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Mason City Globe Gazette: Tuesday, October 6, 1942 - Page 1

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   Mason City Globe-Gazette (Newspaper) - October 6, 1942, Mason City, Iowa                             NORTH IOWAS DAILY PAPER EDITED FOR THE HOME of AND ASCHIVES NES IA THE NEWSPAPER THAT VOL XLVIII ASSOCIATED PRESS Amp UNITED PRESS FULL LEASED WIRES MASON CITY IOWA TUESDAY OCTOBER 6 1942 MAKES AIL NORTH IOWANS NEIGHBORS THIS PAPEK CONSISTS OK TWO SECTIONS NO 310 UNREST STIRS NORWAY NAZIS ACT Off Another Sledgehammer Assault 22 ATTACKS OF Get Awards for Service to Reds NAZIS CRUSHED AT STALINGRAD Reds Knife Deeper Into German Lines North of Metropolis By ROGER D GREENE Associated Press War Editor Russian troops were officially credited with beating off another sledgehammer assault by 45000 Germans in the 43 day old siege of Stalingrad Tuesday crushing 22 separate attacks while north of the city the red armies knifed deeper into the nazi protective barrier Soviet dispatches said the Ger mans had failed to gain on any front in the last 24 hours W W Once again as though to ob scure its lack of success in the main Stalingrad battle theater Adolf Hitlers field headquarters strejsed developments in the Caucasus where a progressive German attack was described as wresting height after height from the Russians if tn Stalingrad a nazi com munique said the German at tack in embittered fighting has made a further advance Northwest of the city a second soviet group was encircled With cold nights beginning to set up heralding the eaxly ap proach ofwinter German prison ers were quoted as saying that nazi officers and troops were be coming disturbed about the pro ofthe campaign the tRussian government nevyspaper see time passing They fear delay They are fiercely vusing forward But instead of forcing the Russians to retreat the invad ers were pictured as sacrificing appalling numbers of men and machines Headlong nazi as saults in a northwest suburb alone were declared to have cost the besiegers 2000 men killed Soviet headquarters said a single Russian unit repulsed seven consecutive1 attacks by a German infantry regiment supported by 15 tanks wrecking three tanks and wiping out about a company of nazis CHURCHILL TELLS COMMONS NOT TO PRESS MATTERS As the battle of Titans contin ued into its seventh week agita tion for a second front reached a crescendo in Moscow and evoked a new warning from Prime Minis ter Churchill not to press matters We are quite clear that no statement from his majestys government is called for at the present time further than those already given Churchill told parliament in London Churchills comment was in re ply to a question as to whether the government had any statement to make on Premier Stalins let ter to the Associated Press bureau chief in Moscow in which Stalin called upon the allies to fulfill their obligations fully and on time Churchill went on I have really nothing to certainly not on the spur of the the carefully weighed statement I have made on this subject and I would strongly ad vise the house not to press these matters at a period which is cer tainly significant The British war leader warned last week against speculation on the possible time and place of allied offensive actions CARTOON EXPRESSES VIEW IN RUSSIA In Moscow the sharpest Rus sian editorial expression lo date on the lack of a second front ap peared in a Pravda cartoon show ing a group of Colonel type generals listening dumbly to two strong officers labelled General Decisiveness and Gen eral Courage The stuffedshirt officers were taster with such names as Gen eral Cannot Risk General No Hurry and General Lets Wait Soviet newspapers gave front page prominence to Stalins letter to the Associated Press Simultaneously in far off Chungking China Wendell L Willkie expressed hope that Sta lins letter would bring Russias imperative needs forcefully to f Decorations for extraordinary services in battle against in vading nazi forces have been awarded to Vassilii Kuzyarin a soviet army fighter and his sister Alexandra a nurse Both took part in numerous Russian battles before they received their awards Nazi Chutists Try to Delay Relief Army MOSCOW soviet re lief column was reported Tuesday lo be pounding south along the Don river toward Stalingrad de spite a screen of nazi parachutist snipers dropped on the steppes to protect the German forces which are hurling 19 or 20 at tacks each day at the defenders of the Volga city from the battlefronl said the Germans were making every effort to protect the left flank of Iheir troops massed at Stalingrad for the threatening drive by Marshal Semeon Tim oshenkos relief colimn The