applied to a kindred nation of our own Foreign and Scandinavian ideas of inch justice must cause a wave of deepest in dignation against the and warmest sympathy with Ihc nation so sorely tried Reports had leaked out of Nor way that there had been many proallied demonstrations as the result of a daring British daylight bombing raid on Oslo Sept 2G These demonstrations had now turned into more active anti German manifestations Jap Threat to Moresby Is Removed GENERAL MacARTHURS HEADQUARTERS Australia Ufi Gen Douglas JlacArthurs first ig offensive operation in New uinea has been completed with triking success and all immediate anger to Port Moresby the allied itadel on Ihe south coast has jeen removed It was understood liursday V Australian ground forces had driven the Japanese weakened and demoralized by hunger and privation back across the Owen Stanley mountains The enemy forces had fallen nto a trap and as the result had uffcred their second major de feat in New Guinea in five weeks The first had come when the Aus ralians aided by a small force if American troops had trapped i big enemy invasion forcu at Milne bay There was doubt whether lite Tapanesc would now be able io ffer a new threat to Port Mores through New Guinea to northeastern Australia without a naval fleet in a frontal nttack At the same time it was implied hat MaeArtluir aware the dif ficulties involved would not start i drive to sweep the enemy from he invasion bases along the north Vew Guinea coast without long and thorough preparation and probably the support of a fleet of lis own V The Australians veterans of middle eastern campaigns hud advanced slowly and relentlessly from the farthest point of Hie enemy advance 32 air line miles from Port Moresby to the hump of the mountains more than 70 road miles from the allied base They marched in sheetlike rain through mud and over tortu ous treacherous trails leading up and down a long succession o razorback ridges without once contacting the main enemy forces They found only enemy supplies and equipment and bodies of the dead often victims of privation FOUR INJURED IN GAR CRASH Auto Burns Following Plunge Into Ditch Four persons were injured ant one car was completely de stroyed by fire in an autotruel collision in front of the KGLO transmitter station on Highwa No 18 west of Mason City abou 8 oclock Wednesday night Air aiicl Mrs C N Burwcll 42 ourth street northeast ami R C Rcichardt 21 Sixth street north rast and Richard Cahalan 41 ixth street southeast were tin njured persons The accident occurred as M Buy War Savings Bonds and Rear Admiral Luther Sheldon Stamps from your GlobeGazelle ITr assistant to the chief of the carrier boy navy Bureau of Medicine and lowan Stops Arguing With Wife Goes in House Kills Self SIOUX CITY Bunch 27 of this city stopped talking in Ihe midst of an argu ment with his wife entered the house and killed himself early Thursday with a single shot from a 22 caliber revolver through the center of his forehead Acting De tective Chief Maurice Farley said Mrs Bunch was taken to the po lice station in an hysterical condi tion and suffering from a broken nose and sprained ankle She was not able to answer questions of police or her family coherently Coroner J M Krigstcn gave a verdict ot suicide Buy War Savings Bonds and Stamps from jour GlobeGazette carrier boy 3unveil attempted to drive inti he T G McGce driveway acros the highway from KGLO Ucich nrdts car which WHS travclin west struck the rear of th Inick Both Ihe truck and ca andcd in the ditch on the nort side of the highway Mr Burwell was cut above th left eye nnd Mrs Burwcll wa iruiscd They were treated at th Mercy hospital and dismisses Cahalan is undergoing treat men for an injured right shoulder an culs on the left hand nnd on hi head Reichardt received cuts o liis right wrist and on his fact They are still at the Mercy hos pital Sheriff Tim Phalcn and police investigated the accident Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Cooler late Thurs day afternoon Thursday night and Friday forenoon IOWA Slightly cooler in nortli wTest and extreme north portion Thursday afternoon and re mainder of state Thursday and Friday forenoon light showers in northeast portion Thursday afternoon MINNESOTA Somewhat cooler Thursday afternoon through Friday forenoon Scattered showers northwest and extreme west portions Thursday night IN MASON CITY GlobeGn7elte weather statistics Maximum Wednesday Min Wednesday night At 8 a m Thursday YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 77 50 52 Workers Increase in Washington Despite Decentralization Plan WASHINGTON W Despite the decentralization program which moved 1200 persons from the capital to other cities the to tal of civilian government work ers in Washington increased 5 per cent over the previous month to 275362 during August the U S civil service commission re ported Thursday Reod the U S ARMYS SPECIAL MESSAGE to men of 18 and 19 on page 2 NAZIS SAY THEY WILL RUIN CITY WITH BIG GUNS Berlin Radio Indicates Change of Strategy in Siege of Metropolis By ROGER D GREENE Associated Tress War Editor The Germans implied Thurs ay that they had given up hope C capturing all of Stalingrad by orm and hinted they would use heir massed artillery to wipe ut that part of the city where Russian resistance cannot be racked After taking the heart ot Stal ngrad and penetrating to the a Berlin radio broadcast aid the remainder ot the city eed not be stormed by infantry nd sappers but can be laid in uins systematically by heavy and caviest artillery Soviet tanks were officially re lorted to have broken into the 40 mile German barrier lorthwest of Stalingrad Thursday he 45th day of bloody siege and xis sources declared the Russians vcre now beginning to stream lack across the Don river Soviet dispatches said the lunge by Russian tanks into the German left flank had forced the invaders lo divert veteran Prus sian troops the elite of Adolf Hitlers armies from other fronts in an effort lo stem the assault These dispatches said the Ger mans pouring more and more men nto the struggle had lost thou sands o troops hundreds of trucks ind armored cars and scores ot tanks without compensating gains during the last three days Hitlers high command as serted that Russian forces en circled northwest of SUUnxrM had been into and annihilated The German transocean news agency said the encirclement was executed in he suburb of Orlovka which the German command de clared several days ago had been captured in an enveloping move The size of the trapped soviet con tingent was not disclosed Also in Stalingrad the enemy nad to give up further terrain in heavy struggles a nazi com munique said Transocean said a large block ot houses in the northern part oE the city had been wrested from the defenders in a fierce fight these German claims soviet headquarters announced confidently Our froops arc holdlmr their positions More important the red armies were declared to he hacking into the German left flank above the Volga metropolis overruning nazi positions studded with halfburied tanks The northwest barrier stretch ing between the Don and Volga bas been frequently cited by the German high command as guard ing the main nazi siege armies A bulletin from red army head quarters failed to indicate the ex tent of the soviet lank tin list but reported Vorlhwcst of Stalingrad lank crews broke into enemy positions and dcslroycd tanks CUK into the erounrt eight juns and five ammunition trucks anil wiped out about 250 Ger mans A Rome radio broadcast heard in London said Russian troops surging back across the Don Volga corridor had bridged the Don with pontoon and regained footholds on the west bank If true this would indicate hat Marshal Semcon Timoshenkos relief offensive might seriously threaten the longdrawn German supply lines and possibly even jeopardize the whole nazi siege effort by an encirclement sweep Inside Stalingrad the citys re inforced defenders beat off every German attack in the last 24 hours dispatches said and tight ened their hold on recaptured streets Frontline advices to Red Star the soviet army news paper disclosed that German shocktroops recently penetrated into the northeast suburbs at tackinK al night along a difcfi leading to the Volga hut de clared that a Russian guard di vision drove Ihcra back Red Star said the northeast dis trict included the huge Stalin tank and tractor factory the Red October metal works and other war plants surrounded by work ers homes The newspaper said Russian troops stopped the Germans in the workers quarter and threw them back and the invaders failed lo make a further advance against strengthened soviet defenses V   

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