Germans it was reported realize that the relief column must be halted in order to pre vent its junction with the soviet forces inside de velopment which would force the nazis to lift their siege of the city The nazis were said to be drop ping parachutist detachments to harass the Russian column and meanwhile intensifying their frontal assaults on the battered Russian lines inside Stalingrad The parachutist snipers it was said were attempting lo divert the Russians and force them to detach substantial forces and thus relieve the pressure on the German left flank However the nazi tactics were said to have failed and the Rus sian column was slill moving ahead the attention of the peoples of the United Nations HAMMER NEW DENTS IX GERMAN FLANK Wild street fighting continued inside Stalingrad and in the north west outskirts while above the city on a 40mile front between the Don and Volga rivers the Russians hammered new dents in the vital German left flank Two soviet bulletins told progress against the socalled German barrier guarding the main nazi siege armies At midnight red army head quarters said Russian shock troops improved their positions in that sector Then in Tuesdays noon communique the Russian com mand snid Unit N made a slight advance1 in the same region Dispatches indicated that the heaviest fighting flamed in Stal ingrads northwest suburbs where three German divisions led by 100 tanks and supported by swarms of dive bombers attempted to smash into a workers settlement Soviet dispatches declared that wave after wave of nazi attacks were hurled back and the army newspaper Red Star asserted Neither tanks aviation nor tommygunners can shake the decision of our fighters tn pro tect the Volga river stronghold and repulse the German rob bers from walls of the glorious city Elsewhere on the long battle front the situation was marked by little change with the Russians holding firmly in the key sectors of Mozdok in the Central Cauca sus below Novorossisk on the Black Sea coast and around Voro nezh on the Upper Don halfway between Moscow and Stalingrad SENATE FAVORS BIG BOOST FOR INCOME TAXES Finance Committee Amendments to Huge Bill Are Taken Up WASHINGTON sen ate Tuesday tentatively approved drastically increased individual income tax rates which would take 19 cents out of the first tax able dollar in the lowest bracket The approval Was subject to later review or possible amend ment It came during considera tion one by one of finance com mittee amendments to the new revenue bill After all the committee amendments ar0 con sidered the measure will remain open to further amendment pro posals by individual senators if In approving Individual rates previously voted by the house the senate raised the normal tax from 4 lo C per cent and in creased the first bracket sur tax rate from 6 to 13 per cent In sharp graduations the surtax rate rises lo a maximum of 82 percent compared with a top of 77 per cent under present Jaw Broadening the base to achi about 7000000 more new tax payers the senate as well as til house voted to reduce exemptions of family heads from 51500 to 81200 and for single persons from 5750 to In addition the senate voted to cut the credit for dependents from to mated 600000 more taxpayers to the rolls The house had made no change in the credit for de pendents The new schedule of exemptions means that single persons makin more than a week and mar ried persons making or more will be subject to the in come tav V W Members of the armed serv ices who are below the erade of commissioned officers how ever would receive additional more than a civilian if single and more if married The house had voted to grant the addi tional military exemptions re gardless of rank Still further demands would be made on individuals under the 3 per cent victory tav on gross incomes above a specific ex emption of S624 a year The vic tory levy however is yet to be considered in a subsequent sec tion of the bill As the reading clerk ran through committee amendments to the measure Chairman George Dt Ga of the finance commit tee agreed to put over certain controversial amendments on re quest of various senators Sen ator McNary R Ore asked for t delay in consideration of taxing of income from future issues of state and local bonds Earlier Chairman George had told the senate the American people would pay taxes totalin during the coming year under pending legislation GO ONSTRIKE AT RENAULT PLANT Men Return to Work When Told 50 of Them Will Be Executed VICHY workers at the huge Renault factory in Paris struck for three hours Friday afternoon protesting conscription of workers for Germany it was learned Tuesday The Renault strike was one of several demonstrations against the governments forcedwork policies The strike at the big Paris fac tory where German tanks are built and repaired lasted for three hours The occupation au thorities ended it by sending an ultimatum to the strikers If the strike does not end im mediately will pick 50 host ages and shoot them in the fac tory yard The workers ended the strike U S Coins in Aleutians a s Bering Sea f f k Bristol Bay DAY OF COLONY EMPIRES OVER WILLKIE STATES Declares U S Duty Is to See That Asiatic Peoples Are Free CHUNGKING Wendell L Willkte broadcasting to the Chi nese people Tuesday said it is the duly of the United Stales to see that Asiatic nations will be com pletely independent after the war The time of colonial empires is over he said It is the United States duty to see ti it that China gets planes and sup plies but it is even more the United States duty to sec to il hat Asias nations after the war will be completely independent wilh government of their own With the occupation of the Andreanof islands circled inthe Aleutiansthe UnitedStates advancedits right frank from Dutch Harbor to within about 125 miles from Japaneseheld Kiska island Meanwhile the U S offensive in the Solomon islands continued to press the Japanese Solid line roughly indicates Pacific battle line Broken line shows position of U S right flank before occupation of Anclreanof islands Top map gives detail of Aleutians U S Marines Hold Solidly on Guadalcanal in Solomons Bombers Smashing at Japs in Aleutians With Daily Attacks By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS JT Brother of Herring Is Badly Burned M1NDEN Nob E Her ring K2 Atlantic Iowa brother of Senator Clyde L Herring of Iowa was so severely burned in an automobile accident near here Tuesday that attending physicians said little hope was held Cor his recovery Sheriff Owen Daley said Her ring apparently fell asleep while On route from Kearney to Hast ings and his ear left the highway ten miles north of Miiitlen Daley said the car went into a ditch filled with dry weeds which were ignited from the exhaust and in turn caused the gasoline tank to explode Herring a cabinet maker was going to take a position on con struction of the huge navy ord nance depot at Hastings lie had ust recently completed a similar ob at the DCS Moines ordnance Jlanl A farmer discovered Herring the roadside and called the Minden hospital When Iho call came in the ambulance was bc ms used in a scrap parade re sulting in a 20minulc delay Daley said U S marines clashing frequent ly with Japanese patrols were re ported holding solidly on Guadal canal in the Solomon Island5 Tues day while on the New Guinea front Australian jungle troops nfcared the summit of the towering Owen Stanley mountains after ad vances of three to six miles Gen Douglas MacArthurs head quarters said the Australian coun ter offensive had driven past Kagi the last village below the mile high gap in the range and pressed without contacting the retreating Japanese1 At the same time Washington quarters declared that new allied successes in the battle of the Pa cific showed that Japanese fool holds in New Guinea the Sol omons and the Aleutians were becoming death traps for the enemys troops planes and ships On the three strategic fronts American and allied air forces within the last week shot down 22 Japanese planes blew up a supply ship blasted a destroyer out of commission hit two cargo ships strafed barges and inflicted havoc on enemy camps ground forces and installations A navy communique said U S dive bombers and torpedo planes attacked four Japanese destroyers as they sought to cover a small landing in Ihe Solomons and left one of the warships dead in the water In the Aleutians where Ameri can forces now have occupied the Atvlreanof islands less than 400 miles from the Japanese base at Kiska U S bombers were reported smashing daily al the enemys camps and hangars In lhc southwest Pacific U S army flyinc fortresses were said lo have flown through sav ajfe Japanese opposition Monday to attack the enemys key base at Rabaul New Britain and Japanese ships al sea The big fortress planes pounded American pilot brought in his slightly damaged fortress after a 30minute battle with six Japa nese Zeros A government spokesman said that Uillkie had brought tre mendous inspiration to the people and army of China and had strengthened already close Chi neseAmerican bonds Willkies stay will necessarily be he said and we donrt doubt that he will score successia of equal magnitude when he re turns to interpret China to Presi dent Koosevelt and the American people V Willkic honor guest al a for mal dinner again Tuesday night spent much of Tuesday inspect ing Chungkings war plants Willkie denied to reporters that he had made aslaternentregard ing the opening of front since reaching China Since leaving Russia he said Ive made no statement about s second front Chou EnLai Chinese cnmrm mst leader with whom Willkie conferred Monday will join Chinese official parly at the din ner Tuesday night ror me fiiv lime in many months Gen Yu TaWci chief of the ministry of wars arms depart ment was his conductor The thing I was most inter ested in is the skill of precision workers Willkie said He lunched with Minister oi War Ho YingChin TAKE 5 JAPS ON ALEUTIANS Landing of Prisoners at Pacific Northwest Port Is Revealed A PACIFIC NORTHWEST PORT in naval action Jin the Aleutians five Japanese were landed recently at a Pacific northwest port and whisked away under guard to a previously pre pared detention spot An official source confirmed that the prisoners were handed over lo the army by the navy after their capture in the northern war zone They were the first Japanese prisoners of war io arrive in the Pacific northwest anc were bej peoples if they lieved to be lhc first in the conhad any doubt tinenlal United States I about what to Behind their capture and arrival i CKPcct from in the United States there lies a ilhc German dramatic story of an engagement Questioned in Slaying if Girl at Theater NEW BRUNSWICK N 7 A giant Negro theater porter was lold in police custody Tuesday for questioning ij the brutal killing of Marian Oliver pretty 20 yeai old factory worker whose nude and battered body was fount Monday in back of a movie liousc where she had gone alone to see a thriller film Prosecutoi John A Lynch of Middlesex coun ly said ihe man held was Jamc Swan 2G who is six feet fou inches tall BABY JS SMOTHERED NEVADA Fourmonlh old Alyce Louise Pylc daughter of Mr and Mrs Lyle Pyle smoth ered after pulling a blanket over her head while in bed Weather Report FORECAST MASON CITY Somewhat warmer Tuesday and Tuesday night little change in temperature Wednesday forenoon IOWA Not much change in tem perature Tuesday ahc r n o o n through Wednesday forenoon except somewhat cooler in ex treme southwest Tuesday MINNESOTA Not much change in temperature Tuesday after noon through Wednesday fore noon somewhat cooler south and central Tuesday night rN MASON CITY GlobeGazette weather statistics Maximum Monday fi7 Minimum Monday night At 8 n m Tuesday if Rain 01 inch YEAR AGO Maximum Minimum 45 me sumtr me uig lonress planes pounuca at once conscious of the machine airdromes and other installations guns stationed at the four corners at New Britain and then fought of the factory jard guarding the their way home through Japanese plam Zero fighters for 50 minutes One Nazis Wont Starve but Other Things Wear Down Resistance By IOUIS F KEEMLK Of the United Press War Desk It may be a coincidence but growing unrest in comiuercd Kuropc 1 tiesduy came within 48 hours of Reichsmarshal Hermann Goenngs speech in which he assured the German people that althoiiRh the others may starve this winter the Germans will be fed nl their expense In his callovis speech Gocring cast aside the nazi cloak of pre tense about Germanys intentions toward other nations in the new order of a free Europe The subject not yet officially released said the Seattle Post Intelligencer which added hat one of the five was an officer believed at one time to have been a Seattle res dent As they left the big gray ship and stepped down the gangplank where a provost marshals detail awaited them the prisoners care fully averted their faces from a shaft of light streaming out a nearby shed the paper said They walked with bowed heads Ihe lenglh of the dock under Ihe curious scrutiny of American army and navy men most of whom were seeing thoir actual enemy for the first time Iowa Woman Falls Down Stairs Dies NEWTON John Van Dusseldorp 60 died Tuesday of a skull fracture suffered when she fell down a flight of stairs at her faim home fouth of Newton liberators can have none now The speech obviously was to bolster Gorman KEEMLE morale The fact that it needs bolstering indicates that it is weakening which it undoubtedly is in the fourth year of what the Germans were told would be a short and easy war That is not to say that German morale is breaking nor that it is likely to in the near future But disillusionment and hardship ap parently are having their effect and il is likely to be cumulative The German people will not slarvc this winter that is cer tain But there arc other Ihinss tending to wear down their re sistance The frightful casual tics beinjf suffered in Russia cannot be concealed from them V British and American mass bombings are taking a heavy toil of German cities with an inevit able loss of civilian life although that is not the object of the raids This comes to a people who had been reassured by Gocring him self that they would never be bombed as Britain was Goering had to admit that the German UifUvaffe is tied up in Russia ami could not retaliate on Britain now The best he could promise was that when Russia is defeated Britains turn will come again That would seem to be cold com fort with Russia slill very much in the war and virtually certain to be in it all winter Added to its troubles on the home front Ihe Germans are faced with increasing difficul ties amoiif the occupied anil lhc satellite countries They also have the constant fear of a second front as seems evi denced ly a reported invasion alerl along the Norwegian coasl Serious opposition has arisen m Norway and trouble apparently is brewing also in Denmark hith erto i comparatively docile if un happy country German efforts lo force slave labor out of France to add to tlio 6000000 quota of enforced labor already drawn from the subju gated peoples also is encountering difficulty News Uiat 10 high of ficials of the French labor minis try have resigned in protest and that the labor recruiting bureau at Lyons had been bombed is symptomatic It indicates that the spirit of unoccupied France has not been entirely broken REPORT CRISIS IN DENMARK AS TENSION RISES Invasion Alert Ordered Along Norwegian Coast in Emergency Measures LONDON reach ig London Tuesday said German ocupation authorities hadordered an invasion alert along the entire Norwegian coast proclaimed mar tial law and rushed reinforce ments to the Trondheim area in order lo prevent revolt Information reaching the Norwegian government here said the Germans had taken emergency measures after Ihe discovery of large scale sabotage Plans which threatened lo wreck the nazi supply system Thc Germans warned the na tive Norwegians Disobedience will he crushed with nil force a Norwegian spokesman said Mass arrcsts were said lo hove been started in an effort lo ferret out the leaders of the Norwegian saboteurs During lhc last 10 days widespread sabotage of troop and supply trains and of railway and coastal transport has been re ported The nazis were havingdiffi culties in Denmark too There the parliament met to discuss a dangerous crisis in Danish German relations and advices from neutral Stockholm said the Danes fearfully awaited Ihc developments of lhc next few days There were indications that the Germans were prepar ing to impose a harsh regime The situation appeared most serious in Norway Steelhelmeted SS troops were patrol ing hcims streets with fixed bayonets Greater Germany Scheme Reported Planned by Hitler LONDON rising tide M revolt by oncefree men of Scandinavia against nazi over lordship was reported Tuesday in news dispatches and broad casts telling of a slalc of civil emergency in ihe important Norwegian coastal district of Trondheim and of Denmarks struggle to escape lotal cngulf mcnt in the reich These reports and recent hints of peace feelers by Fin land pins German dissatisfac tion with the political course of Sweden projected a broad pic Inrc of a weakening German rii in lie north At least part of the risine on position slcmmctl apparently from a scheme under which Hitler was reported planning to proclaim a Rrcaler Ger many that would include Hol land Denmark and Norway Thc free Danish council in London declared that Denmark already had received and re jected a demand for volun tary incorporation into a bloc of model stales as a show piece for Ilillcrs new order Stockholm dispatches lo Bern said the reporl lhat Holland Denmark and Norway were to he drawn inlo a greater Ger many were distinctly in Ihe category of rumors but al tributcd to them much of the recent unrest in Norway and Denmark a Norwegian government spokes man said Heavy guards wera placed on all German transport trainings Trondheim and 10 other largo districts were under martial law bcginninc at 5 a m Tuesday The SS administration tooVc over the governmental powers of Joseph Terbovcn nazi overseer and ordered fl A curfew between 10 p in and 5 a m 2 Cessation of all traffic by 7 p m and restriction of railways to members of the German armed forces 3 Com plete closing of all theaters 4 Prohibition of all meetings and of the gathering of more thai three persons and S Uncondi tional obedience to German au thority In ordering the invasion alerl along the entire coast the Ger mans also prohibited civilians from certain coastal areas ad vices said There were In creasing indications that the Germans were fcannjf an inva sion more and more and were determined o break Norwegian resistance before the crisis arose f Terbovcn had said earlier that the sabotage had become so wide f j t   

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